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Vincent van Gogh, Path in the Garden of the Asylum, 1889. Oil paint on canvas, 61.4 x 50.4 cm. Collection Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo. …: George Henry Boughton, John Everett Millais and RICHARD Parkes Bonington. When he became a lay preacher, after being an art dealer and a teacher, he based his first sermon on Boughton’s God Speed! Pilgrims Setting Out for Canterbury (1874). Van Gogh admired the bleakly beautiful landscape Chill October by Millais in his letters. He owned the lithograph A Road by Jules Laurens, after Bonington’s A Distant View of St-Omer (c1824), and kept the print until the end of his life. In a letter to his brother Theo, he said A Road reminded him of a landscape in George Eliot’s Adam Bede, which he read in 1875. With a horizon dotted with people and a great expanse of sky, A Distant View of St-Omer appears next to his Bleachery at Scheveningen (1882). A wall text reads: “Van Gogh was moved by the suggestion of a human story in Bonington’s road through a landscape.” In the insightful catalogue, the lead curator, Carol Jacobi, writes: “Most importantly, British culture informed Van G…
Michael Wang, The Drowned World, 2018. Environmental installation. Photograph: Wolfgang Träger. Courtesy of Manifesta 12, Palermo. …Palazzo Ajutamicristo, Dutch information designer RICHARD Vijgen’s Connected by Air (2018) tracks all the “flows” travelling over Palermo’s sky, including winds, satellites and wireless signals; the result provides an eye-opening window into an omnipresent but largely invisible domain. [image2] Cuban artist Tania Bruguera’s mixed media work Article 11 (2018) gathers videos, news reports, texts and satirical sketches pertaining to the protest movement around a US military global communications system housed in the Sicilian town of Niscemi, which locals claim damages human health and the surrounding ecology. As with Vijgen, Bruguera homes in on the transmission of information, in this case with the way stories can be downplayed or suppressed by the will of the press. Though her documentation, as well as a wall mural, Bruguera grants a warm, sensitive embodiment to the campaigners – something that the US film-maker Laura Poitras’s videos on the same subject elsewhere in th…
Mark Wallinger talking to Studio International at the Jerwood Gallery in Hastings, 2018. Photograph: Tom Hastings. … his composition on to Wayne to choreograph from. RICHARD Serra’s Verblist (1967-68) and Muybridge’s grid were the two starting points. It interested me that Mark could choose specific action verbs, and then Wayne could work from there. At the same time as Undance, I was working on a show at the Kunstnernes Hus in Oslo in 2010. I had a UN sign pasted outside the building. It kind of struck me that, when you see a UN sign somewhere in the world … TH: … that it’s also a prefix. MW: Exactly, and it is very much about our efforts to undo something that has been done. So, that came into it as well. TH: Undance featured moving images of dancers projected on to the Muybridge grid. How did this work? MW: In a sense, there were two sets of choreography. There was the choreography of the different movements that we filmed, which were then back-projected, and then Wayne and I developed a response to these moving images. To begin with there was a simple repetition in real space of w…
Walker Evans. <i>Subway Portraits</i>, 1938-1941. Gelatin silver print, 12.4 x 18 cm (4 7/8 x 7 1/16 in). National Gallery of Art, Washington, John Wilmerding Fund. …Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, trans. RICHARD Howard (London: Vintage, 1993), pp. 20, 87. 7. Sontag, p. 55.…
Richard Dupont. Untitled (5), 2008. Pigmented cast-polyurethane resin. Courtesy of Cheryl Gold. Photograph: Richard Dupont. …ake the head-to-toe mutant likeness of the artist RICHARD Dupont. Rendered in resin with data scanned from his body and modelled through a digital program, it calls into question the very idea of self-portrait. Bearing no relationship to Rembrandt’s searing investigations into inner life, or to Van Gogh’s piercing gaze on to incipient madness, this smooth autobiomorph is self-image as product. Far from a brush laid on canvas or a hand-held chisel meeting marble, the fabrication processes producing these designated artworks involve digital milling, rapid prototyping, audience participation and rebooting. Even a “selfie” has more soul. Although you could argue that a Ghiberti or a Bernini set their hands only to figures already carved out by assistants, those entrusted with such work were artists in their own right, many accruing their own fame. These are early days, of course, as artists are still pushing the boundaries and learning to control a technology that can take off on …
