logo studio international
Search
 
Results
Total: 479 results found.
Will Alsop, Sharp Center. <em>Exterior</em>. …o, Canada Will Alsop Opened 25 September 2003 by RICHARD CARR The news that four British architectural practices - Will Alsop, Norman Foster, Grimshaw and Aedas - have made it to the final four teams selected to produce 'signature' designs for Toronto's £1.4 billion Spadina subway extension underlines the high regard given to British architects in Canada. As Toronto Transit Commission chairman Adam Giambrone has said, his demand for exceptional design was directly influenced by European projects in cities like London, Madrid and Stockholm: 'Choosing the best architects working today will signal not only to the world, but to the people of Toronto, that this city cares about excellent public spaces and facilities.' In Alsop's case, his selection may well have been influenced by his design (by Alsop Lyall & Stormer) of the North Greenwich station on London's new Jubilee Line, but it is hard not to believe that equally influential was Alsop's design of the Sharp Center for Design t…
The view to the hall gives some idea of Jacobsen's 3m grid as applied 
        to the landscaping of the college … playing fields. RICHARD Carr RICHARD Carr graduated from St Catz in 1959, after which he watched Jacobsen's buildings going up with great interest. …
Wang Du. Psychiatrie et Cardiologie, 2016. Installation view, EXPO Chicago, 2017. … individualistic tone: Gagosian showed Ed Ruscha, RICHARD Prince and Chris Burden. Galerie Daniel Templon showed Julian Schnabel and Gregory Crewdson, while David Zwirner dedicated half of its large booth to William Eggleston. [image6] Across the wider fair, paint was thick, strokes were bold, contrast was high, influences were urban, photography influential and the line between figuration and abstraction seemed more blurred than ever. A younger generation of new US artists could be seen dipping into the past 50 years of American art, with the humorous and slightly dark attitude of the aforementioned established contemporary artists, while adding a whole new set of contemporary influences from the internet, society and the city. [image13] [image15] A majority of US-based galleries took part in Expo Chicago and consequently ended up stealing the show. Washington DC-based gallery Connersmith presented US artist Wilmer Wilson IV’s plywood boards collaged with urban flyers and old l…
Frieze New York 2015. Photograph: Miguel Benavides. … of such as Ken Price and Sam Francis; a sweep of RICHARD Tuttle’s new work at Pace showed the old master acing new tricks; and a survey of John McCracken’s flamed resins at Zwirner lit their surroundings like new pennies. Refreshingly curbed was the still-trending spectacle-art that spreads out from the walls to literally stop you in your tracks. Exceptions were a couple of the still-ubiquitous pieced mirror-works aimed at the selfie generation; a few overly clever installations such as those by Josef Strau at Greene Naftali grouping the sort of disparate objects culled from thrift stores; and, at Galeria Jaqueline Martins, Martha Araújo’s – hopefully – satirical take (it won the $15,000/£9,700 Champagne Pommery prize for most innovative stand) on our interactive art moment, which loaned visitors a suit patched with Velcro and set them loose on an alarmingly steep Velcro-clad ramp. The actual showstoppers – two from the projects programme – were more intricate. Two im…
<p>Apathy’s a Drag table display, 2012. …patrons including Cornelia Parker, Iain Sinclair, RICHARD Wentworth and RICHARD Wilson. Later this month (27 June) Dilston Grove sees the opening of Swandown, a collaborative work by the artist and film maker Andrew Kötting19 and the writer, Psychogeographer (and sometimes Urban Shaman) Ian Sinclair20 “ Celebrat[ing] the Waterbound Pilgrimage, ... ever alert to the traces of submerged histories; songs, civil protest, and the wilderness, through both the real and the imagined.” Kötting and Sinclair pedalled a swan-shaped pedalo from the seaside in Hastings to Hackney in East London, via the inland waterways.” 21 Related events include PERAMBULATIONS AND CONFABULATIONS, the writer and Mythographer Marina Warner in conversation with Ian Sinclair. Move over Serpentine – CGP are stepping up to the line. References 1. SE15: Peckham hootspa 2. http:www.serpentinegallery.org/ 3. http:www.londontown.com/LondonInformation/Sights_and_Attractions/ Cafe_Gallery_Projects/959c/ 4. CGP …
