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Eileen Gray …the result was very unsatisfactory. RICHARD Carr …
Nicholas Blowers. <em>Boulders descending through trees,</em> 2007. Oil on paper, 104 x 92 cm …camera flash'. And he quotes the Tasmanian writer RICHARD Flanagan: 'The particular agony of Tasmania is in the end neither environmental nor political, but spiritual, and it is in the end merely one end, a highly visible end of a continuum that extends from the muddy ash of the Styx valley to the blood spattered walls of Baghdad and the torture cells of Guantanamo Bay'. This artist is now seeking new sanctuaries out in the Tasmanian forest, uncovering and depicting 'collapse and decay… An impenetrable dark wall of trees may offer a glimpse of light some distance inward - often a huge gum has fallen, clearing a pathway. A fallen gum will have left a splintered trunk surrounded by splinters of shattered bark. I was recently standing on the trunk of a huge fallen tree and looking back at the trunk, it appeared a totally implausible form, unique and singular like a castle turret whose walls have splintered and fallen outwards'. Blowers says he continues …
Andy Warhol. Vote McGovern, 1972. Founding Collection, The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh © 2008 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts / ARS, New York. …fying picture stands out: Vote McGovern, in which RICHARD Nixon grimaces in horrific blue and nauseous green, with the yellowed eyes of a monster. This was Warhol’s contribution to the Democratic campaign, or at least a joke at Nixon’s expense. What is interesting about the selection here is that these figures conjure up their modern equivalents and the little-changed narratives and caricatures that dominate our TV screens today. Everything and nothing has changed, from one political era to another. Even the art that comments and enjoys the surrealism of politics has not moved on very much from the garish prints that Warhol created, in part due to the artist’s own power and populism. And that is what is perhaps the most fascinating aspect of this show – that the art trivialises the politics it paints. It reduces the grand theatre of the political stage to a crazy circus of impossible illusions. There is a detectable buzz and frisson about the show, from the crowds of Scots an…
Joe Winkleman, 2014. Photograph: Nick Howard. …ve produced and illustrated The SewaneePoems with RICHARD Tillinghast (winkelman.co.uk). Taking passages from his verses, I drew visual compositions on transfer paper to make a set of lithographic prints at the Curwen Studio in Cambridge. JMcK: If all art is, among other things, an exploration of self, and if art navigates an inner space, then your trees and rocks and mountains seem to me to celebrate the necessity of contemplation and the inexplicable aspects of life. Can you make reference to the Caves at Staffa etching? JW: I must confess to being romantic, in that my imagery is an expression of my emotional response to nature. I am consumed in observing the natural world and make my etchings with devotion to the subject using my utmost concentration, with what Auden called “intensity of attention”. I like to think that I am stating wonder as well as truths about what I take for my themes. I celebrate life through contemplation of extraordinary natural phenomena that are visua…
Tracey Emin. <em>Just Remember How It Was</em>, 1998. Monoprint on calico with stitching. Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art …Ray, Edward Weston, Stanley Spencer, John Bratby, RICHARD Avedon, Lucian Freud, Annie Leibovitz, Nan Goldin, Diane Arbus, Helmut Newton, David Bailey, Gilbert and George, Gerhard Richter, John Coplans, Robert Mapplethorpe, Wolfgang Tillmans, Marc Quinn and Sam Taylor-Wood. Among the works from these artists included in the exhibition is a selection of photographs from Lewis Morley, including 'Christine Keeler', an early example of a naked portrait circulated in the mass media, capturing the sexual allure of a figure at the centre of the Profumo scandal. Among the works from Tracey Emin is 'The Last thing I said to you', which demonstrates the artist's use of self-portraiture to convey a sense of vulnerability rooted in personal childhood experiences. Tracey Emin is also representing Britain at the Venice Biennale this summer (See the review on this website). The subject matter of the works includes men and women of varying ages, disabled and able-bodied, and from a wide range of ethn…
