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Sergio Camargo: Mármore
More than 30 years since Camargo’s last London exhibition, Lisson Gallery’s head of exhibitions, Emma Gifford-Mead, talks to Studio International about the importance of bringing his work to a British audience.
Herman de Vries: ‘My guru is a squirrel’
The artist, whose work spreads far beyond the confines of the Rietveld pavilion, explains why he looks to this creature for guidance in every day living, noting the importance of nature as mother, truth and teacher.
Sheikha Lateefa bint Maktoum: ‘I am a veiled woman, so it’s a natural process to have veiled women in my work’
The founder of Tashkeel, Dubai’s first public studio space for artists, talks about her hopes for the centre, being a role model for young women in Dubai, and how being a mother has changed her pace of work.
Pulitzer Arts Foundation marks its relaunch
With a new name, a doubling of gallery space, and new director Cara Starke, the revamped museum is kicking off with an exhibition of three great American artists, Alexander Calder, Fred Sandback and Richard Tuttle.
Sophia Narrett: ‘I see the sewing process as akin to drawing’
Sophia Narrett talks about the process of making her embroideries, why she uses pop culture for source material and why narrative is so important to her.
Patricia Cronin: ‘A silent protest can be quite powerful’
The artist talks about Shrine for Girls, her installation at the Venice Biennale that commemorates three girls raped in India, 276 schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram, and the women of the Magdalene laundries, and what compelled her to speak out.
Eileen Cooper: ‘Artists are real sponges. We take things and absorb them and eventually use them in our work’
The artist talks about having a retrospective at the Royal Academy at the same time as showing in its Summer Exhibition, critics’ sometimes overzealous interpretation of her works and her love of materials and process.
Geoffrey Eastop: ‘The character of the mark describes the object’
Geoffrey Eastop – his creative legacy. Studio international visited Ecchinswell in Hampshire – to view Geoffrey Eastop’s Open Studio. We had arranged to interview Eastop, but very sadly he died at the age of 93, on Christmas Day 2014, some days before we were due to meet and only three months after the death of his wife, Pat.
Conrad Shawcross: The Dappled Light of the Sun
As well as his epic, sprawling installation that greets visitors to the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, you can see miniature sculptures by Conrad Shawcross at the Victoria Miro Gallery.
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: ‘Maybe I’m not as interested in people as I thought I was’
The artist, whose latest exhibition, Verses After Dusk, is on at the Serpentine Gallery, London, talks about how she makes her paintings timeless and placeless, and her interest in the nature of painting itself and what that does to the subject of her work.
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Verses After Duskis, Serpentine Gallery, London, until 13 September 2015.
Sarah Lucas: I Scream Daddio
Sarah Lucas came to prominence in the 90s with the generation of Young British Artists, but it has taken her until now, at the age of 52, to be invited to represent Britain at the Venice Biennale. Curator Richard Riley talks to Studio International about why, with a new shift in her work, this is just the right moment.
Carol Bove/Carlo Scarpa
This exhibition brings together sculptures by US artist Carol Bove and furniture and sculptures by Venetian architect and exhibition designer Carlo Scarpa.
Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, until 12 July 2015.
Fighting History
Fighting History, an exhibition examining 250 years of history painting, has received a torrent of abuse from the British press. It has been accused of being “feeble,” “terribly presented” and “frustrating.” Surely, it can’t be that bad?
Tate Britain, London, until 13 September 2015.
Carsten Höller: Decision
In his latest major exhibition, Carsten Höller’s playful artwork turns the Hayward Gallery into a theme park, with the use of installations, kinetic sculptures, videos and light.
Hayward Gallery, London, until 6 September 2015.
Richard Tuttle: Separation
Richard Tuttle’s third solo exhibition with Modern Art shows four new bodies of work that continue his exploration of the properties of humble, everyday materials such as paper, cloth, wood and wire.
Modern Art, London, until 27 June 2015.
Julian Opie: ‘I’ve always used movement as much as colour or imagery’
The artist talks about his current exhibition at the Alan Cristea Gallery, playing with the way we interact, see and deal emotionally with the world through vision, light and the brain – and making rude drawings of his tutors as a student.
Chloe Dewe Mathews: ‘I wanted to bring the viewer in, so they become part of the congregation’
Chloe Dewe Mathews’s Tate commission, Congregation, looks at south London’s African churches, capturing the community in the physical and emotional act of worship. She talks about what motivated her to video the congregations and why the new Bosse & Baum Gallery was such a perfect venue.
Agnes Martin
This major retrospective spans Martin’s career from the early 50s to the last drawing made before her death, and confirms her as one of the foremost painters of the 20th century.
Tate Modern, London, until 11 October 2015.
Alighiero Boetti: Order and Disorder
As well as some of his best-known works of embroidery and ballpoint-pen drawings, this exhibition includes fascinating archival material, including postcards, photographs and letters that shed light on the artist’s life.
Mazzoleni, London, until 31 July 2015.
Roni Horn: Butterfly Doubt
Three recent series of works from the New York artist, using her trademark method of tessellating two pictures together, draw the viewer into a carefully choreographed network of associations.
Hauser & Wirth, London, until 25 July 2015.
Reflections on the Self: From Dürer to Struth
The artist talks about her latest exhibition, The English Garden, explains why it is a lot harder to make a small painting than a big one, why the surface of a painting is so important for her, and how she uses other artists as her source.
Maccarone, New York, until 20 June 2015.
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Anna McNay: New exhibition @StormKingArtCtr features the first major grouping of Lynda Benglis's outdoor fountains. @annamcnay met her @HepworthGallery http://www.studiointernational.com/index.php/lynda-benglis-video-interview-hepworth-wakefield