Image courtesy of Royal Academy of Arts …tretat paintings are key works in Monet's career. RICHARD Thomson writes: The Manneporte is a truly striking composition. Its great sculptural form gives it the impact of the sublime. In the cramped confines of the cliff-rimmed bay, working in carefully timed sessions to avoid being stranded by the tide in a treacherous spot, Monet chose to bring the great portal into close focus, so that its huge arch fills the centre of the canvas, with views far out to the sea on either side…If he successfully evoked the sculptural sublime of the Manneporte, this was not to the detriment of naturalism and the actuality of looking. His sense of local colour was acute, nowhere more than in the sea's pearly green just below the horizon. He respected natural features, such as the flat strata set in the geological layering of the rock and chalk, or the streaks of deep brown soil spilling down from above. And he caught the moment, with silvery spray breaking on the rocks, paradoxically pa…
Albrecht Dürer. The Bathhouse, c1496-97. Woodcut on laid paper with an Imperial Orb watermark. Block and sheet: 39 x 28.1 cm. …ce, Untitled #206 (1989), depicting the artist as RICHARD III, would have clashed too violently with Wearing’s work and has accordingly been hung in another room. Similarly, The Space Age (1984) by Marlene Dumas (b1953), with its bruised appearance and receding pale blue nose, would have competed too vehemently with the oversized, fleshy Juncture (1994) by Jenny Saville (b1970). One entire wall is given over to polaroids by Andy Warhol (1928-87), displayed rather like photographs in a family home. In them, however, just like Sherman and Wearing, Warhol takes on different personae, portraying himself in whatever guise he feels fit. Similarly playing with this idea of what to hide and what to reveal of himself, Self-Portraits (1994) and Mirror Image (1974) by RICHARD Hamilton (1922-2011) show the artist at work, through a sheet of glass, on to which he smears his paint, partially obscuring his image. Gerhard Richter (b1932) goes one step further with his Untitled (Self-Portrait) (197…
Christopher Wool. Absent Without Leave (DAAD, 1993), 1993. 188 black-and-white photocopies, 21.6 x 27.9 cm each. © Christopher Wool. … Act (1988), which was done in collaboration with RICHARD Prince. “The show is over the audience get up to leave their seats …” begins the Untitled (1990-91), quoting a line from Greil Marcus’s Lipstick Traces. Wool asserts that his word paintings are active: they must “do what they say”.3 Imperative proclamations demanded by this sort of injunction are rare, however, and appear only in his later word paintings, such as: “If you can’t take a joke, you can get the fuck out of my house” (If You, 1992/2005). In most cases, Wool’s words do not tell their audience what to do in such a categorical manner, but rather create a vaguely defined psychological atmosphere by setting up a certain tone, which must be detectable by the speakers of the language, albeit at an unconscious level. This cultural subtext is most noticeable in his single-word paintings or in phrases coined from popular media, although it governs all his work, including his signature reproduced canvases, m…
Save Our Planet, Save Our Cities poster featuring Richard Buckminster Fuller's Dome Over Manhattan scheme of the early 1960s, 1971. Unknown designer © V&A Images … this particular kitchen was where Vice-president RICHARD Nixon and First Secretary of the USSR Nikita Krushchev met face-to-face for their notorious 'kitchen debate' in which they thrashed out the competing claims of communism and capitalism in providing the best quality of life for the greatest number of people. But it was also when, for perhaps ten years, Russia made an effort to match America in the field of domestic products and architecture during the thaw (as it was called) that followed Krushchev's denunciation of Stalin's policies in 1956. In the Victoria & Albert Museum's exhibition 'Cold War Modern: Design 1945-1970' photographs of this historic meeting, the American exhibition and images of Russian product and architectural designs that reflected attention to the needs of ordinary people during the thaw come in the third section. 'Cold War Modern' begins with 'Anxiety & Hope in the Aftermath of War' and 'The Conscription of the…
