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<i>Panton Chair</i> by Verner Panton, 1967 …8 March-14 May 2006. RICHARD Carr …
Michael Landy as St Jerome, 2012. © Michael Landy, courtesy of the Thomas Dane Gallery, London / Photograph: The National Gallery, London. …ference 1. “Michael Landy in Conversation with RICHARD Cork,” in Colin Wiggins, Michael Landy: Saints Alive, publication to accompany the exhibition, National Gallery Company Ltd., 2013.  …
Unknown. Envelope from Victoria to UK, 1st March 1869–69. 6.8 x 12.1 cm (envelope). Private collection, Victoria. …t, Oliver Goldsmith, inspired three other works - RICHARD Redgrave's 'The Emigrant's Last Sight of Home' (1858), Joseph Severn's 'The Deserted Village' (1857) and Thomas Falcon Marshall's 'Emigration - the Parting Day' (1852). Other aspects of the emigrant's experience follow: 'Women and Children Last' where Frank Holl's painting 'Gone!' (c.1887) clearly demonstrates the plight of the women and children left behind; 'The Voyage', where displayed objects augment the images of shipboard experience, ranging from sketching, shipboard games and quilt-making to braving the perils of shipwreck; then 'The Arrival'; 'From a Distant Land' and finally 'The Pioneer'. In the section, 'From a Distant Land', an intriguing trilogy of images can be found: Harden Sidney Melville's work entitled 'The Squatter's Hut: News from Home' (1850-51); Thomas Webster's 'A Letter from the Colonies' (1852) and David Davies' 'From a Distant Land' (1889). These paintings display the importance of maintaining links wit…
<p>Pablo Picasso. <em>Still life with Guitar</em>, variant state, Paris, assembled before November 15, 1913. Subsequently preserved
by the artist.
Paperboard, paper, string, and painted wire installed with cut cardboard box,
overall: 30 x 20½ x 7¾ in (76.2 x 52.1 x 19.7 cm).
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the artist …itar works, Head of a Man given just last year by RICHARD Zeilser. Curiously, though, the curators resisted including the famous Glass of Absinthe from Spring 1914, which is on show in the museum upstairs, and has various affinities with the aforementioned picture. There are also wonderful original vintage photographs of the works in the studio, blown-up on the wall as well, and a very useful didactic explanation of the various techniques and materials used here by Picasso. Of these, foremost, of course, was “collage”, which it is hard to imagine had seemingly never existed before, created for the very first time by Picasso in March 1912, its centenary looming, and now a sprawling genre in itself. The newspaper collages now appear as elegant and sophisticated as they must have then seemed scrappy and crude, the survival, even legibility, of these ancient slices of cheap newsprint surely miraculous. Indeed for the print-fetishists amongst us who will even read the morning cornflak…
Whitney Museum. Photograph: Miguel Benavides. …n (I kid you not) and last major work by the late RICHARD Artschwager. If you wish to follow the Whitney narrative, start on floor eight, and prepare to be dazzled. Every angle of show space and each work displayed has been thought and rethought for maximum impact. The works on paper (which form more than half the museum’s holdings), as well as the smaller paintings, are, by and large, hung in the eye-level linear tradition, though temporary walls have been thrown up to break the rhythm, mark transitions or feature standouts. Piano has honoured the Whitney’s brief of democracy by serving the viewers, artists, curators, security guards and city in equal measure. There are easy circulation patterns to prevent bottlenecks and conserve the energy spent figuring out which way to walk; there are clean, floodlit, uninterrupted wall-spaces, and the type of wide-plank pine flooring that is kind to feet. There is pause-a-moment bench seating by the indoor art to incline you to move on, and …
Pascale Marthine Tayou, Plastic Bags, 2019. Presented by Richard Taittinger Gallery, New York, and Galleria Continua, San Gimignano, Beijing, Les Moulins, Havana. Photo @ Mike Vitelli. …r of artists, such as Howard Hodgkin (1932-2017), RICHARD Diebenkorn (1922-1993), Raimonds Staprans (b1926) and Larry Poons (b1937). Marc Selwyn showed Remembrance Saturday with Marcia Scott (2013), a luminous painting by Frank Bowling (b1934). A noticeable, although perhaps incidental, feature of this year’s fair was the abundance of excellent drawings. In the Presents (new galleries) section, Selma Feriani Gallery from Tunis showed drawings by Massinissa Selmani (b1980, Algiers), from the series No Plan is Foolproof. Selmani’s delicate silhouettes of people, animals and things placed in barren surroundings show his figures as if caught unawares in the middle of some action, the meaning of which escapes us. Temnikova & Kasela from Tallinn presented the graphics of Olga Chernysheva (b1962, Russia), well-known for her humorous and masterful sketches of everyday-life events. In the main gallery section, Stephen Friedman included inimitable flower drawings by Jim Hodges (b1957, U…