Fiona Banner. Photograph: Mischa Haller. …he extent that the incredible and vast Fulcrum by RICHARD Serra in Liverpool Street station has been so densely built around by un-giving corporate development that men now use it as a public urinal. Such huge public artworks become like territorial bollard art. KT: How did you experience the Occupy London Stock Exchange (LSX) camp, which was a protest against the banking system and the government’s response to the financial crisis in 2011-12?FB: The symbolism of Occupy being in front of St Paul’s was genius and very powerful. I wasn’t involved directly, but I spent a lot of time passing through the City at that time so I was very aware of it. What struck me was how Occupy itself ended up fracturing into power struggles and how the message drifted and became more convoluted. I think it got misunderstood as being a diatribe against the wealthy, but what the movement really had, in the best moment, was an opportunity to talk about the politics and power of the City. KT: Do you th…
P0994_b.jpg …estival planned for Dundee in 2010. RICHARD Carr …
Rusty Peters. Chinaman's Garden massacre, 2000. AGNSW, Purchased with funds provided by the JS Watkins Memorial Fund 2001. © Rusty Peters. Warmun Art Centre. Licensed by Viscopy, Sydney. …eter voices. In We Can Be Heroes (2014), artists RICHARD Bell (b1953, Brisbane) and Emory Douglas (b1943, Michigan) bring attention to the 1968 Mexican Olympic Games when the gold and bronze medallists in the men’s 200m, African Americans Tommie Smith and John Carlos, stood on the podium and demonstrated against continuing racial discrimination against black people in the US by raising their fists in the Black Power salute and, in a show of solidarity, the Australian silver medallist Peter Norman joined them, wearing an “Olympic Project for Human Rights” badge. Despite setting the Australian record for the men’s 200m race, winning a silver medal and making a powerful stand for human rights, Norman returned to Australia to widespread criticism and discrimination. Race in Australia was still contested at the time; until 1967, Aboriginal people were not even counted in the national census. Norman’s bravery was finally recognised by the Australian parliament in 2012, and the art…
Peter Wächtler. Far Out (2016). Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2016. Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery. Courtesy of the artist. Photograph: Andy Keate. …ish. There are obviously animators I admire, like RICHARD Williams who created Roger Rabbit. But people like him are true animators. They dedicate their lives to it and I do not see myself as an animator. I don’t have a studio or anything, so I don’t deal with any of this profession, its tradition and its teaching. I do admire the casual and pragmatic way of producing and handling drawings, very technical.  AG: I guess walking is one of the most repetitive things humans do, which fits tightly with your ideas about repetition? PW: Yes. You can put a lot into it with the speed, weight, etc. The walk is very telling and, traditionally, the walk is one of the first things to learn in animation. The very first I think is a bouncing ball.  AG: Could you talk more about the subtitles in the film? PW: The subtitles are like trolling. Like on the internet when people ridicule others. You know, when you have someone [me] singing so ambitiously with no skills on the film…
John Pawson, London. Photo Orla Connolly …r–30 January 2011 by RICHARD CARR The most celebrated of Mies van der Rohe’s aphorisms was Less is More and just how this principle can be taken to extremes is shown in the exhibition of work by John Pawson at the Design Museum in London. Mies, of course, was fond of expensive and exotic materials such as marble and onyx, and to Pawson the choice of materials is equally as important so that the visitor to the exhibition sits on benches reflecting his use of granite, marble, bronze and oak. But, though the environments created by Mies usually have a warmth and human quality created by his use of colour and choice of furniture and fittings (as in, for instance, the Tugendhat House in Brno), the interiors created by Pawson are spare and austere. In the case of his houses, one wonders what kind of people live in them; where is there any sign of life? (Rietveld’s Schroder-Schrader house in Utrecht is warm and welcoming by comparison.) In…