Anna McNay: Penny Slinger's works were long lost to the UK but now she is back @Riflemaker_Soho & @PhotoLondonOrg. @annamcnay spoke to her: http://www.studiointernational.com/index.php/penny-slinger-interview-being-different-is-just-who-you-are-tantra-nik-douglas

Nicola Homer: Lawrence Lek has won the Converse x Dazed Emerging Artists Award. His work is on show at the Royal Academy from 18 April until 17 May.

Nicola Homer: A major UK retrospective of Sonia Delaunay’s vibrant work is now at Tate Modern after its exhibition in Paris, reviewed here: http://www.studiointernational.com/index.php/sonia-delaunay-les-couleurs-de-l-abstraction-review

Anna McNay: Happy 70th Birthday to Anselm Kiefer! Revisit his @royalacademy show here: http://www.studiointernational.com/index.php/anselm-kiefer-retrospective-royal-academy-of-arts-london

Anna McNay: Maggi Hambling's War Requiem & Aftermath opens tomorrow @CultInstKings http://www.studiointernational.com/index.php/maggi-hambling-walls-of-water-review-interview-national-gallery-scallop

Anna McNay: Shortlist announced for @ArtCatlin Prize http://www.artcatlin.com/en/ @studiolatest will be filming the exhibition & artists in May

Anna McNay: #Ribbons is among 3 works by @ed_atkins acquired by @Stedelijk #Amsterdam. Hear more from Ed here: http://www.studiointernational.com/index.php/ed-atkins-ribbons-serpentine-sackler-london @SerpentineUK

Anna McNay: Congratulations to Alex Hartley on winning @Arts_Foundation Award 2015. @studiolatest spoke to him up high @FstoneTriennial http://www.studiointernational.com/index.php/alex-hartley-vigil-folkestone-triennial-interview

The Drawn Word: ‘Even if I write my name I am drawing’

The Drawn Word. Published by Studio International and the Studio Trust, 2014. Cover image: Will McLean. “All writing is drawing/ Method of Investigations”.

 

This publication focuses on explaining the relationship between writing and drawing; the ideas raised at the symposium are expanded and clarified, with the inclusion of artists’ and academics’ contributions from sources as diverse as Oxford professor emeritus Martin Kemp – who has written on the Leicester Codex by Leonardo da Vinci and Professor Asa Briggs (a leading British historian and a key code-breaker at Bletchley Park during the second world war) – who discusses, “Drawing as Code”.

The Drawn Word is the product of a research project funded by an Arts and Humanities Research Council networking grant that explored the relationship between writing, drawing and literacy. As such it is a collaborative publication between Studio International, the University of the Arts London (UAL) and the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University (RMIT).

Editors: Professor Stephen Farthing RA and Dr Janet McKenzie
Publisher: Studio International and the Studio Trust, New York and London, 2014.
Content: 128 pages, full colour.
Language: English.
ISBN: 9780983259954 (Softcover).
Dimensions: 280 x 115 x 11 mm (11.0 x 8.7 x 7/16 in).
Price: UK £20, US $30, A $40.


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