Sarah Lucas: I SCREAM DADDIO at the British Pavilion, Giardini di Castello, Venice, 2015. …represent Britain at the Venice Biennale. Curator RICHARD Riley talks to Studio International about why, with a new shift in her work, this is just the right moment This year’s British Pavilion at the Venice Biennale cannot be missed, sending its bright yellow, sunny rays beaming across the Giardini. As curator RICHARD Riley notes, you really can’t help but smile when you see it. Inside, new works by Sarah Lucas (b1962), built in response to the scale of the pavilion – some domestic, with domestic objects integrated into the sculptures; others larger than ever before – contain all the well-known Lucas tropes: phalluses, the nud, pages from tabloid newspapers, the toilet and cigarette butts – which, she explains, “are for titillation mostly. That is, gentle stimulation of a sexual kind.” [image2] Describing the pavilion as “a bit like a dessert” with the yellow like custard and the white of the plaster casts like meringue, Lucas offers up lashings of bawdiness and…
Gagosian. Jeff Koons, Baroque Egg with Bow (Turquoise/Magenta), 1994 – 2006. High-chromium stainless steel with transparent colour coating, 212.1 x 196.9 x 152.4 cm. One of four versions each uniquely coloured. … $10m. Just as startling, the celebrity architect RICHARD Meier, billed as having designed the perpetually idiosyncratic Gmurzynska booth (“They always get something wrong; the colour of the carpet, the hanging, the lighting,” was one overheard comment), was parked there by the Kabinett exhibiting a selection of collages he has made over 50 years while sitting on aeroplanes (that the theme is vaginas suggests flights of inordinate fancy). The mood was up across the board as investors descended on bankable art, in some cases aggressively. The top galleries were prepared for restocking, forking out $1,000 an hour to rent spaces across the way for works that are visited in situ then brought in to replace purchases – a Gagosian director said they bring down enough product to stock their walls three times over. Only a survey of the smaller booths told a different story, one that discloses the mood of the moment; while the top galleries were selling out at eye-popping prices, and the…
Anneè Olofsson. Still from <em>Evil Eye,</em> 2004. DVD, 10 minutes. Courtesy the artist and Mia Sundberg Galleri, Stockholm …ling animates the photographs of Sophie Calle and RICHARD Billingham, and Anneè Olofsson multimedia presentations. The subject of a recent one-person show at the Brooklyn Museum, Jesper Just spotlights manipulates sexual identity, gender roles and stereotypes.4 He subverts prevailing ideas of 'male' by inserting completely unexpected narrative twists in his stories and employs the common language of popular music to forge connections between artist, action and viewer. For example, in 'No Man Is an Island II' from 2004, a color DVCAM with sound, strangers in a traditionally male environment – a dark bar room – join to perform Roy Orbison's 'Crying'. Drowning sorrows in a bar is, of course, an acceptable form of male release; expressing and bonding in Jest's construction is far more effective. The surprise of his lighter touch initiates catharsis. Opposition is essential to Petah Coyne's works. In them, she confronts them all: male and female…
Vanessa Bell. Self–Portrait, c1915. Oil on canvas laid on panel, 63.8 x 45.9 cm. Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Fund. © The Estate of Vanessa Bell, courtesy of Henrietta Garnett. …r love. The curator of the 1999 Tate exhibition, RICHARD Shone, notes, that, later in life, Bell “tends to idealise her sitters, even sentimentalise them”,4 and it is clear that the works on display here stem from her best period. In fact, as Milroy observes: “Her period of procreativity [1908-18] is also her most intense period of creativity” – a fact that explodes the oft-upheld myth of motherhood and art being mutually exclusive. As well as introducing her to the work of the post-impressionists, Fry, with whom she had a three-year affair from 1911, had a significant personal influence on Bell’s work. He is said to have told her: “You have genius in your life as well as in your art, and both are rare things”.5 Of the effect of the 1910 exhibition, she later wrote: “It is impossible, I think, that any other single exhibition can ever have had so much effect as did that on the rising generation” and “Here was a possibl…