Richard Brautigan. Poem: All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace, 1960s. Photograph: Veronica Simpson. …ative of this uneasy alliance than beatnik writer RICHARD Brautigan’s 1960s poem All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace. When Brautigan first handed out free copies of his poem on the streets of San Francisco, in 1967, the social, psychological and economic impact of technology on human life was envisaged as something very different from the multiplicity of invisible tentacles via which technology facilitates / invades our lives today. Back then, popular culture saw machines as, at best, robots taking on the tasks that we find boring or tiresome; or, at worst, megalomaniac monsters reducing us to a state of subservience. Appropriately enough, Brautigan’s poem kicks off proceedings, printed in vintage typewriter font and collaged together with Brautigan’s rudimentary drawings of animals and a newspaper clipping of a Manhattan highway choked with cars. It seems only right to reproduce this oddball genius’s poem in full. All Watched Over by Machines of Lovi…
Man Ray. <em>Cadeau,</em> 1921. Iron and nails. Tate. Presented by the Tate Collectors Forum 2002 © Man Ray Trust/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2008 … is interesting to trace: it is a replica made by RICHARD Hamilton for the last Duchamp retrospective at the Tate in 1966, with the lower glass panel broken and remade in 1985. The original was made between 1915-23, and incorporated imagery from older works and studies including Chocolate Grinder, No. 1 (1913) and Draft Pistons (1914). The gradual removal of the artist's hand from the work and an interest in the potential of glass as a material and medium mark other works in this room, including Man Ray's cliché verre pieces, made by scratching through an inkpainted plate laid over photosensitive paper to produce a lightbased etching. Another arresting work by Man Ray is the photograph Elevage de Poussière (Dust Breeding) (1920), which transformed the asyet unfinished lower half of Duchamp's Large Glass into a strange dustballed landscape, highlighting the American's mastery of photography as more than a method of recording his own and his friends' painting…
Stephan Bogner, Philipp Schmitt and Jonas Voigt. Raising Robotic Natives, 2016 © Jonas Voigt. …nch: displaying the Architecture of Radio app, by RICHARD Vijgen (2015), it reveals a 360-degree visualisation of the dense system of data cables, radio signals, cell towers and satellites that are present in the building. Klein says: “This is what we want people to realise: you are already in a robotic system at all times of the day.” While expertly conjuring past, present and possible future technological realities, the exhibition doesn’t address – though it is explored in two of the documentaries, a couple of exhibits, and in the excellent and comprehensive catalogue – the most worrying question of all: who is controlling all the data that is already being transmitted and harvested by the machinery we use and inhabit? And to what end? Klein summarises: “Behind the code there is the human. And behind the human is a corporation. Technology is always a mirror of society and always reflecting the ideology behind the technology.” • Hello, Robot will be at the MAK (the A…
Top left: Jeffrey Deitch – recreation of Florine Stettheimer Collapsed Time Salon show. Top right: Sadaharu Horio's Art Vending Machine. Bottom: Cerith Wyn Evans. ... later on they are in a garden..., 2007. Photographs. Jill Spalding. …s Fergus McCaffrey (contrasting Marcia Hafif with RICHARD Nonas) and Josh Lilley (showing Tom Anholt with Kathleen Ryan) paired the sexes without referencing gender. At Los Angeles’s Kayne Griffin Corcoran, two transcendent light pieces by James Turrell backed on to gorgeous minimalist works by the all-but-forgotten 60’s LA artist Mary Corse that reflected their powdered metals like stardust. Also riding the vigorous Los Angeles art moment were Mernet Larsen’s diminutive, but boldly architectural, watercolors (Various Small Fires), Nevine Mahmoud’s hand-carved erotic forms (M+B), Alexandra Noel’s disarmingly intimate painted panels (Bodega), Rosson Crow’s cactus paintings (Honor Fraser) and Andrea Bowers’ Badass Girls at kaufmann repetto. I noted a strong representation of works made solely of fabric, newly taken up by artists both for its adaptability and its pertinence. Whether layered (Abdoulaye Konaté’s dyed-cotton dream strips), stitched (Kiki Smith’s tapestry)…
Édouard Vuillard in his studio at 56 Rue des Batignolles, Paris, c1898. Private collection. … after Les Nabis disbanded. An essay by Professor RICHARD Brettell (University of Texas, Dallas) connects memory and symbolism in Vuillard’s paintings and Proust’s novels, demonstrating how, taken together, artist and author represented the soon-to-disappear cultured class in fin de siècle Paris in its most private moments.3 The not-to-be-missed Acoustiguide audio tour for the show includes comments from Marc Salz, son of Vuillard’s American dealer; Mrs. Claude (née Bloch) Dalsace, who Vuillard painted with her family; and Mrs. Martine Martin, daughter of Simone Kapferer (née Aron) of the Rothschild banking family. The influence of Vuillard’s Jewish patrons figures prominently in this show. They welcomed the painter, raised in a working-class Catholic family, into their fold. More importantly, they commissioned paintings, murals, and lithographs from him; paved the way for solo exhibitions; introduced him to other collectors; became his main subjects; and formed deep and l…