Jennifer Scanlon, 2014. …n Back to Eden. Explaining the decision, director RICHARD P Townsend, who joined the museum in October 2013, describes the role of commissioned works as, “the opening of an exciting new chapter for MOBIA as we expand our exploration of the influence of biblical narrative on artists living and working today”. Townsend and his staff worked with independent curator Jennifer Scanlan to create an eclectic, provocative display, which, no doubt, will leave visitors pondering their own visions of paradise as a key to their deepest desires. Studio International spoke with Scanlan about choosing and commissioning works for the show, the artists’ interpretations of the biblical story, common themes and symbolism, and the interplay of hope and despair characterising many of the works. Cindi Di Marzo: Thank you for speaking with Studio International about Back to Eden, Jennifer. The works in the show span the past 15 years, with a good balance between intimate paintings and large installati…
Canadian Centre for Architecture …ishizawa continues till October 26. RICHARD Carr …
Lucía Pizzani. Impronta Series, 2013. Wet collodion processed photography printed on cotton paper, 40 x 30 cm. …rrows its name from a novel by the English writer RICHARD le Gallienne, written around 1900. My previous body of work, The Unknown of the Seine, drew on the story of a forensic surgeon who was supposedly in love with a young woman who threw herself into the river and was like the Ophelia of the Seine. A funereal mask was made of her and this became an icon for many Surrealists, such as Man Ray. Le Gallienne wrote a novel about a family affected by the mask’s supernatural powers. At the end of the novel, the mask comes to life. A butterfly emerges from its mouth with a symbol of death, a calavera (skull), as seen in the film The Silence of the Lambs (1991). My starting point was this literary image of the butterfly of death. I started exploring the metamorphosis, the change of the chrysalis into the butterfly as a metaphor for a woman, where she is trapped inside her own body. First, I used ceramics. I started making these sculptures using biological illustrations of chrysalides, and …
Pat Sachs. A Folly, 2014. Collage, 73 x 70 mm (2⅞ x 2¾ in). …inen, Markku Komonen, Peter Zumthor, Renzo Piano, RICHARD Meier, Santiago Calatrava and César Pelli. JMcK: You have returned to drawing. Can you describe your methods and materials? What are you planning next? PS: I try to alternate between collage and drawing, otherwise I get burnt out on the collages. Working on them can get very frustrating. It’s hard to spend day in and day out sitting at a desk, head down, building them. Drawing is a good, mental shift from the intense focus it takes to do the collages. Drawing loosens me up both physically and creatively; the scale is much larger, too. I’ve always especially liked line, letting it loose on the page. In fact, after working on a collage – average size 4in x 3½in – facing a large sheet of paper is like taking a gallop through a vast field. I’m currently working on a series using trees as figurative elements. I've been studying trees. For this series, I’m rolling out the coloured pencils – mostly Derwents, but I ma…
40. FB55
FB55 installation view, Fox Reading Room, ICA, London, 2015. Photograph: Mark Blower. …on paintings and other ICA individuals, including RICHARD Hamilton, whose exhibition catalogue for the show that followed Bacon’s had the Jacques-Henri Lartigue photograph, The Grand Prix of the ACF, 26 June 1912, as its cover. Placed alongside a copy of Bacon’s Crucifixion (1965), it is fairly clear that the two figures in the photograph served as inspiration for those on the right-hand panel of the painting. So this is a show about a show of which scarcely any documentation exists – a mysterious black hole in the ICA archive – perhaps not the most obvious starting point for an exhibition. What is presented instead is the timeline, the findings along the way, the meanderings of Muir, and a portrait of the period, as it would have been for a gay man in London in the early 50s. It is revealing, contextualising and fascinating. It does not shed any new light on Bacon himself, but it certainly highlights the bravery of his paintings and their sometimes fairly direct content, depi…
41. Line
Athanasios Argianas. Song Machine 19 (the length of a strand of your hair of the width of your arms, unfolded), 2011. Photo-etched brass strip, mild steel, black patina, 200 x 400 x 200 cm. … geographical line in a very different direction, RICHARD Long’s text-based work A Four Day Walk (1980) documents a linear walk the land art pioneer made that year, distilling a straight stretch of land 94 miles long into a text, printed on the wall, which evokes its sights and sounds: “Road Stony Track Road Grass Field Road Bare Rock Lane Road Stony Path Heather Burnt Moor Stony Path Road.” Next to it, Athanasios Argianas’s Song Machine 19 also uses words to conjure lines, though in a more abstract sense: the artist inscribes thin ribbons of brass, elegantly draped over a steel armature, with descriptions of subjective measurements: “A single endlessly long strand … of the length of your arms, unfolded … the length of a shoelace … of the width of a coral snake curled up.” The line in Tom Marioni’s joyful photograph One Second Sculpture (1969) takes as its terrain not land, but air: this is another recorded performance, in which the artist threw up a coiled tape me…