Jene Highstein: Space and Place, installation view, March 2018. Copyright 2018, JPNF. Photograph: Musthafa Aboobacker. …cluded Highstein, Gordon Matta-Clark, Alan Saret, RICHARD Nonas, Vito Acconci, RICHARD Serra and others, many of them in the Najar collection. As the art and artists of the 70s become of interest again, that period’s determinedly non-market-oriented philosophies might offer another, more inspiring and sustainable model for exhibitions and art world institutions, in particular in areas of the world where art has become market’s conjoined twin. Such a concept might once more be seductively radical, if also impossibly utopian. [image15]…
Claude Monet. <em>Fruit Trees,</em> c. 1865-1875. Pastel on paper, 22.5  x 29.2 cm. Private collection, courtesy of Galerie Jan Krugier, Ditesheim & Cie, Geneva …y, 1974-1992. 3. James A Ganz and RICHARD Kendall. The Unknown Monet: Pastels and Drawings. Sterling and Francine Clark Institute, Williamstown, Royal Academy, London, 2007, p169. 4. Genevieve Monnier. Pastels From the 16th to the 20th Century, Skira, Geneva, Rizzoli. New York and London: Macmillan, 1984. 5. Genevieve Monnier, Direction des Musée de France, Inventaire des Collections Publique Français: Pastels XVII eme et XVIII eme Siecles, Musée du Louvre, 1972. Pastels du XIX e Siecle, Musée du Louvre, Cabinet des Dessins Musée d’Orsay, Ministere de la Culture, Editions de la Réunion des Musée Nationaux, Paris, 1985. 6. Monnier. Pastels, p 8. 7. Ibid: p 53. 8. Michael Clarke and RICHARD Thomson. Monet: The Seine and the Sea, 1878-1883. Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland, 2003. 9. Janet McKenzie. The Testing Gro…
Glenn Ligon, Camden Arts Centre, London, 9 October 2014. Photograph: Martin Kennedy. © Studio international. …iot in 1964 – and using footage of the comedian RICHARD Pryor. A new series of enormous black-and-white silkscreen paintings are based on composer Steve Reich’s taped-speech work, using the recorded voice of Daniel Hamm, one of the Harlem Six, describing how he had to puncture one of his bruises to prove to the police he had been beaten. Layered up so as to obscure the text, creating a rhythm that recalls Reich’s musical piece, the works dominate the large gallery at the Camden Arts Centre. A new neon piece takes from the same source material and demonstrates Ligon’s technique of creating “black” neon. Finally, a seven-screen video installation uses footage from the comedian RICHARD Pryor’s 1982 standup show, Live on the Sunset Strip. Removing the sound, Ligon forces viewers to observe Pryor’s lively and exaggerated body language, exploring an alternative means of communication and self-expression. Glenn Ligon: Call and Response Camden Arts Centre, London 10 October…
Sir William Lyons, Malcolm Sayer, William M. Heynes. E-Type Roadster, 1961. Jaguar Ltd, Coventry, England. Steel body, 48 x 66 x 176 in (121.9 x 167.6 x 447 cm). Gift of Jaguar Cars. Photograph: Jill Spalding. …er of the era’s idols, all notably American – RICHARD Serra, Eva Hesse, Andy Warhol, Cy Twombly, Jasper Johns and Ed Ruscha – and all of whom straddled the decade) with Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg and Johns crowned to bookend the show. Given that little besides the dateline connects Louis Kahn’s unrealised cardboard study for an assembly building in Bangladesh with Claes Oldenburg’s soft sculptured ice-cream cone and Niki de Saint Phalle’s mixed media on wood,  grouping by year seems to function primarily as an organising mechanism, marking curatorial choice as more precisely the point. The fact that curators were recruited from all six departments (many quite young, with fresh energy and ideas) negates the horse-into-camel disdain for decision by committee, and makes a strong case going forward for the merits of interdisciplinary show-making. As with the ticket pulled from a hat, the artworks making the cut determined the winners, or in this case the dialogue. Given…