Robert Devereux at the opening of When the Heavens Meet the Earth at the Heong Gallery, Downing College, Cambridge, 24 February 2017. Photograph: Martin Kennedy. …aire, formerly a partner in the Virgin empire and RICHARD Branson’s brother-in-law, sold off two-thirds of his collection of postwar British art and used the £4 million proceeds to set up a charity supporting artists in Africa. The African Arts Trust, as it was named, supports grassroots organisations, which, in turn, support African artists with basic needs such as studios and residencies. The exhibition specifically seeks to include some lesser-known artists, but there are some established names as well, including El Anatsui, 2013 Turner Prize nominee Lynette Yiadom-Boakye and Ibrahim Mahama, who showed in Venice in 2015 and currently has an exhibition at White Cube Bermondsey, London. Another well-known name is the South African photographer Zanele Muholi, whose work with the LGBTQ community places her at continual risk in a censorious and critical society. Ranging across photography, painting, sculpture and film, the exhibition evidences the wealth of artistic creativ…
Andy Warhol. Vote McGovern, 1972. Colour screenprint. © 2016 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and DACS, London. …mous screenprint Vote McGovern (1972), which sees RICHARD Nixon dressed in pink, glowering up with demonic yellow eyes. Although this campaign poster didn’t succeed in preventing Nixon’s re-election, Warhol believed that the administration punished him [Warhol] for the insult by continuously scrutinising his tax records. Humour creeps in with the Guerrilla Girls, who astutely highlight the inequalities of the art world, inequalities we are still living with today. The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist (1988), a drily sarcastic lithographic list, includes, “Working without the pressure of success” and “Not having to undergo the embarrassment of being called a genius”. May Stevens pulls no punches either. Her screenprint Big Daddy With Hats (1971) presents us with a naked middle-aged man, a figure based on a photograph of her father, doughy, absurd, smug and patriotic. A bulldog sporting the stars and stripes sits on his lap, with its tongue lolling.…
Roy Lichtenstein  (1923-1997). <em>Femme au Chapeau</em>, 1962. Oil and Magna on canvas 68 x 56 in. (172.7 x 142.2 cm). Collection of Martin Z. Margulies. © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein …d with all the hoopla surrounding Picasso’s RICHARD J. Daley Center Monument in Chicago with a small soft cloth reconstruction of Picasso’s gigantic steel sculpture. Juxtaposing the 1960 "Painted Bronze" of two Ballantine Ale cans by Jasper Johns with Picasso’s odd painted sculpture "Absinthe Glass" (1914) does have its wry aesthetic point; but of all the artists in the show, Johns most disappoints. His addled, cliché-riddled autumnal "Seasons" (1985-1986) and other late paintings with their sometimes merely fleeting references to Picasso lack the brilliant, vibrant audacity of his now-classic studies of the residue of consumerism—his numbers, flags, maps, and targets. Just as the old Saturday Evening Post warned, "Pop art/ Op art/Soon will/Stop art," Picasso and America Art implies that Picasso’s influence, as well as twentieth-century American painting, died with Warhol and his fellow ironists. (Picasso’s death in 1973 provides a convenien…
Graceland, Memphis<br>
      …as, price $24.95 ISBN 0-7006-0948-2. RICHARD Carr …
Versace Spring/Summer 1994. Ballgown. Pale gray silk and metal georget. …sace had begun work with the fashion photographer RICHARD Avedon. This was the beginning of a long line of fashion campaigns by Mr Avedon. 1982 was a major year for Gianni Versace that began with the launch of his innovative 'Oroton' in his collection at the Paris Opera. This metal mesh that Versace invented contradicted all of the usual properties of metal. It could be used to make delicate, shimmering evening dresses for women. It was also possible to colour and pattern the revolutionary material, as Versace often did. It could be used alone, or mixed with a variation of fabrics and patterns. Unlikely combinations included Oroton with lace, chiffon, animal skin and lace. The designer used Oroton to make slinky, figure-hugging garments that would usually require the finest silks and most delicate chiffon. Although his revolutionary fashion design was at first criticised by the Parisian Haute Couture scene, fashion's fickle nature was soon shown when Versace's fame and recognition esc…
Ince 
      and Mayhew Cabinet and stand, c.1775. Satinwood with marquetry in engraved, 
      stained and shaded woods, the drawer fronts crossbanded with tulipwood and 
      ebony mouldings 103 x 51 x 213 cm © 2003 Collection Lord Lloyd-Webber<br>
      <br>
      …n Treuherz and Stephen Wildman and RICHARD Dorment introduce the artists and the themes raised by the exhibition, and work of this period. The collection is testament to Lloyd Webber's passion for art of the 19th century (incidentally, a passion he shares with another brilliant man of the theatre - fellow collector, Barry Humphries). This exhibition is another success for the Royal Academy. References 1. Timothy Hilton, The Pre-Raphaelites, Praeger Publishers, New York, 1974, p.32. 2. Ibid, pp. 33-34. 3. Ibid, p. 52. …
