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Photo: Koroda Takeru.
The original 1933 building, a mix of traditional Japanese design and 1920s western architectural style, has been sympathetically renovated by architects Jun Aoki and Tezzo Nishizawa to make it relevant to 21st-century museum-goers
Ken Done. © the artist.
Now 80, Done says you should be fearless as you age and take more risks. Here he talks about why a good work is like a long-term relationship, collaborating on art with his grandchildren – and swimming with sharks.
Hilarie Mais. Photo: Val Wens.
The artist talks about her abstract constructions, which lie partway between painting and sculpture, and how her art was shaped by life in New York in the 1970s followed by her move to Australia nearly 40 years ago.
Domestic Bliss, installation view, Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow. Photo: Ruth Clark.
This exhibition of works from Glasgow Museums’ collection explores the concept of domestic bliss, from domestic labour and feminism to intimate relationships and contested social roles.
Helen Cammock. Photo: Alun Callender.
Last year’s Turner Prize-winner talks about the inspiration behind her latest film and text installation, different understandings of idleness, the role that writing plays in her practice and how her time as a social worker feeds into her art.
Cao Fei, Blueprints, installation view, Serpentine Gallery, 2020. Photo: Gautier Deblonde.
Cao’s first large-scale UK exhibition is a fantastical exploration of utopian and dystopian worlds, a collision of the real and the virtual, and a meditation on technological progress.
Cecil Beaton at Sandwich, early 1920s. © The Cecil Beaton Studio Archive.
This thoughtfully designed exhibition tells the story of Cecil Beaton and the Bright Young Things perfectly. It is engaging, informative and fun.
Chung Sang-Hwa. Work 70-9-15, 1970. Acrylic and oil on canvas, 63.86 x 51.3 in (162.2 x 130.3 cm). © Chung Sang-Hwa. Courtesy Lévy Gorvy, New York and Gallery Hyundai, Seoul. Photo: Elisabeth Bernstein.
Chung was in the vanguard of Korean abstract painting in the 1960s and 70s and this show combines 11 of his works from that time with those of some of his contemporaries.
Rembrandt van Rijn (1606–69). Self-Portrait, 1629. Oil on oak panel, 15.5 x 12.7 cm. Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Alte
Pinakothek, Munich.
Covering the first decade of Rembrandt’s work, with more than 30 paintings and 90 drawings and prints, this unusual show traces the artist’s transformation from unaccomplished teenager to one of the world’s greatest artists.
The impact of Covid-19. Image by Martin Kennedy © Studio International.
In the second part of this five-part essay, comprising conversations with multiple artists around the globe, we look at the impact of self-isolation, either due to sickness or preventatively, and financial implications.
Lygia Clark. Modulated Surface, 1955. Industrial paint on Eucatex, 62 x 86. Collection of Ana Eliza and Paulo Setúbal. © Courtesy of The World of Lygia Clark Culture Association.
Best-known for her sculptural and interactive later works, a survey of the first decade of the Brazilian modernist’s practice reveals her as a multifaceted, quicksilver painter.
Robert Fitzmaurice and a visualisation of The Deity at Sandham Memorial Chapel. © the artist.
The artist talks about the work in his latest show, now postponed, his interests and influences – and how he is coping with lockdown.
Uffizi, Florence, website homepage, screenshot captured 15 May 2020.
As Italy tentatively enters a less restrictive phase of Europe’s longest lockdown, the leaders of three prominent art institutions consider the immediate effects and longer-term implications of a global calamity.
John Newling in his studio. Courtesy the artist.
Newling’s ecological artworks provoke questions about how we can work in harmony with nature and contribute to a sustainable future for all.
Nicolaes Maes, Girl at a Window, 1653–5. Oil on canvas, 123 × 96 cm. Loan from the Rijksmuseum. © Rijksmuseum Amsterdam.
The National Gallery charts the fascinatingly bisected oeuvre of Nicolaes Maes, whose early genre innovations were abruptly supplanted by his hugely successful career as a portraitist .
Jessica Mitchell, Untitled, 2019. Oil pastel and pencil on paper, 29.7 x 21 cm. Created as part of the ongoing Sour-Puss: The Opera collaboration with Diogo Duarte. © the artist.
This essay, comprising conversations with UK-based critics looks at the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic on their work and prospects.
The impact of Covid-19. Image by Martin Kennedy © Studio International.
In the final instalment of this five-part essay, comprising conversations with artists around the world, we look at the possible long-term effects of the Covid-19 crisis on the art world and the rise in online offerings.
The impact of Covid-19. Image by Martin Kennedy © Studio International.
In the fourth instalment of this five-part essay, comprising conversations with artists around the world, we look at the work artists have made in response to the coronavirus, and the prescient zeitgeist.
The impact of Covid-19. Image by Martin Kennedy © Studio International.
In the third part of this five-part essay, comprising conversations with artists around the globe, we look at the impact the pandemic – and imposed isolation – is having on them in terms of community and inner resilience.
The impact of Covid-19. Image by Martin Kennedy © Studio International.
This five-part essay, comprising conversations with multiple artists around the globe, looks at the far-reaching effects of the Covid-19 crisis on their livelihoods and practices, both negative, in terms of financial losses and future worries, but also lessons learned, communities built and new works inspired. Part one looks at the impact of cancelled shows and fairs.
Frederick Evans 1853-1943. Portrait of Aubrey Beardsley, 1893. Photo-etching and platinum print on paper, 11.5 x 16.5 cm. Wilson Centre for Photography.
In the largest exhibition of Beardsley’s drawings for 50 years, we see evidence of his exquisite practice and a dedication to drawing in a painfully short life and career.
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