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Manuel Neri. <em>La Palestra no. 3</em>, plaster with dry pigment, steel armature, polystyrene and burlap, 30 x 51 x 17.5 in. …s of California's Bay Area, including David Park, RICHARD Diebenkorn, Elmer Bischoff, Joan Brown and Nathan Oliveira. Neri's signature material is plaster, which he loves. 'La Palestra No. 3' is an example of Neri's plaster sculpture with dry pigment, steel armature, polystyrene and burlap. As he has said, 'It's cheap. You can do anything with it. You can keep adding to the figure. If you don't like what you have, you can start over. And I love that dead white'. Despite this, he has always made extensive use of colour. Included in the exhibition was a group of drawings from the 1950s that depicted standing female figures, seen singly or in pairs. A group of drawings from the same period is quasi-abstract with atmospheric, rectangular figural forms floating in space as if looking at, and through, a window. Lucie-Smith notes in the catalogue that Neri's 'Approach to the figure became more personal with the advent of a model named Cara, whose heavy bosom and crooked back contributed to he…
The Israel National Museum. …e, weak American academic sculpture by Zorach and RICHARD Hunt, make up the rest. Fortunately a few acquisitions or loans of importance are also on view, notably two masterly Henry Moores, perfectly placed, a powerful Wotruba, a monumental iron structure by Cesar. A number of important artists, such as Arp, Uhlmann, Richier prove unsuited to the setting. The Israeli sculptors Dantziger, Shemi and Haber are moreimpressively at home in their native landscape. One aspect of the sculpture display is echoed in the small group of contemporary paintings in the Museum. This I can only describe as the too dominant influence of William Sandberg, the distinguished former Director of the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, who has been acting as special adviser to the Israel Museum. Sandberg, it is generally agreed, is one of the most brilliant, creative museum officials in the world, an educator and designer of exceptional talent. It is right that his views on modern art should be reflected in his work…
Roy Lichtenstein, <i>ART</i>, 1962. Oil on canvas. 91.4 x 172.7 cm / 
        39 x 71 x 4 inches. Gordon Locksley and Dr. George T. Shea Collection, 
        USA © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein/DACS 2004 …nce Alloway, together with and preceded by one by RICHARD Hamilton. Hamilton was quick to examine, in Lichtenstein's case, the issue of transformation, the rejection of the idea of composition, replaced by, 'the conflict of flatness and illusory space' that 'reveals a superficial concern with style. It is a curious fact that these obsessions, a baroque love of decoration and a delight in illusion, often go together. In any essentially mannerist art it is in the extremity of the stance that the glory lies. Lichtenstein is marvellously extreme.'1 In 1974, Frank Whitford expressed the view that Lichtenstein's comic book paintings had been largely misunderstood. 'To explain the qualities of Lichtenstein's paintings by contrasting them with their [comic-book] sources in the light of conventional aesthetics misses the point: Lichtenstein had uncovered an underestimated, misunderstood and largely overlooked fund of exciting imagery and had introduced it to a wider public by celebrating it in…
Exhibition view, exterior …n continues until the end of March. RICHARD Carr …
Deb Covell.  Fold 1. Acrylic paint, 23 x 18cm;  Back Flip Acrylic paint, 26 x 21cm; Double Edge. Acrylic paint, 33 x 23cm. Photograph: Cathal Carey. … material sense. I love the work of Robert Ryman, RICHARD Serra and Robert Morris. The list is very long, but I feel truly thankful to these artists who have helped guide me in my own particular direction. AMc: You’ve just finished a residency at Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art (mima). How did this come about and how has it furthered your career and discipline? DC: I was delighted to be invited by mima to take part in its first open studio residency. I was looking for a space to develop my ideas, particularly about installation and to make larger pieces that I couldn’t do because of the size restrictions in my studio. mima offered me the space to do this and saw the potential of turning it into an open studio situation, where the public could come in and see how an artist works first hand. This is something mima had never done before so I really appreciate the trust it put in me. It was a great experience and helped clarify some of my ideas and let me think a…