…e summer, he contributed a perceptive analysis of RICHARD Hamilton's own reconstruction of Marcel Duchamp's 'The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors' (June 1966). Two years later, he led a somewhat historic discussion on 'The Relevance of Matisse' (July/August 1968), together with Howard Hodgkin and Phillip King. Forge drew attention to Matisse's lack of awareness of avant-garde, or being part of it: so anticipating the dispersal of such ideas by the 1970s. Forge's famous controversial article on 'de Kooning's Women' was published in December of that year - truly memorable. Forge was an original commentator; he was one of the first to champion the concept of the mixed show, and envisioned a mixed Biennale for London on such lines, putting the emergent Hayward Gallery on the map. This failed to develop as intended, perhaps because Forge had settled in New York in 1973, where he taught at Cooper Union. By 1975 he moved up to Yale as professor of painting, and dean and director of gradu…
Will Alsop. <em>Shipfish</em>. Metal, wood, plastic. …show and the Olympic build itself, was prominent. RICHARD MacCormac’s fine Kendrew Quadrangle for St John’s College, Oxford, (photo by Peter Durant) gave a taste of the high quality that Oxford and Cambridge Colleges still aspire to, but do not always achieve, but MacCormac certainly did. His scheme, built around an ancient college tree reminded one of his fine early Chapel for Fitzwilliam College Cambridge, which benefited from the same kind of tree vision in frame. Eric Parry’s Great Marlborough St Building façade, London was highly skilled. David Chipperfield somewhat uniquely, supplied an actual, meticulous working drawing of the west elevation of his new entrance building for the James Simon Gallery on Berlin’s Museum Insel (Island), welcome evidence of architectural finesse pre-construction. Such technically superlative means are still of course the practical reality of good architecture today – forming the basic codification of wha…
Annie Albers. <em>Black-White-Gold I</em> 1950. Pictorial weaving, 80 x 62.5 cm. Collection the Josef and Annie Albers Foundation. Photo Tim Nighswander. …nberg, Willem de Kooning, John Cage, Ray Johnson, RICHARD Buckminster Fuller and Merce Cunningham. The exhibition rooms are roughly divided into areas of mutual collaboration and influence - an appropriate attempt to organise such a variety of artists, given the interdisciplinary collaborations that the college fostered. One room is largely devoted to the work of Josef and Annie Albers, who held central positions at Black Mountain from 1933-49. They arrived shortly after their previous home, the Bauhaus, had been closed by Hitler, and brought with them that institution's emphasis on working from first principles, or starting at zero. Josef Albers, in particular, stressed the importance of a structured approach to experimentation, as illustrated by his 'Study for Variant' pieces on show: systematic manipulations of colour that pay close attention to the interplay of neighbouring fields. Annie Albers' textile works are given equal prominence, together with her striking jew…
Hideko Inoue, <em>The Hat, </em>2005<em>,</em> oil on canvas. …rt is very much alive. Irish photographic artist, RICHARD Mosse's large photographic prints of destroyed buildings make for striking images on the first wall of the gallery; winter fields seen through the hole of a shelled church in Kosovo and the exposed interior of an earthquake-ruined school in Bam are among the pictures imbued with a mixed sense of desolation and lyricism. The photographs seem less concerned with the events themselves, and more with the architecture that destruction leaves behind. In 'Untitled (Bosnia)', a shelled office block stands alone against a stormy sky, only the central spine of the staircase remaining. There are no people in the landscape, making it almost possible to forget the human misery that its creation entailed. Only a few years after disaster, the viewer is invited to see these as spaces where poetry is possible. One could see this as a testament to human endurance, or as exploitative of suffering. But perhaps such ethically loaded terms are inappr…
Douglas Gordon, 24 Hour Psycho, 1993. Video Installation. Dimensions variable. From Psycho, 1960, USA, directed and produced by
