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Callum Innes with Delft. Photograph: Veronica Simpson. …tting 20th-anniversary celebration for gallerists RICHARD and Florence Ingleby, given that he was present at their opening show in 1998. His deceptively simple, geometric works strike an appropriately calm, contemplative note. His well-established method of applying and then subtracting paint – in this case, loosening the oils with turpentine, and allowing serendipity as well as craft to dictate what patterns and striations emerge – speaks of long hours of patient labour, a stripping out of what is deemed unnecessary. These are the largest works Innes can make, given that his method depends on the smooth movement of paint across canvas, – one sweeping gesture, no more than an arm’s length. [image3] Where his watercolours can be quite ethereal, with colour removed as soon it is applied, the works created for this show continue a shift towards heavier layering. He tells me at the opening: “There are maybe eight layers that have been painted on them and then removed, so they h…
Agnes Denes. <em>Wheatfield – A Confrontation</em>, 1982. Two acres of wheat planted and harvested in Battery Park landfill, downtown Manhattan. Commissioned by Public Art Fund, New York City. 
Photograph: © Agnes Denes. 
Courtesy the artist. …neering efforts of Joseph Beuys, Robert Smithson, RICHARD Buckminster Fuller and others receive due attention, although the curators have decided against a chronological ordering, allowing the viewer to drift between historical and contemporary pieces and pick up the resonances between them as he or she wishes. The conjunction of the Barbican’s expertise in staging architectural displays and the subject of this exhibition is a happy one: from Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic domes, to Tomas Saraceno’s modular plastic balloons suspended in webbing and festooned with air plants, the gallery is filled with forms of architecture that propose other possible futures for the built environment. Along with Saraceno, this ‘new utopianism’ is espoused by the architectural collective EXYZT, who have built an off-site project on a piece of wasteland in Dalston, East London, constructing a working windmill that powers a flour mill and bread oven. Some of the most exciting architectural work…
<i>Office in a Small City</i> 1953. Oil on canvas 71.1 x 101.6 cm. The 
        Metropolitan Museum of Art, George A. Hearn Fund 1953. Photocredit@ Copyright 
        1989 The Metropolitan Museum of Art … In Degas - The Nudes (1988), RICHARD Thomson describes Degas' use of the nude: Degas found a consistent interest, even satisfaction, in the notion of the nude not as some aesthetic ideal of unearthly purity, but as the bodily articulation of psychological intensity.6 Specific details, both technical and narrative, in a Hopper drama are not required. Actual events often do not exist at all, and many interpretations can be made. A painting by Hopper presents a world over which the artist has almost total control, preconceived and ordered to create the illusion of reality. Hopper's desire was to reach a kind of plausibility, offering the minimum amount of information n…
Hedy Ritterman speaking at the exhibition opening for One man in his time, Jewish Museum of Australia 2016-2017. …lective: We Are Here, and your photographic work, RICHARD (2014) that won the Human Justice Award of the Blake Prize for Religious Art. Can you explain the connectivity between Jewish history and the memorialisation to Henry? HR: Jewish history underscores my work on an innate level, it informs my identity. I reflect on issues of community, of belonging and Jewish traditions, but particularly the history of survival and resilience and the valuing of life. The ideas of yiskor – to remember – are what all my work is about, although I believe this is universal to all cultures. JMcK: One man in his time has enabled you to reaffirm your life together, and the process has clearly achieved a greater harmony in artistic terms, as the work is elegant, minimal and haunting. What are you working on now? HR: Thank you. I feel I still have something to say when I de-install the exhibition in March next year. There will be elements of a new ritual in the packing up and divesting of t…