William Blake. Satan Before the Throne of God, from Illustrations of the Book of Job, 1825 (published 1826). Engraving on India paper chine collé on wove paper. Jansma Collection, Grand Rapids Art Museum, 2014.1c. …f Job, acquired this year, the director of MOBiA, RICHARD P Townsend, said: “We are pleased to partner with the Grand Rapids Art Museum to share the collection, which underscores how biblical narratives have influenced artists over time, and is a perfect vehicle for showcasing the history of a creative technique, telling the story of the development of western printmaking from the Renaissance to the 20th century.” The story behind the Jansma family’s passion for biblically inspired art is as moving as the prints they have acquired. When Sidney Jansma Jr accepted a challenge to contribute to GRAM, he was merely taking another leap of faith in a life ruled by risk. A native of Grand Rapids and owner of Wolverine Gas and Oil Corporation, Jansma is a committed member of the Christian Reformed Church. Whether drilling for oil or funding a variety of Christian initiatives, he is known for acting from the heart and on gut instinct. The first in his immediate family to achieve a c…
Portrait, VS Gaitonde. Photograph: Shalini Saran. …by citing a specialist in South Asian art, critic RICHARD Bartholomew, who maintained that traditional Indian miniatures were not purely figurative, but were composed of literary and abstract elements.4 Gaitonde then might have been alluding to our necessity to “see” something in the picture, even when there is nothing objective or graphic there because, intuitively, we attempt to make sense out of unfamiliar patterns trying to connect them with what we already know. Gaitonde was influenced by abstraction as a theory and as practice; he was familiar with Kandinsky’s treatise, Über das Geistige in der Kunst, and followed Zen Buddhism in his religious practice. From Kandinsky, the painter learned to think about art in synaesthetic terms, as a form of expression that could be brought close to music by turning away from the objective world. From Zen Buddhism, Gaitonde obtained a meditative disposition, which allowed him to consider painting as a way of induction to silence of sorts…
Elaine Cameron-Weir. Found that the effect of manures, drugs, and poisons could be determined within minutes, providing plant control with a new precision. He repeated his tests on metals, administering poisons to tin, zinc, platinum, and obtained
astonishing response which, when plotted on a graph, appeared precisely like those of poisoned, 2015. Brass, alabaster.
Stone dimensions 31.8 x 31.8 x 27.9 cm, overall height 231.1 cm, others variable. © the artist; Courtesy Lisson Gallery, London. …enry Longly, Beatriz Olabarrieta, Ben Schumacher, RICHARD Sides, Cally Spooner, Alice Theobald and the art collective Am Nuden Da. The curators present new material from each artist in a fresh and engaging show. Noorali and Talbot say: “Each of these artists demonstrates one, or at times all, of the three key themes within the show – collaboration, the use of language as artist material, and an inquiry into the nature of creative labour.” The use of language as artist material is framed by a selection of works that take a linguistic turn. For the Danish-born artist and writer Thomsen, who now lives and works in London, the written language is a springboard for the series of paintings, The boys the girls and the political. “Thomsen describes in text a lived event as a stream-of-consciousness performative act, the written material generated becomes documentation of an experience much like a photograph,” say the curators. The act of writing is transformed into seven pieces, mod…
45. Alan Robb
Alan Robb. Brazil, The Taste of Blood, 2005-8. Oil on linen, 168 x 182 cm. …rospective exhibitions that were important to me: RICHARD Hamilton, Edwardo Palozzi, Edward Burra at the Tate, Lucian Freud and Michael Sandle at the Hayward. It was David Hockney’s show at the Whitechapel that caused me to trade painting in oils for acrylic. The colours were so fresh, the images so clear and surfaces so free of handling. Peter Blake and Jan Haworth accompanied a student bus trip to Bristol to see Peter’s first major solo exhibition at the Arnolfini. I was at the private view of Pop Art Redefined, curated and published by John Russell and Susie Gablic at the Hayward, which pointed up the differences between London and New York pop and explored the wider context. It was in this show that I first saw the work of Oyvind Fahlstrom, which opened another door. JMcK: What influenced the bronze sculpture, Corrie (1998)? AR: Its original purpose was as a model as reference for paintings. (I had used geographical block diagrams as a fresh approach to landscape painting.)…
Maria Sibylla Merian, drawing of a Surinam caiman fighting a South 
              American false coral snake. Surinam or Amsterdam, about AD 1699-1705. 