‘Death valley’ from ‘Destricted’. Director: Sam Taylor-Wood …arney, Marco Brambilla, Larry Clark, Gaspar Noé, RICHARD Prince and Sam Taylor-Wood The creators of 'Destricted' describe the production as a set of 'explicit films'. The seven short films that make up 'Destricted' are, in fact, about sex, but the term 'explicit' should be understood in a specific sense: each short was conceived and directed by a controversial name in the contemporary visual arts scene and is an artistic interpretation of pornography, not merely showing sexual acts but showing sex in a particular way and presenting sexual relations as performances. Of the seven 'directors', whose previous works bear some relation to the filmed branch of the visual arts, only two of them can be called 'filmmakers' in the traditional sense of the word: the American Larry Clark (b. 1943), who is best known for 'Kids' and 'Ken Park', and the French-Argentine Gaspar Noé (b. 1963), who created the polemic French film 'Irreversible'. Throughout their careers, both artists have dealt with …
Sidney Nolan. <em>Temptation of St Anthony,</em> 1952. Oil and enamel on hardboard, 121.8 x 91.3 cm. Collection National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. © The Trustees of the Sidney Nolan Trust …s there, returning to Melbourne in February 1944. RICHARD Haese concurs with McCaughey on the importance of the Wimmera experience on Nolan's art and on Australian art. Nolan had been committed to art for four years, an art that was more diverse, puzzling and capricious - and sophisticated in its intellectual concerns - than any of his contemporaries. The two years of the Wimmera period were to prove crucial to Nolan and his art. In these years we see for the first time Nolan reaching his full powers as an artist and confronting the full challenge of the realities of landscape and the innovations of modernism. The result was a period of development more dense and concentrated than at any other time in his career; the consequences were far reaching for Nolan and for the history of Australian painting.6 Nolan brought to his experience of the Wimmera landscape the lessons of late nineteenth-century European art and early twentieth-century art. His own interpret…
… in 1953. However, as Dyson made clear in the RICHARD Dimbleby lecture he gave on BBC1 in December 2004, he resigned not because of the Spry exhibition, but because he believed that the Design Museum was failing in its remit (established when it was founded by Sir Terence Conran in 1989) to focus primarily on the manufactured object. He described an interview - conducted with English florists on the BBC's radio programme, Today - about his resignation. After the florists had made proclamations about the life-enhancing properties of lilacs, the interviewer asked them whether or not they thought that flower design is as important - or even the same - as designing an aeroplane. They replied in the affirmative and Dyson states that this convinced him that his decision to resign had been correct. …
Installation view, Wohl Central Hall, Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 2019. Photo: © David Parry/ Royal Academy of Arts. …and a group of largely abstract works selected by RICHARD Wilson. This much smaller space allows for moments of reflection on sculptural and two-dimensional works made by sculptors, including RICHARD Long’s diptych painted with mud from the River Avon. It is a helpful interlude for the visitor, particularly because works in the adjoining galleries have a great deal to say. [image18] In Gallery I, Jane and Louise Wilson have assembled some of the most overtly political work of the exhibition. It is not easy viewing, nor should it be, with themes such as identity, migration, protest and ecological threat dealt with directly and unapologetically. Michael Dean’s floor sculpture does not pull any punches and the Wilsons suggest it sums up the feelings of a generation. Spencer de Grey’s hang in the Large Weston Room is one of the most heartening and innovative displays of architectural drawings and models at the Summer Exhibition for some years. It has been a perpetual problem for t…