Installation view: Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 6, 2017—January 7, 2018. Photograph: Jill Spalding. …level that led the Guggenheim Museum’s director RICHARD Armstrong to pull all three works before opening. That the extent of public outrage was underestimated reveals how inured the art world inner sanctum has become to humanity’s threshold of decency. That the venerable New York Times called the Guggenheim “badly mistaken” for its “self-censoring” decision shows how far free expression has derailed to confound censorship with respect. Referencing as backup the Brooklyn Museum’s past refusal to pull The Holy Virgin Mary (1996), a work by British painter Chris Ofili involving elephant dung – a case of apples and oranges on a 10-to-one scale – only made the paper of record look fatuous. Wiser the position that prevailed in my small in situ survey: although the Guggenheim should have thought better of including material that presents abused animals as an art form, the ensuing public outcry, climbing to threats against staff, viewers, installations and the building itself…
Anni Albers in her weaving studio at Black Mountain College, 1937. Photograph: Helen M. Post. © The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, VEGAP, Bilbao, 2017. …l that form The Matter of Time (1994), an immense RICHARD Serra permanent installation on the lower floor of the museum. Another echo is found in With Verticals (1946), a pictorial weaving, where the blue verticals behind a zigzag of reds, a supplementary weft allowing for both a foreground and background, engender a real sense of movement, and recall the other site-specific work belonging to the Frank O Gehry building, namely Jenny Holzer’s scrolling red and blue LED words, Installation for Bilbao (1997). [image6] A number of Albers’s works themselves constitute hybrids of textile and text. The black-and-white Memo (1958) and Open Letter (1958) have the appearance of letters, or, at the least, some form of calligraphy to be deciphered horizontally, their repeated “graphemes” and loops, which echo those of shorthand, carriers of encoded information. The large tapestries Orchestra I, II, III (1983-4), on the other hand, seem to represent a visual form of music – individual n…
Shirazeh Houshiary. Allegory of Sight, 2015. Cast painted stainless steel, 43 x 120 x 43 cm. © the artist. Courtesy Lisson Gallery, London. …ng her sculptural contemporaries Anish Kapoor and RICHARD Deacon as a major modern artist at the peak of her career.  …
Fausto Melotti. Carro delle illusioni, 1984. © Archivio Fausto Melotti, Milan. Photograph © Daniele De Lonti, Milan. … invited Melotti to work in the porcelain factory RICHARD-Ginori. Melotti worked there on the figures inspired by Cycladic culture; his figures bearing a striking resemblance to the sculptures of the early bronze age Greek islands in the Aegean sea. Cycladic figures were female nudes, often with their arms folded across their abdomen; they were found in graves, and the originals were painted in bright colours. In formal terms, they appeal to the modernist sensibility in their highly stylised representations of the human form. There is no consensus regarding the precise meaning of Cycladic art, just as with the work of Melotti. While alluding to the archetypal form of human experience, they appear to represent mother nature and ritual worship: they can be seen to function as an accompaniment to death; they are puppet figures or dolls suggestive of an important theatrical role representing at once the nurturer and femme fatale. In the 30s, Melotti gravitated to the artists and intellectu…
Michelle Stuart. Sacred Solstice Alignment, 1981-2014. Archival inkjet photographs from analog black and white, approx 36.25 x 69.75 in. Photographs taken in 1981. Photograph: Bill Orcutt. Courtesy the artist and Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects. …ns on Photography by Roland Barthes translated by RICHARD Howard. Hill and Wang, The Noonday Press, New York, 1981.…
Claude Lorrain. <em>Ascanius Shooting the Stag of Sylvia,</em> 1682. Oil on canvas, 120 x 150 cm. 

        Inscribed: <em>CLAVDIO. I. V. F. A ROMAE 1682 Come. Ascanio. saetta il. Cervo di Silvia figliuola di Tirro lib. 7. Vig.
and CLAVDIO ROM</em>. 

© Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford. …hteenth century followers. In England the painter RICHARD Wilson after visiting Rome painted in a manner of Claude, but quite distinctly and opportunistically to supply English landowning clientele with the provenance they wanted in remoulding their landscaped parks, demolishing villages in the way. By employing Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown to establish a new landscape tradition, which disavowed formal “French” gardens, earth-moving and excavating even lake-making anew (water offered this clientele also opportunities for wildfowling, a factor not much commented upon by historians). And soon the “English Garden” was spreading across Central and Northern Europe, from Russia to Denmark to Germany itself. It became the embodiment in fact of the Enlightenment philosophy of the sublime and the beautiful in visual terms. It all began, not so much with the philosophers Burke and Kant, but with Claude. References 1. See catalogue Gerhard Richter: Panorama to the same exhibition, Ta…
Wendy Elia. Maxime, 2010. Oil on canvas, 166 x 91 cm. Courtesy East Contemporary Art Collection, University of Sussex. Photograph: Mac Campeanu …beit here she was talking about the fairy painter RICHARD Dadd. Come Unto These Yellow Sands: Four Radio Plays by Angela Carter, published by Bloodaxe Books, 1985, page 24. 4. Cited by Scott A Dimovitz in his paper What Then? Apocalypticism and Carter’s Surrealist Aesthetics, given at Fireworks: The Visual Imagination of Angela Carter, a conference to accompany the exhibition, held at the RWA and the Arnolfini, 9-10 January 2017, as well as in his book Angela Carter: Surrealist, Psychologist, Moral Pornographer, published by Routledge, 2016, page 36. 5. As suggested by Anna Watz in her paper at Fireworks (ibid), Mannequins of Desire: Angela Carter, Cindy Sherman and Surrealism. 6. Contemporary Art and the Continuing Influence of Angela Carter by Fiona Robinson. In: Strange Worlds: The Vision of Angela Carter, edited by Fiona Robinson and Marie Mulvey-Roberts, published by Sansom & Co, 2016, pages 66-69.…
The Weston, Yorkshire Sculpture Park designed by Feilden Fowles. Photo: Peter Cook. …s of the 1960s and 70s, such as Robert Morris and RICHARD Long, the idea of carving landmarks into the ground, working with contours. There’s such a rich history of the geology of the area. We wanted to bring the layers through into this monolithic wall.” Consequently, the aggregate used in the concrete is drawn from local quarries – a mixture of sandstone, limestone and granite - and boulders from the quarry itself are deployed in the rock-garden-inspired landscaping. The walls also hide a pioneering environmental control feature: between the concrete layers are 10,000 unfired clay bricks that moderate the temperature and humidity of the gallery. This hugely reduces the building’s energy requirements – there is only passive ventilation throughout the building, except in the kitchen area. [image11] The architects were also playing with the idea of plinths. And the building’s southern, park-facing elevation does appear to sit on a long, pale platform, thanks to the simple…
Postcard from God, 1976, oil on canvas, 110 x 104 cms … artists. In Britain, the work of RICHARD Hamilton, American-born Ron Kitaj and Eduardo Paolozzi all approached ad/mass imagery from an analytical and critical perspective.8 For Ken Done, art in a world dominated by mass media falls into distinct categories; design work, or art for a wide audience which uses the means of industry and technology or painting as a primal activity, on which human marks are tantamount. The act of painting links human activity through the centuries, from cave painting onwards. Since the 1970s, Australian, Aboriginal culture has become well known around the world. No white artist working in Australia could remain unaffected and unmoved by Aboriginal art and culture, or by the pathos, drama and tragedy of the experiences of Indigenous Australians since White sett…
Born to Kill helmet, original prop from the film Full Metal Jacket. Photo: Ed Reeve, courtesy of the Design Museum. …lyn Rudman. I am married to a wonderful man named RICHARD. He is a broadcast engineer. He is the chief engineer for two broadcast stations here in Los Angeles. Our marriage has been like a dream come true and I am very, very happy.” Haunting, for the way in which Rudman’s narrative echoes that of Lolita. When Lolita eventually escapes Humbert and Quincy, when she escapes from the promise of money, urbanity and fame her two abusers offer in exchange for her body, she settles down to a modest life as a housewife – with a man named Dick.…
Anish Kapoor. <em>When I am Pregnant</em>, 1992.