Stanley Spencer. Neighbours, 1936. © the artist's estate / Bridgeman Images. Courtesy Stanley Spencer Gallery, Cookham. …a Carline, sister of his friend and fellow artist RICHARD Carline. Hilda was also an artist, and, for some time, they lived by Hampstead Heath, before moving to Burghclere in Hampshire in 1927, where he made his paintings for the Sandham Memorial Chapel, and then back to Cookham in 1932. Here, Spencer met Patricia Preece, a young and aspiring artist who became his model and muse, and, ultimately led to his divorce from Hilda. Four days after the divorce, he wed Patricia. From the outset, however, their marriage was a failure, never consummated, and Patricia continued to live with her friend (and lover) Dorothy Hepworth, even going on the honeymoon with her while leaving Spencer behind in Cookham. Hilda remained the love of Spencer’s life and he continued to write letters to her even after her death. This convoluted entanglement led Spencer to make a series of works called Beatitudes of Love, exploring the relationship between husbands and wives. The Beatitudes of Love: Contempla…
Irene Barberis. Foldout Futures, 2007. <em>All I have…(in Chicago). Grant Park, utopian ideals</em>, 2007. 300 x 280 cms. <em>Twin Towers</em>, 2007: celestial tower, word tower, celestial shadow word tower. 300 x 6cms x 2. Every article in traveling cases (clothes, makeup, boots, papers etc), tape, fluorescent pink pvc, clear and black silicone © the artist. Photo, the artist. Edinburgh College of Art Studio Gallery, John David Mooney Foundation, Chicago, Illinois, USA …gion. In Britain this has been made articulate by RICHARD Dawkins, the British scientist and chair for the public understanding of science at Oxford University and author of The God Delusion, which sold 180,000 copies in hardback. His is a militant atheism using abusive and crude stereotypes, just as the Conservative Party sacked a Shadow Minister for "clumsy race remarks", Dawkins is unrepentant.4 There has as one might expect, been a backlash. A further author, Christopher Hitchens, also takes a hostile approach to faith in our turgid times. His new book, God is Not Great: The Case Against Religion, is to be published by Atlantic Books in May. John Gray, Professor of European Thought at the London School of Economics publishes his book, Black Mass: Apocalyptic Religion and the Death of Utopia, later this year.5 These are heady times. On one hand, many seek solace in religion, others revile it for its negative and destructive associations and consequences.   In Australia, C…
Lubaina Himid. Jelly Mould Pavilions Project, Folkestone Triennial, 2017. Photograph: Martin Kennedy. … pressing than the UK’s current housing crisis. RICHARD Woods’s Holiday Home installation takes the form of six cute, cartoon-bright structures lurching and bobbing around the town and its harbour; always perilously balanced to remind us just how out of kilter the UK’s housing market is – the affluent few may own several homes, while the impoverished many struggle to stay afloat either in the rental or buying market. Elsewhere, we have a meditation on – or possible antidote to – the UK’s massively depleted art education system from the ever-genial Bob and Roberta Smith, who has turned the whole town into a space for artistic investigation and self-expression, via his Folkestone is an Art School initiative - announced in his usual bright, poster-paint signage on banners all over the town. [image11] With a faculty chosen from Folkestone’s own art practitioners, and 12 students selected from the local schools and sixth form college (with Smith himself as the 13th studen…