              30.6 x 45.4 cm © British Museum<br>
              <br>
            …ding is appropriately described by RICHARD Westmacott (who executed the sculptured figures, 1851) entitled The Progress of Civilisation. Sir Henry Ellis, Principal Librarian of the British Museum (1827-1856) later expanded the artist's words: …Man is represented as emerging from a nude savage state, through the influence of religion. He is next personified as a hunter and tiller of the earth…Patriarchal simplicity then becomes invaded and the worship of the true God defiled…Paganism prevails and becomes diffused by means of the Arts.8 What seems critical about this exhibition is the manner and method by which it brings the Enlightenment into focus as a generic force and influence which has itself conditioned the subsequent development …
Anselm Kiefer. Nothung, 1973 (detail). Photograph: © Studio International. …articular, whose epic Parzival was popularised by RICHARD Wagner (1813-83), who loosely based his opera Parsifal on it, is referenced readily with images of snow and ice stained red with blood and the use of the name Herzeleide, or “heart’s sorrow”, who was Parzival’s mother. The snowscapes also refer to the blanket of snow – or collective lack of conscience and silence – which Kiefer believes to have fallen over postwar Germany. And the use of traditional German epics – as well as of art itself – is a brave act of reclamation of things that the Nazis had taken for themselves and sullied. In the heart of the galleries, Kiefer has built a site-specific installation, Ages of the World (Die Erdzeitalter), which he worked on here at the Royal Academy. Kiefer studied law because he wanted to understand the rules underpinning why we are who we are. This question runs through much of his work and, as well as being deconstructed pictorially with his thick strokes and ruined b…
Jimmy Liao. Kiss & Goodbye, 2015 (exterior view). Mixed media. … Different from land art such as that produced by RICHARD Long, the works in Echigo-Tsumari are more like artists’ attempts to unearth the history of the region and the memory of the locals. Many artists have taken on the theme of local culture, interpreting it in their own way. Beside Doichi local train station, on the Iiyama line, is Kiss & Goodbye (2015), a train compartment-like installation that visitors can enter, by Taiwanese picture-book illustrator Jimmy Liao. Initially, Liao wrote and illustrated a picture book that told the tale of a boy who lost his parents in the devastating earthquake that hit northern Japan in 2011 and travels to live with his grandfather in Echigo-Tsumari. With this installation, Liao has brought his colourful tale to life. Entering the compartment, which is made to look like a train in a tunnel, visitors come across “the boy” kneeling on the front seats of the train, watching the scenery from the window, as he travels to his grandfather’s.…
…e commentator claims, the world of RICHARD Kelly's film 'Donnie Darko'?) are moving effects of a war drift – profoundly distressing. …
Larry Bell. 6 x 6 An Improvisation, 1989-2014. Clear glass, gray glass, and glass coated with Inconel (Nickel/chrome alloy). Forty panels, each: 72 x 72 x 1/2 in (182.9 x 182.9 x 1.3 cm). …et him! He came to my studio with Bill Copley and RICHARD Hamilton. AG: Not a bad crowd … LB:  Yeah, I didn’t know who it was at first. I was 22 years old or so when they came by. I suffer from something called hereditary nerve degeneration and was told that I was born with a 40% loss across the spectrum in both ears. But my hearing loss was not diagnosed until I was 46, so I couldn’t really hear too well. When I was introduced to Duchamp I couldn’t quite make out who he was at first. But when I eventually realised, I was catatonic. He was a really nice guy. When I did my first show, he invited me to his house for tea. There were beautiful Giorgio de Chirico paintings on the wall. It was amazing to be surround by his cronies. AG: What did you talk about? LB: I asked him if he was still working and he said: “Yes, I’m preparing a show right now of earlier work.” I then asked when he had done them? To which he replied: “Oh, when I was six or seven …” • Larr…


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