Alfred Hitchcock. Distributed by Paramount Pictures. © Universal City Studios. Photograph: Martin Kennedy. …een cemented since their shows at the gallery are RICHARD Long, who exhibited there in 1971, Sol LeWitt in 1973, Joseph Beuys in 1974, Donald Judd in 1995, Marina Abramović that same year, and Jake and Dinos Chapman in 2003. The gallery opened as Bear Lane Gallery in a former brewery on Pembroke Street, Oxford, in 1966; it became the Museum of Modern Art Oxford in 1974, and was unveiled as Modern Art Oxford – losing any hint of glass-case dustiness in favour of a simple edginess – in 2002, when Tracey Emin held a solo show at the gallery. This year’s anniversary celebrations, entitled Kaleidoscope, comprise a series of exhibitions throughout the year; each new show will replace the last gradually, so that during the transition guests can watch the installation of new pieces while they admire what remains of the previous exhibition. Complemented by several live performances in the gallery by the absurdist performance collective Dog Kennel Hill Project, the bold first show, The I…
Casey Kaplan's booth at the Dallas Art Fair which featured works by Giorgio Griffa and Matthew Ronay.  Photograph: Daniel Driensky. …n that is a focal point of the property. Works by RICHARD Phillips, Roger Hiorns, Tony Cragg and Brian Calvin, among others, populate the lobby and dining spaces. Down the road, hand-painted wall murals form the backbone of the Deep Ellum neighbourhood, where several independent, DIY art spaces have set up shop. [image2] During the fair, exhibitions on Theaster Gates and Laura Owens were on display (at Nasher Sculpture Center and Dallas Art Museum respectively), while solo shows by Eric Fischl, Harry Nuriev and Sara Rahbar filled Dallas Contemporary. Most intriguing of all was an exhibition by Adam Gordon, entitled The Grey Room, which was presented by the Power Station. Signalling the artist’s debut at an American institution, Gordon created various environments through five spaces within the gallery, which visitors experienced chronologically. The central portion of the installation demanded physical movement through rooms that were nearly pitch black, and which had been construc…
Jacques Mahé de la Villeglé. Jazzmen, 1961. Torn papers mounted on canvas, 217 x 177 cm. Installation view. Photograph: Jill Spalding. …ack, rattling despair. And acquaint yourself with RICHARD Serra’s weightless 1974 foray into video-speak (Boomerang) with a subject whose voice, echoed back to her, disrupts her ability to think. [image7] Meanings within meanings join graffiti to a dream-inducing cuneiform in Martin Wong’s Attorney Street (Handball Court with Autobiographical Poem by Piñero) (1982-84); Argentinian artist León Ferrari’s encrypted calligraphy piece has you reaching for a railing to lean on. And Jazzmen (1961), one of Jacques Mahé de la Villeglé’s terrific “torn” posters, viscerally communicates the aural and visual chatter that rocked heyday Paris. Closest to hallucinatory are Henri Michaux’s mescaline drawings, an exercise in speed undertaken under the influence of peyote. [image3] Twisted, the final section, and the strongest, is apt for Leon Golub’s disembodied Vietnamese Head; for Birnbaum’s torturous extrication video, Chaired Anxieties: Skewed (1975); and for Lee Lozano’…
Anri Sala. Tlatelolco Clash, 2011 (still). Single-channel HD video, 5.0 surround sound, colour; 11:49 min. © Anri Sala. Courtesy kurimanzutto, Mexico City; Marian Goodman Gallery; Hauser & Wirth; Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris; and Kaikai Kiki, Tokyo. …k 3 February – 10 April 2016 by ANNE BLOOD In RICHARD Dehmel’s 1896 poem Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), two lovers walk through the forest under the clear light of the moon. Then, among the tall oak trees, the woman confesses a secret; she is pregnant with another man’s child. Despite the sadness caused by the confession, the man forgives her and offers to love the child, who he promises will be transfigured to become wholly their own. The emotional stages of Dehmel’s poem are reflected in Arnold Schoenberg’s composition of the same name, written in 1899. Originally composed for a string sextet, the piece begins with the anguish of confession, before moving on to evoke the man’s considered reflection, and concluding with the warmth of his compassion and her bright acceptance of his love. When it premiered on 18 March 1902, in the Vienna Musikverein, the work was heavily criticised both for its use of the “nonexistent” inverted ninth chord and for its explicit …
Christopher Wool. Head, 1992. Enamel on aluminium, 274 x 183 cm (107.8 x 72 in). Courtesy Astrup Fearnley Collection, Oslo, Norway. …ccupations, and a generous selection of work from RICHARD Prince brings its own strange form of comic relief. Prince stencils jokes, often lifted from copies of the New Yorker, on to monochromatic painted canvases. Throughout his career, Prince has raised intriguing questions about the line between plagiarism and “recycling”, recently running into controversy for exhibiting (and selling) large-scale printouts of other people’s Instagram posts. Their odd decontextualisation forces us to consider these bland, well-worn, Seinfeldian jokes in new, ambiguous lights. Similarly, the joke-like formulation of Holzer’s plaque, or the childish violence of Bruce Nauman’s flashing neon Double Poke in the Eye II (1985) helps to expose the hidden racial, sexual and violent impulses underpinning archetypical US humour and idioms. From the Vapor of Gasoline is a success, but not necessarily on all terms. The exhibition is a lively collection of works from a group of impressive and challengin…