HouseofBooks_b.jpg …irector), Wim Wenders and Peter Handke (writers), RICHARD Reitinger (screenwriter) 3. Janet Cardiff & George Bures Miller: The House Of Books Has No Windows (Volume I, selected works), The Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh, Modern Art Oxford, 2008, p.14 4. Ibid, p.16 …
Jock McFadyen at The Royal Academy of Arts Summer Exhibition 2019 hang. Photo: Juliet Rix. …and Isaac Julien, as well as starchitects such as RICHARD Rogers and Norman Foster; we’ve got David Adjaye – what’s uncool about him?  Our honoraries include Jeff Koons, Anselm Kiefer, Ed Ruscha … the whole gang of the contemporary art world. People who are snooty about the Summer Exhibition are labouring under a misconception. It makes me quite angry, actually. We have a growing number of very serious artists, non-RAs (some selling for hundreds of thousands of pounds) sending their work in. The time has come for the show to shed its image. Critics should be eager to know what our top contemporary artists think is worth seeing. JR:  What about the amateur element? JM: In Turner’s day, the RA exhibition was Academicians and non-Academicians, but they were all professionals. I don’t dislike amateur art – Alfred Wallis is a great artist, from amateurism can come great professional artists – but I think the position of the professional artist is very different.…
George O Donnell (active 1823–1852). <em>Patent Model for Button Joint Tilter,</em> 1852. Mount Lebanon, New York. Collection of Jane and Gerald Katcher …ll, who provided the funds for the trip; his son, RICHARD; and James Shepherd and Mary Partington) to America. In 1776, Hocknell bought land for the community at Niskayuna, New York, in the township of Watervliet near Albany. In America, Lee's mystical presence drew converts as well as enemies. A missionary trip through New England during the period 1781-1783 wore Lee down. She died at age 48 in September 1784 in Watervliet. While her charismatic personality, alternately motherly and fearsome, was certainly the glue holding her movement together, the credit for the society's effective organisation begins with her hand-picked successor, James Whittaker (1751-1787). Whittaker worked tirelessly to establish 'Gospel Order' in nearly every facet of Shaker life.3 Classic Shaker design was a physical manifestations of zealously pursued ideals: an essential simplicity devoid of superfluous detail, cleanliness as a route to godliness (peg rails were installed on the walls so that…
Broche Oiseau libéré, Cartier Paris, 1944. Or, platine, diamants taille rose, un cabochon de saphir, lapis-lazuli, corail. Collection Cartier. Photograph: Nick Welsh, Collection Cartier © Cartier. …ace given to her by her fifth (and sixth) husband RICHARD Burton; the tiara Catherine Middleton wore for her wedding to Prince William; jewels made for Princess Grace of Monaco, and a 23.6ct Williamson pink diamond set in a flower brooch for Queen Elizabeth II. Wallis Simpson, too, had a number of pieces commissioned when she was exiled in Paris, and rejected by the British Royal family: an exquisite scattering of amethysts, diamonds and sapphires; a brooch the shape of a flamingo, a panther made of diamonds.  It is all quite extravagant, and yet writing about jewellery – or jewellery written about – is far more attractive and exciting than the jewels themselves. The stories behind the gems – the romances, the inferiority complexes, the charisma of Taylor playing to the camera in a gift from Burton – are entertaining and interesting. The jewels, when displayed on black velvet, behind glass, with security guards, are less so. They have become rocks again, devoid of glamour…
Dexter Dalwood. The Poll Tax Riots, 2005. Private collection. © The Artist and Simon Lee Gallery, London & Hong Kong. …at provide moments of respite from the confusion. RICHARD Hamilton’s The Citizen is a masterpiece of moody political painting. A barefoot prisoner with a beard and long black hair looks out from the canvas; the brown patterns behind him represents excrement smeared on the walls. Is he a mad man or a messiah? He is, in fact, an IRA prisoner. In protest at being classified by the British government as criminals, rather than political prisoners, the inmates stepped up their protests in the 1970s. They took to wearing blankets instead of prison uniforms and lived in squalor. Hamilton painted three such diptychs of the conflict in Northern Ireland and the complete set would have provided a dramatic highlight to this exhibition. In the same room as The Citizen hangs The Death of Captain James Cook, 14 February 1779 (c1798) by the German painter Johann Zoffany. A dynamic piece that was never finished, it imagines the moment Cook was killed by a group of Hawaiians in a confrontation on a be…