Mixed media, variable measurements. Courtesy the artist and Lisson Gallery, London. <em>© OOA-S, o.s</em> …ctorialist, František Drtikol (1883–1961), and RICHARD Pollak-Karlin (1867–1943), whose works, although reminiscent of Old Master religious tableaux with their angels and virgin-like figures, retain a sketchy finish, thus leaving them merely suggestive of the image, and more spiritually evocative. The repetition of shapes and patterns – especially diamonds – is a precursor of abstraction, and critical to Steiner’s proposed process of inner development, whereby one must first imagine (by focusing on symbolic patterns, images, and mantra), then be inspired (by transcending the imaginative pictures and becoming aware of the meditative activity itself), and finally reach the stage of intuition (direct contact with the spirit). The main exhibition of contemporary works begins with a couple by Anish Kapoor (born 1954). Untitled (2007) is a large transparent cube encasing a floating object – is it a brain, a cell, a jellyfish? – itself exuding bubbles. Its suspended nature cap…
Grayson Perry speaking to the press at the opening of the Royal Academy of Arts 250th Summer Exhibition. Photograph: Martin Kennedy. …nknowns exhibited in these rooms as famous names (RICHARD Long, Cornelia Parker, Fiona Banner et al), the quality suddenly seems to level out and cohere into something far more consistent and consistently interesting. There is a handful of sculptures, too, including one of a young girl, leaning forward with a tottering pile of books, by Yinka Shonibare, called Young Academician. The sculpture is a tribute to all the RA’s female members (there are currently only 26 female Royal Academicians out of 79, or 36 out of 125 in total when Senior Academicians are added into the mix.) but new Academicians can only be appointed when old ones die, so parity will inevitably take time). [image16] Across the bridge into the new Burlington Gardens spaces, the McAulay Gallery is Perry’s “room of fun”, although the fun feels strangely diluted thanks to its forced ubiquity, compared to the richness and contrasts of his main gallery curation. There is a titter-worthy wall of “news” by David …
Contemporary Drawing: Recent Studies …e immediate way than any other expression of art. RICHARD Serra made the famous statement: 'There is no way to make a drawing - there is only drawing'. In the same interview he stated, 'Anything you can project as expressive in terms of drawing - ideas, metaphors, emotions, language structures - results from the act of drawing'. For Serra and many artists of his generation, 'Drawing is a verb'.10 Hoptman is keen to show the development of drawing from the position stated by Serra: This celebration of drawing's perpetual state of becoming made for a rich flowering of work in the late 1960s and early '70s, when the materiality of the art object underwent a profound reassessment. Freed from the confines of the page, drawing seemed to be everywhere - in scarifications of the landscape, in site-specific installations, in performance. The actions that went into these works - actions like scratching, scattering, walking - manifested a kind of drawing, but even as artists engaged in these m…
Queen Elizabeth I (The Ditchley portrait) by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger. © National Portrait Gallery, London. …irst Tudor king and the man who famously defeated RICHARD III at the Battle of Bosworth, ending the Plantagenet reign. In what is the National Portrait Gallery’s oldest painting, he peers out of the picture, his hands resting on a ledge as if he has just popped up at a window, a red rose in his hand and a disquieting half-smile on his face. This image, painted by an unknown Flemish artist, was sent to an Austrian duchess when the king was considering remarrying, but seemingly failed to impress as no wedding took place. Nearby sits a sallow bust of Henry made from a plaster death mask. It once formed part of a life-size effigy made for the king’s funerary procession and depicts the dead monarch with an uncanny realism, the likes of which had not been seen before in English portraiture. His cheeks are sunken, his neck sinewy and creased, his heavily hooded eyes painted as if open, but he is still eerily recognisable from his nearby painted portrait. Henry VII’s more robust and bo…
Richard Hamilton, <em>Hers Is a Lush Situation</em>, 1958. © Richard Hamilton. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2010. …g symbol, the car, is provocatively manifested by RICHARD Prince’s totemic Elvis (2007), the carcass of a dream car mounted on a plinth. Another memorable car-themed work comprises two snapshots of floral tributes to the dead Princess Diana from Jeremy Deller’s Another Country (the Mall 3/9/97) (2009). Jeff Koons’s altered porno shot, Couple (Dots) Landscape (2009) emblematizes Ballard’s notion of the “death of affect”, the emotional numbing caused by over-exposure to mediated imagery. Ballard’s theme of entropy is invoked by the amazing Untitled (2009) by Roger Hiorns, a hanging engine block sprouting blue crystals; and cleverly there’s a photograph by Tacita Dean that Ballard himself wrote about in relation to Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty (1970). Meanwhile, notions of inner space proliferate across a range of works by Edward Hopper and Dan Holdsworth (his twin photographs of an uncanny night highway) and by Mike Nelson whose walk-in structure, Preface to the 2004 …