…e moment, the omens are very mixed. RICHARD Carr Reference 1. Bain M. Architecture in Scotland 2004-2006: Defining Place. Glasgow: The Lighthouse, 2006. …
Tom McKinley. Morington Gardens House, 2016. Oil on panel, 43 x 77 in. Photograph: Jill Spalding. …ith every day, and a pristine collection of early RICHARD Diebenkorn works on paper. Striking, too, the new focus on historic material: responding to the dearth of fresh work, power dealers have been zeroing in on artists’ estates – Paul Kasmin won Lee Krasner’s, Lisson pried out Ray Colmer’s, Hauser & Wirth locked in Arshile Gorky’s. Sales, solid if not brisk, were on the order of a Kehinde Wiley bronze ($185,000 at Sean Kelly), a new Alex Katz painting ($550,00 at Thaddaeus Ropac), an early David Hockney drawing ($100,000 at Van de Weghe) and a Paul McCarthy sculpture ($950,000 at Xavier Hufkens). The only big-league dealers expressing disappointment were those who had sold wildly last year and were “suffering” by comparison. Not all thoughts of investment were left at the door. There was urgent interest in artists with flip-value (Mark Bradford, Marc Grosjean, Adrian Ghenie, Hernan Bas, Jonathan Meese), and in those coming off of and p…
<p>Martine Bedin. <em>Super Lamp</em>. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London. …ed monotone of Anderson’s voice. Photographs by RICHARD Prince and Cindy Sherman could have continued Anderson’s a potential narrative regarding loss of identity and unfixed individuality amid cultural permissiveness had they not been shown in a separate room among a dense display of magazines, advertisements and poster designs. Despite the curators’ declared intention to locate their concerns firmly outside of postmodernism’s social, political and economic environment, the final section of this show is nonetheless devoted to one particular facet of the postmodern condition: money. Yet this condition is approached through a confusing mixture of celebration – of the reinvention of crafted, saleable objects – and cynicism – for the prevalence of commodity culture  during the 1980s and postmodernism’s part-culpability in relation to this. If mass production and money culture was what Andy Warhol satirised in his Dollar Sign screenprint of 1980, which greets us as we …
D*Face. Love Struck. Enamel and pigment-based paint on canvas. Photograph: Jill Spalding. …ly fresh were acrylics on paper by Sam Francis at RICHARD Gray. Expert lighting picked out an Egyptian 26th-dynasty torso and at Vallois from Paris four burnished lacquer-on-metal vases by Jean Dunand. At Zwirner a suite of Josef Albers oil on Masonite square paintings seemed to emanate their own light. Belying “fair fatigue” and qualms about our fraying political superstructure, that dealers such as David Zwirner, Larry Gagosian and Marian Goodman booked large spaces both at Tefaf Spring and Frieze, testifies to the perceived health of the contemporary art market. That all remain cautious, nonetheless, was evidenced by the presence at all three fairs (besides top impressionists and in-the-pantheon Picasso, Matisse, Léger) of saleable artists; Josef Albers, Lygia Clark, Lucio Fontana, Wayne Thiebaud and Giorgio Morandi. [image14] [image15] Playing out on the fringe, although at the Armory Show-annointed Pier 94, Art New York pulled off the stunt of showing both the best and wo…
St Pancras Chambers (previously the Midland hotel), St Pancras station, London …en commissioned. Lansley, has been accompanied by RICHARD Griffiths (Architects/RHWL) in the restoration of the hotel itself. Also restored to the public eye and esteem are the original carefully selected materials specified by Scott himself: Grippe's patent Nottingham bricks, Ancaster Stone dressed-up and stonework shafts correctly interspaced in Aberdeenshire red and grey granite. The discreet, almost 'by stealth' manner in which the whole station complex has finally emerged from its chrysalis of renovation belies the real promotional truth that here at last is the world's greatest railway station, bar none. It might be claimed that Foster Associates' new Dresden Terminus had beaten it by a whisker, and it is an exceptional piece of design for a wholly bombed-out station. However, St Pancras exceeds on more than points. The Lansley team and their clients have achieved a most difficult synthesis, retaining the ethos of the first great age of the train, yet metamorphosing…