…ture to advise on government policy. RICHARD Carr top …
…s Picasso, Gauguin, Raoul Dufy, Jacques Lipchitz, RICHARD Guino, Auguste Rodin, Diego Giacometti as well as Renoir himself. With such a stellar line-up, it is not surprising that the gallery attracted mobs of visitors, although Emmanuel Javogue said he was surprised by the enthusiasm shown by the crowds. (Image 3) Javogue had other reasons to feel satisfied. At the end of the fair, the main organizer of the event, the Shanghai Cultural Development Foundation, acquired a Renoir and Guino's 'Tete de la grande venus' (1915) plus a drawing by Picasso, to add to its rapidly expanding collection of Western art. Emmanuel Javogue also made a bit of a splash of his own, promising that his company would donate a new cast of Rodin's 'Le Penseur' next year. In a similar vein, the Shona Gallery sold two paintings by the artist Ken Freeman, depicting scenes of the American West. It also donated the rest of the paintings it brought to the fair - around 20 - to the Shanghai Red Cross. Among other bi…
Channa Horwitz. Time Structure Composition III, Sonakinatography I, 1970. Casein paint on graph paper. Courtesy Estate of Channa Horowitz. Photograph: Timo Ohler. …ckne Krebs, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, RICHARD Serra, Tony Smith, Andy Warhol and Robert Whitman. While Horwitz was a contemporary of some of these artists, it was only during the final few years of her life that her work began to be featured in international exhibitions such as the Whitney Biennial, New York, 2014 and the Venice Biennale, 2013. Even this show at Raven Row, three years after her death at the age of 80, is only the second iteration of her first large-scale solo show at an institution. The upstairs floors at Raven Row show later works, from the mid-70s and 80s, characterised by an intense and magnified focus on the pictograms outlined in earlier works. In the Canon series, the pictograms grow into voluminous patterns that stretch kaleidoscopically across the paper with a fascinating energy. The effect of these later works, while mathematical and achieved through simple equations and the addition of numbers and distances, is also very liberated and free. In …
François Morellet in his studio, Cholet. Courtesy The Mayor Gallery, London. …ted by Bill. I can still hear the great voice of [RICHARD] Lohse, saying to me with rolled Rs: “Morellet, stay hard!” [a reference to hard-edge painting]. ARC: It’s a commonplace that many artists of the New Tendenciesrejected the “expressive” lyrical abstraction of the 50s. You recount an amusing recurring nightmare you had in the 50s, at the height of Action Painting and Art Informel, in which, to your horror, you would produce picture after picture “swimming in the syrup of Informel”. What repulsed you so much about that kind of art? FM: Apart from the (in)formal aspect of lyrical abstraction, the star artists of this hegemonic movement of postwar Paris represented, as far as I was concerned, the acme of the mystification of the status of the artist: inspired, a genius who was a medium for a great beyond, a creator of “lived” works. In other words, everything that made me break out in hives at that time. Even as a small boy, I was allergic to school and teachers…
John Powers with his grandmother in front of Terminal, 2004. Image courtesy John Powers. …lation.) But still the term rubbed me wrong. When RICHARD Serra, a sculptor I admire, declared in 2007 that his work Band was site-specific to both the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, I felt the term had gone from art-theory dog-whistle to false flag. AMc: What are you working on next? JP: Small stuff. • Lanchals can be seen at the Bruges Triennial until 16 September 2018.…
Martin Clark, Beatrice Gibson, Mark Fell and Steven Claydon. Art Sheffield, 2016. Photographs: Martin Kennedy. …rom Hannah Sawtell, Steven Claydon, Mark Fell and RICHARD Sides.   As with every biennial, the idea is not just to reflect aspects of the local and parochial, but to amplify the host city’s presence on the global art stage. And the work is a mixture of the specific and the universal, the local and the international. At polar extremes, in this respect, are the works by Mark Fell and Beatrice Gibson. Mark Fell’s Structural Solutions to the Question of Being is being exhibited at The Link pub on the Park Hill housing estate. Fell, who describes himself as a “Rotherham-based music producer and artist”, brings a wealth of local knowledge to this site-specific installation: a loving recreation, in a derelict brutalist housing estate pub, of the heady days of the 1980s and 90s underground music scene, as well as a far from rose-tinted recollection of the politics of the day. Among the dangling, cheap chandeliers, the ruined wallpaper and flashing blue and red disco lights, Fe…