Linda Stupart. A Spell to Bind All-Male Conference Panels, 2016. Performance (with salt circle, projection, remote controlled candles, felt, myrrh, thread, Tupperware box). Arcadia Missa. …;s a spell to bind [American minimalist sculptor] RICHARD Serra, but binding spells don’t send out negative energy. They are not hexes, and there’s a difference between binding and doing harm. A Spell to Bind Straight Cis White Artists from Profiting off of Appropriating Queer Aesthetics and Feminine Abjection, 2016. Performance at Transmission, London, 2016. IS: To bind someone is to hold them back, to restrain them from entering your zone. Is magic, then, a means of creating safe space? LS: Before I started working with magic and spells, I was thinking a lot about safe spaces. I began to cast salt circles before I had done much research into magic and witchcraft. I was watching Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Charmed on TV and  saw the film The Craft, and all my knowledge initially came from them. I cast a salt circle as a way to create my own space. I get anxious when people get too close to me, and the salt circle was in a sense pragmatic. I simply wanted the sp…
Leon Kossoff. <em>From Poussin: The Triumph of Pan</em>, 1998. Private collection © Leon Kossoff …he nature of the medium. In his essay on Kossoff, RICHARD Morphet writes: Since at least the 1960s, Kossoff has been widely admired for the strength and distinctiveness of his drawing. Nevertheless in 1987, nearly forty years after starting to draw there, he stated: 'In my work done in The National Gallery and elsewhere from the work of others I have always been a student. From the earliest days when I scribbled from the Rembrandts in the Mond Room my attitude to these works has always been to teach myself to draw from them, and, by repeated visits, to try to understand why certain pictures have a transforming effect on my mind. In the copies, made in the studio, I have always tried to remain as faithful as I was to the original, whilst trying to deepen my understanding of them. I have always regarded these activities as quite separate from my other work and only once, a long time ago, have I consciously used one of these works in the making of one of my own pictures.11 …
Manuel Neri. <em>La Palestra no. 3</em>, plaster with dry pigment, steel armature, polystyrene and burlap, 30 x 51 x 17.5 in. …s of California's Bay Area, including David Park, RICHARD Diebenkorn, Elmer Bischoff, Joan Brown and Nathan Oliveira. Neri's signature material is plaster, which he loves. 'La Palestra No. 3' is an example of Neri's plaster sculpture with dry pigment, steel armature, polystyrene and burlap. As he has said, 'It's cheap. You can do anything with it. You can keep adding to the figure. If you don't like what you have, you can start over. And I love that dead white'. Despite this, he has always made extensive use of colour. Included in the exhibition was a group of drawings from the 1950s that depicted standing female figures, seen singly or in pairs. A group of drawings from the same period is quasi-abstract with atmospheric, rectangular figural forms floating in space as if looking at, and through, a window. Lucie-Smith notes in the catalogue that Neri's 'Approach to the figure became more personal with the advent of a model named Cara, whose heavy bosom and crooked back contributed to he…
The Israel National Museum. …e, weak American academic sculpture by Zorach and RICHARD Hunt, make up the rest. Fortunately a few acquisitions or loans of importance are also on view, notably two masterly Henry Moores, perfectly placed, a powerful Wotruba, a monumental iron structure by Cesar. A number of important artists, such as Arp, Uhlmann, Richier prove unsuited to the setting. The Israeli sculptors Dantziger, Shemi and Haber are moreimpressively at home in their native landscape. One aspect of the sculpture display is echoed in the small group of contemporary paintings in the Museum. This I can only describe as the too dominant influence of William Sandberg, the distinguished former Director of the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, who has been acting as special adviser to the Israel Museum. Sandberg, it is generally agreed, is one of the most brilliant, creative museum officials in the world, an educator and designer of exceptional talent. It is right that his views on modern art should be reflected in his work…
Roy Lichtenstein, <i>ART</i>, 1962. Oil on canvas. 91.4 x 172.7 cm / 
        39 x 71 x 4 inches. Gordon Locksley and Dr. George T. Shea Collection, 
        USA © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein/DACS 2004 …nce Alloway, together with and preceded by one by RICHARD Hamilton. Hamilton was quick to examine, in Lichtenstein's case, the issue of transformation, the rejection of the idea of composition, replaced by, 'the conflict of flatness and illusory space' that 'reveals a superficial concern with style. It is a curious fact that these obsessions, a baroque love of decoration and a delight in illusion, often go together. In any essentially mannerist art it is in the extremity of the stance that the glory lies. Lichtenstein is marvellously extreme.'1 In 1974, Frank Whitford expressed the view that Lichtenstein's comic book paintings had been largely misunderstood. 'To explain the qualities of Lichtenstein's paintings by contrasting them with their [comic-book] sources in the light of conventional aesthetics misses the point: Lichtenstein had uncovered an underestimated, misunderstood and largely overlooked fund of exciting imagery and had introduced it to a wider public by celebrating it in…
Exhibition view, exterior …n continues until the end of March. RICHARD Carr …


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