Christopher Williams. K-Line, Matt Dulling Spray, CFC Free … Studio Rhein Verlag, Düsseldorf, August 24, 2014. Private Collection, Germany. Image courtesy Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne and David Zwirner, New York/London. …artists such as Barbara Kruger, Cindy Sherman and RICHARD Prince. I knew that he has been a professor at the Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf since 2008, and that his works are held in collections at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney. I knew all of this, and this led me to assume that I would immediately be bowled over by the vast exhibition, that I would feel some sort of connection to the works, the space and, by association, the artist, but, alas, nothing. Absolutely nothing. Walking into the gallery, the visitor is met by something of an anti-gallery. Temporary panels stand with their wood and foam innards left naked, pencil marks and metal pins pockmark the permanent walls around them, and plaster is ripped away to reveal forgotten posters advertising previous exhibitions. It is a mess, an absolute mess. “A mess?” I hear you say. “Surely it is the work that is important?” The work? Of cou…
Ardengo Soffici. <em>BIF,</em> 1915. … Harwood, Jude Walker and Allen Fisher performing RICHARD Huelsenbeck, Marcel Janco and Tristan Tzara's simultaneous Dada poem 'L'amiral cherche une maison à louer' (A different version, with more whistles and bells, can be experienced via mp3 at http:www.ubu.com/sound/tzara.html.) There are interviews and reminiscences by Cendrars, Tzara and Gascoyne. There is music by Satie, Russolo, Schoenberg, Weill and Brecht, and - improbably but brilliantly - Talking Heads, whose 1979 track 'I Zimbra' incorporated lyrics from Hugo Ball's sound poem 'Gadji beri bimba'. And talking of sound poetry, the archive provides an excellent chance to revisit, or hear for the first time, some classics of the genre, including an extract from Schwitters's 'Ursonate' and Khlebnikov's 'Bobeobi' (though it must be said that these can also be found on the wonderful UbuWeb, as above). The exhibition develops by examining, in turn, more than 30 cities, which were centres or outposts for the avant…
…clients included London store, Liberty as well as RICHARD shops and Pretty Polly, and although some of Havinden's work showed that he was still keeping up with the times (a 1960s ad for Pretty Polly stockings makes references to the Pop culture then prevalent), other examples were beginning to look old fashioned, particularly when he used drawn images. Perhaps he was most at home during the 1930s, especially when he lived in Lubetkin's block of flats, Highpoint 2. Here, Havinden's own textile designs complemented works by Gabo, Calder and Hepworth. Perhaps, too, his career peaked when he worked on Simpson's new store, designed by Joseph Emberton and opened in 1936, because it demonstrated the belief in total design so close to Havinden's heart. Today Simpson's of Piccadilly no longer exists, altho…
Min-Kyu Choi …llege of Art. Working together with Simon Gue and RICHARD Frost their design took them to a wheelchair centre in Bangladesh. The centre was copying, with old water pipe, bicycle and tubing, hospital style wheel chairs, originally designed for returning American servicemen. Constantine explained: “it was a bit like scrap heap challenge, we went to the local market and found materials and redesigned the chair, making it simpler, more ergonomic, with an aesthetic that made it appealing to sit in.” Since those first designs, Motivation has made wheelchairs worldwide and is now providing flat packs with local training for construction and individual customisation. Constantine showed me a film of a chair fitting, “the fitted cushion is crucial”, he explained, “without it the paraplegic gets sores that turn into wounds”. Constantine summed up Motivation design: “We are about making good low cost solutions in different countries, and giving people the …
Outside Barajas Airport Terminal, Madrid. Photo credit: Katsuhisa Kida. … This month, the architect, RICHARD Rogers, has attained a summit point in his career in winning the UK RIBA Stirling Prize. The building that has won the prize is not even in Britain, but the architect very much is. The script for this career could never have been anticipated. One of the most interesting aspects is that early on in their careers, Rogers was in partnership with the equally successful architect, Norman Foster. On the face of it, no two architects could have come from a more different background. Foster, two years younger, comes from a working class background, forged through hard graft in Manchester. Before turning to architecture, he served two years' national service in the Royal Air Force. Rogers' cousin was the famous Italian architect Ernesto Rogers of Milan. After his own military service, Rogers, unlike Foster, might have been called unemployable at 20. He, therefore, took a foundation course at Epsom Coll…


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