Matteo di Giovanni. <em>Virgin Annunciate</em>, 1474. © 2007 Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design. Gift of Robert Lehman (57.301). Photo: Erik Gould …al Gallery mounted a superb exhibition curated by RICHARD Morphet and under the aegis of Neil MacGregor entitled 'Encounters: New Art from Old', in which leading contemporary artists were invited to select a preferred historic work from the collection, and produce work of their own inspired by this. Notably, Sir Anthony Caro chose a single panel from Duccio's 'Maesta' entitled 'The Annunciation' (1311). (This and two other panels from the Maesta remain, as here, in the National Gallery's collection.) Caro's several 'Variations' on Duccio's work captured that exercise in spatial architectonics brilliantly, exploring the interplay between container and contained. Caro's 'Variations' are not a grand symphony; rather they express the spirit of Duccio in what is more of a chamber music suite. Furthermore, Duccio's work has encouraged Caro to explore the frontality of his sculpture as a direct reaction, a direction which continues. The lesson of the current exhibition is, how…
Martin Clark, curator, Art Sheffield 2016, talking to Studio International. Photograph: Martin Kennedy. …rom Hannah Sawtell, Steven Claydon, Mark Fell and RICHARD Sides. Art Sheffield 201616 April – 8 May 2016 Interview by VERONICA SIMPSONFilmed by MARTIN KENNEDY…
Renate Bertlmann talking to Studio International at the opening of Discordo Ergo Sum, Pavilion of Austria, Giardini, Venice, 2019. Photo: Martin Kennedy. … the State Gallery of Lower Austria in Krems. The RICHARD Saltoun Gallery has recently reissued her Tender Object photographs, showing inflated condoms paired in positions of seeming intimacy with each other, their surfaces glossy and lubricated, their colours DayGlo. [image10] Bertlmann first came to art-world attention in the 70s with a radical feminist practice, incorporating gendered objets trouvés into her sculptures, photography and performance. Fetish objects, typically associated with male fantasies (dildos, blow-up dolls) were deployed with wit and sensuality. She has said: “My works are an expression of fear combined with great lust, and the latter is frightening for those who don’t care to confront their own hidden desires.” These sentiments have renewed traction thanks to the #MeToo and gender equality movements. [image9] For the Venice Biennale, Bertlmann chose a dual presentation of works old and new. Inside the horseshoe-shaped structure of the Austrian pavili…
Bolivia, Paraguay and Argentina, Gemini 9, 5 June 1966, Large format vintage chromogenic print, on ‘A Kodak Paper’, 28.2 x 35.7 cm, NASA negative number S66-38317, Title and technical details in ink on verso. Courtesy Breese Little. …at was doubted for a while, but not forgotten. As RICHARD Branson prepares to send people into space commercially, that dream, and the aesthetics and styles along with it, could perhaps be within sight once more. The photographs, then, are nostalgic, as well as capturing the vision of a new future – both an old vision (of the 1960s) and the latest version. As Fitzgerald writes, again in the brilliantly perceptive The Great Gatsby, that cycle of vision and failure is perhaps beyond time, for all its concern with it: “As I sat there, brooding on the old unknown world, I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.”5 If we are in love with …
Celia Scott. <i>MJ</i>, l996. Sitter: MJ Long. Bronze, 33 x 20 x 20 cm. © the artist. …n the second room are the two American architects RICHARD Meier and Michael Graves, mediated by contemporary “guru” and fellow architect Peter Eisenman, with two further talents either side of him. In the sanctuary of the patio are four key figures: Leon Krier (architect, called here “the Polemicist”) with Alan Colquhoun (architect and critic). Opposite are his former partner John Miller and architect Edward Jones. It was Leon Krier who started the whole sequence with a commission for his own head, now appropriately standing in the Prince of Wales’ garden at Highgrove. It would be wrong to suggest that Celia Scott pays no regard to the long precedent of the sculpted head. Her head of Alan Colquhoun as an obsessive intellectual was partly inspired by a bust of the Roman senator Seneca.1 One could suggest too that John Cheere’s 18th century bust of Cicero in plaster2 conveys the same quality of intellectual enquiry, of which Scott would have been at least aware. Unlike Rodin…