David Hockney. The Room Tarzana, 1967. Acrylic on canvas, 243.8 x 243.8 cm. © David Hockney. …tream, David Hockney, Lucian Freud, Leon Kossoff, RICHARD Hamilton and Euan Uglow – in such loose-fitting terms does little justice to the subtler, more intricate dialogues operating among these artists and their work since the 1940s. In this exhibition Haunch of Venison attempts to excavate these specific connections, whether historical, aesthetic or technical, using the conceptual apparatus provided by one of the artists themselves: Francis Bacon’s description of painting as a means of capturing form and sensation as it emerges and disappears. For Bacon, and for the show’s curator Catherine Lampert, each of these ten artists uses paint to address the essential question: “How can this thing be made so that you catch the mystery of appearance within the mystery of the making?’ The question of how painting, and representation in general, can make objects, ideas or impressions come into being can hardly be considered specific to these artists’ time. Yet by the 1…
Jacob van Ruisdael. <em>View of Egmond aan Zee with a Blasted Elm</em>, 1648. Oil on panel, 65.09 x 49.85 cm. Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, NH Museum Purchase Currier Funds. 1950. Photo Jeff Nintzel. …creasingly, and especially since the land artists RICHARD Serra and the late Robert Smithson, as well as the English land artist RICHARD Long, we have come to view 'landskip' in a wholly different way. The Picturesque, indeed, was, itself, something to be abhorred by these artists, and they took evasive action against ever being so represented. Now, the aesthetic of the Sublime has exhibited a renewed currency, more readily transferable into land art and installation art. We could say that it all began with the 'landskips' of Jacob van Ruisdael. Michael Spens …
Frida Escobedo’s Serpentine Pavilion 2018. Photograph: Iwan Baan. …n Nouvel abutted by skyscrapers from Renzo Piano, RICHARD Rogers, Norman Foster and Rafael Viñoly. [image5] But as resistance to the tenets and aesthetics of modernism recede, there are other, subtler qualities of contemporary architectural practice that still have need of a platform. In fact, the more crammed with status skyscrapers London gets, the more we need pavilions in the vein of last year’s simple, light-touch, tree-like structure by the Burkina Faso and Berlin-based architect Francis Kéré and this year’s gentle sequence of perforated screens by Mexican born and based architect Frida Escobedo (b1979). [image9] Escobedo has gone for the cheapest of materials – concrete roof tiles, easily sourced and replicated. British made, these pleasingly rough-edged, dark grey, crenellated forms are stacked on thin steel bars, creating something very like the traditional like the traditional, lattice-like, patterned blocks you find everywhere in Mexico called Celosías. [image…
Georg Baselitz. Mann am Baum abwärts (Man on a Tree Downwards), 1968/69. Charcoal on paper. Presented to the British Museum by Count Christian Duerckheim. Reproduced by permission of the artist. © Georg Baselitz. …wings that wouldn’t look out of place alongside RICHARD Hamilton. Palermo, whose pseudonym comes from an American boxing manager and gangster, was close friends with Polke and Richter when they were studying in Düsseldorf. His work, the most abstract of them all, and more aligned with developments in the USA, comprises simple screen prints of basic shapes and forms, stretched canvases and painted wood. Sadly, Palermo died young, from a heroin overdose, at the age of 33. Finally, the Richter section of the exhibition contains a great many sketches in pencil, ballpoint pen and felt tip, alongside his first ever watercolours, made in a hotel room in Davos, Switzerland, on 2 January 1978. Some are studies for full works, others exercises in abstract mark-making, and some are just notes and ideas. A sheet from Atlas (1962-89) comprises 25 colour photographs and, to accompany this, there are enchanting displays of magazine cuttings depicting clouds, lakes and mountains – as inspiring …


studio international logo
Copyright © 1893–2019 Studio International Foundation.

The title Studio International is the property of the
Studio International Foundation and, together with
the content, are bound by copyright. All rights reserved.
studio international cover 1894
Home About Studio
Archive Yearbooks
Interviews Contributors
Video Cybernetic Serendipity
CyberArt Contact us
twitter facebook RSS feed instagram

Studio International is published by:
the Studio International Foundation, PO Box 1545,
New York, NY 10021-0043, USA