José Parlá in residence at Landmarks, the public art programme of The University of Texas at Austin, 2017. Photograph: Rey Parlá. …e Performing Gesture (2012), for the lobby of its RICHARD B Fisher Building. Parlá’s most high-profile commission to date, though, is for One World Trade Center. Visitors to the center, noted as the tallest building in the western hemisphere, encounter the electric blue and bright-pink fragments of ONE: Union of the Senses (2014) as soon as they enter. [image5] The artist’s most recent site-specific work is Amistad América, commissioned by Landmarks at the University of Texas at Austin. The university’s public art programme holds a prominent collection of works that are installed throughout the 433-acre (1.75 sq km) campus and includes commissions and acquisitions of works by Mark di Suvero, Ann Hamilton, Sol LeWitt, Nancy Rubins and James Turrell, as well as 28 sculptures on long-term loan from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, featuring works by Magdalena Abakanowicz, Louise Bourgeois, Tony Smith and Ursula von Rydingsvard among others. Amistad América, which is the first pa…
Odili Donald Odita. The Velocity of Change, 2015. Acrylic latex wall paint, dimensions variable. …tin, Bridget Riley, Alma Thomas, Stanley Whitney, RICHARD Tuttle, Radcliffe Bailey, Jacob Lawrence, Senga Nengudi, Ellsworth Kelly and Olivier Mosset. AWB: What are some of the more interesting exhibitions, artists and works that you have seen or been made aware of recently? What parts of our current visual and aesthetic culture do you find exciting? ODO: There are a lot of exhibitions I speak about with my students at the Tyler School of Art. Most notably, I am thinking a lot about the 2007-08 Unmonumental exhibition at the New Museum in New York. I am interested in how the work in this show still ties into a certain attitude coming out of student production today, and with respect to the cultural and economic conditions we now have in the 21st century. I think what the Studio Museum in Harlem has done in the past 10 years is as groundbreaking as what the New Museum under Marsha Tucker did in the late-1980s to the early-90s. And there are great, new, fresh minds working out there i…
Screen model of The Metal Workers' Union (IMG) Building, Berlin. Courtesy Graham Ellard and Stephen Johnstone. … German cultural organisation, ifa. RICHARD Carr …
Peter Doig. <em>Cabin Essence,</em> 1993–94. Oil on canvas, 230 x 360 cm. Private collection …e horizontal geometry of Le Corbusier's building. RICHARD Shiff's catalogue essay notes the continuity of this project with Cézanne's, exemplified in paintings like 'Farm in Normandy, Summer' (1882),1 whilst also seeing the obliterating snowflakes that abound in Doig's winter paintings as an extension of this interest in screening.2 The exhibition has been arranged so that these winter and snow scenes are hung together in the next room, and this proves to be their undoing: the most captivating, such as 'Ski Jacket' (1994), are undermined by paintings such as 'Cobourg 3 + 1 more' (1994) and 'Pond Life'(1993) which, for this viewer at least, remain in the realm of kitsch. Doig's paintings regularly run this risk, but are usually saved by their disturbing undertones. In 'Echo Lake'(1998) the disturbance is literal. Dark trees frame an acid green and rose foreshore, and reflect in a placid lake. A police car sits in the clearing, a temporary disturbance of the pastoral, but its ref…
Front of Pallant House Gallery.  Photographer Anne-Katrin Purkiss (2006). …olozzi, collages by Nigel Henderson, paintings by RICHARD Hamilton, Peter Blake, Colin Self, Joe Tilson, Patrick Caulfield, Howard Hodgkin and Ron Kitaj. But then this excellently curated exposition turns astutely to include (also from the Wilson gift) an array of post-war British figurative art, with works by Lucian Freud, John Minton, Bomberg, Frank Auerbach, Michael Andrews, William Coldstream, Victor Willing, linked to Pallant House's past by two works by John Davies and again Frank Auerbach, both from the Hussey bequest. New or recent commissions from the Pallant Gallery Trust now include a large wall drawing by Paul Huxley and contemporary works again from the Wilson gift, recent works by Anthony Caro, Joe Tilson, Patrick Caulfield and William Tucker. So the commissioning and acquisition process at Pallant House Gallery will continue apace. The whole Pallant House Gallery is a momentous achievement, given the repeated vagaries that have in the…
Antony Gormley. Cave, 1987. Charcoal, oil and pigment on paper, 38 x 29 cm. © the artist. Photograph: Antonia Reeve Photography, Edinburgh. … Antony Gormley, Roger Hiorns, Simon Starling and RICHARD Long, show works that provide original insight into the theme in a continual interrogation of the body and the void it inhabits. In a reverent nod to Moore’s sculptural legacy, these artists, whose work is translated and interpreted across mediums and concepts, have Moore as a muse. It is always Moore’s works to which the viewer returns, contemplating the cycle of life, living, nature and mortality through the physical and psychological shape of the body.…


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