Portrait of Jeanne Masoero, June 2015. Photograph: Will Lodge. …s work as lyrical abstraction. And I think it was RICHARD Humphreys, in a talk he gave at Tate, who spoke of the influence of music on Hilton’s work. So I associate lyrical abstraction with music. With flowing lines and pastoral colours. With spontaneity and movement. JM: Talking about music, I went to a convent school and we were taught Gregorian chant. It is absolutely beautiful because it has these phrases and then these long silences between them. There’s this circular rhythm. SH: Now that could relate to your work. JM: Yes, and Guy Brett has written about this.3 The spaces and the silences. And a kind of austerity as well. AMc: And the idea of discipline. JM: Yes, I think my work is about trying to find structures, which, in a way, border on order, and border on disorder as well – a kind of contained chaos. SH: It must have been a very regular kind of education in a convent. JM: Well, yes, we learned Latin and Gregorian chant and not much else, really. No science w…
Tracey Emin. My Bed, 1998. Mattress, linens, pillows, rope, various memorabilia, 79 x 211 x 234. Saatchi Gallery, London. © The Artist …y, she has received her share of vitriol as well. RICHARD Dorment, critic of The Telegraph, described her Venice Biennale exhibition as the worst exhibition he had seen in 22 years. The Edinburgh retrospective is in fact disappointing, in spite of its importance. Emin is as much a writer as a visual artist: words feature prominently in much of her work. Her appliqué blankets, for example, are graphic banners - they hark back to the feminist revival and celebration of quilt making in the 1970s, as well as the political arena of protest marches, and grassroots participation. Slogans not poetry, placards not paintings, they also belong in the world of 'outsider art' as do her personal memoirs. Much of her work - where she employs a range of methods such as embroidery and etching, with a preoccupation with method, and which require skill - is rudimentary. Her embroideries are imperfect, like those of a young girl, large samplers in which to learn the different stitches. In Emin's life, l…
Dieter Rams, Design Museum. Photo: Luke Hayes. …009–7 March 2010 by RICHARD CARR The exhibition, Less and More - The Design Ethos of Dieter Rams, at the Design Museum in London is the first to present a definitive exposition of the career of Dieter Rams in the UK for more than 12 years. But Less and More could also have been called “How Braun regenerated the Modern Movement in Germany after the Second World War”. For, following the death in 1951 of W. Max Braun, who founded the company in Frankfurt in 1921, his two sons, Artur and Irwin, abandoned the radios with their mahogany cabinets and decorative flourishes and, instead, adopted a radically new design philosophy that was carried through to every aspect of the company’s activities – from its products to its graphics, advertising and exhibition design. This philosophy was generated with the help of Otl Aicher, who was a founding member of…
Michael Andrews. Lights VII: A Shadow, 1974. Acrylic on canvas, 182.9 x 182.9 cm (72 × 72 in). © The Estate of Michael Andrews, courtesy James Hyman Gallery, London. …spective. Curated by public-to-commercial migrant RICHARD Calvocoressi – who during Andrews’s life organised two of his solo shows – it continues Gagosian’s trend of tiptoeing into territory more usually occupied by state-subsidised museums. Earth Air Water even contains work loaned by the Tate collection, a sort of reversion of the museum sector’s regular borrowing from private owners. As potentially troublesome as this private incursion into public territory may be, from the perspective of the gallery-goer there is no doubt that this is a munificent trend. Earth Air Water is a diligently arranged survey of Andrews’ career. Four substantial rooms guide the viewer through the painter’s large-scale works, arranged by elemental theme and series; a connecting space and the lobby captures his earlier portraiture and party scenes; and the gallery’s offices provide a photographic window into his studio and circle. In each section, we thus enco…


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