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…from internationally acclaimed architects such as RICHARD Gluckman, Arata Isozaki, Carlos Jimenez, Ricardo Legorreta and David Schwarz, Ando’s proposal was selected in 1997 and construction began in 1999. Located in Fort Worth's Cultural District, the New Modern sits directly opposite the Kimbell Art Museum, designed by Louis Kahn (and regarded by many as one of the best works of architecture of the 20th century) and near to the Amon Carter Museum, designed by Philip Johnson. Seeking a sensitive relationship to the barrel-vaulted Kimbell, Ando’s design is comprised of five long, flat roof pavilions, aligned on a north-south axis, floating over a 1.5 acre reflective pool of water. It is Ando's largest commission in the United States to date. One of the most prominent features of the New Modern is the impressive 12 metre tall, concrete, Y-shaped columns, supporting the cantilevered concrete roofs of the galleries. The roofs shade the building exterior and allow diffused and reflec…
Jamian Juliano-Villani. The World's Greatest Planet on Earth, 2016, Installation view, Studio Voltaire, London. Courtesy of the artist and Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin. Photograph: Andy Keate. …artoonists such as Mort Drucker, Ralph Bakshi and RICHARD Corbin, whom she looks to for their confident and direct vocabulary. The smallest work in the exhibition is a black on white portrait, a sketchy caricature of a male face. She uses the language of a cartoonist, yet she also skews the lines, adding her own surreal effect to the work. The images she draws from – photographs, comic books, cartoons, pictures taken from the internet, films and video games – are images we usually glance at only cursorily, yet Juliano-Villani eternalises these passing impressions into paint. She does not elevate painting to the status afforded it by the art world, however: in her vision, these images remain cursory as she discards the next finished painting for a new one, adopting a flippant and distracted attitude to her own work. As a result, strange narratives emerge, telltale of a moment in her life and, consequently, her personal history seeps through the works. Stick Drawing for Hel…
Paul Sandby (1731-1809). <em>The Rainbow</em>, c 1800. Nottingham City Museums and Galleries. …ut, Paul Sandby stood with such contemporaries as RICHARD Wilson, Joseph Wright of Derby or indeed William Hogarth, yet he has never been deemed by critics worthy of the same critical attention as the others. All were active during a major transitional period in the economic and social history of the British Isles, as the Industrial Revolution gathered force. Even over the 200 years since Sandby’s death there has been little awareness of the role he played in the cultural life of England. While the context for landscape painting was already well defined by his contemporaries, well known landscape architects such as Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown seemed not to favour him, although for example Wilson painted a number of the country ‘seats’ which Brown had embellished. It seems that Sandby was graded as a professional draughtsman, a topographical artist of lower rank. Despite his preference for watercolours, indeed a degree of pre-eminen…
California Video: Artists and Histories … Studio International’s Editor at the time, RICHARD Cork, was quick to realise the full significance of video as a medium in art. He also recognised in particular, Stoerchle’s true worth and Miles Varner’s article was placed in pole position, in that issue, consolidating both his teaching and experimental role and its premiation of process, per se. Catherine Taft here raises the question of the mythology that emerged and grew rapidly around the dead artist (not unlike that which follows land artist Robert Smithson even today). Stoerchle’s horse ride from Toronto to Los Angeles (his point of arrival) merely embellished his creative reputation. Significant in the subsequent galaxy of talent from Long Beach was of course Bill Viola. As Pauline Stakelon aptly describes here, 'Viola came to understand that video was an electronic circuit independent of any external reality, a realisation that led him to refocus his attention on his viewer’s percept…
Harold Cohen’s Drawing Machine in 1979. Courtesy Harold Cohen’s archive. … featured the sculptor Anthony Caro, the painters RICHARD Smith and Robyn Denny, as well as another painter, Bernard Cohen, Harold’s younger brother. Although the main award did not go to the UK, the career of all five took off following the exhibition and they continued to gain international prestige, conquering museums and galleries. Cohen, however, preferred to follow a more intricate path, radically changing his stance on art. Coincidentally, another of the interviewees featured in the same June 1966 issue of Studio International, Marcel Duchamp – in one of his last conversations published during his lifetime4 – had done a similar thing, abandoning painting in 1918 to follow a more cerebral artistic practice. Cohen, at the height of his career, with works in collections such as the Tate Gallery, likewise left everything behind. Interviewed for the magazine by art critic Dore Ashton, Duchamp, when asked if he had anything to say about the extensive connection between art and…
Susan Hiller. Channels, 2013. Installation photograph by Peter White, courtesy the artist, Timothy Taylor Gallery and Matt's Gallery, London. …n-4.php 2. Ibid. 3. Susan Hiller interviewed by RICHARD Grayson for Talking Art at Tate Modern, London, June 14, 2008. 4. “Arthur Watson: Poetic Conceptualist”, Studio International, 2008: www.studiointernational.com 5. Mark Godfrey, The Last Silent Movie, Matt’s Gallery, 12-27 July, 2008, p.6. 6. Hiller: Talking Art, op.cit. 7. Antony Gormley interviewed by Janet McKenzie, Studio Visit 2, Studio International, 4 November 2011. www.studiointernational.com 8. Talking Art, op.cit. 9. Ibid.  …
32. Australia
Sidney Nolan. Ned Kelly, 1946. Enamel on composition board, 90.8 x 121.5 cm. National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. …ollowing in the respective footsteps and brush of RICHARD Long and Paul Klee, the latter of whom Gladwell likes to quote: “Drawing is like taking a line for a walk.” The paradoxical stillness of the moving image creates an extended present moment recalling, “the Aboriginal idea of past, present and future as one”. His evocations of “marking, possessing and confronting unfamiliar territory”12 can be seen to represent the multifarious paths, both physical and spiritual that characterise both Aboriginal and colonial responses to the land. Exploration, the navigation through alien lands by colonists and thereafter waves of migrants is a characteristic of Australian art and the new culture established through the ongoing quest for a personal and national identity. As an appropriate departure from previous surveys of Australian art, the exhibition opens with a superb room of large recent Aboriginal paintings. The land is pivotal to indigenous culture as the Aboriginal curators W…
The Gallery. Photo: Scott Frances. Courtesy: Glenstone Museum. …s Ray’s mock-harvest Untitled (Tractor) (2008), RICHARD Serra’s autumn-red conical Corten-steel Sylvester (2001) and, reaching out to them all, the long shadow of Ellsworth Kelly’s wintry (Untitled) totem.  Gwathmey’s Glenstone “phase one” itself presented as a sculpture, a modernist grey geometry of sleek, angled limestone softened by interventions of long picture windows (one stretching to 37ft) that view on acres of designated grassland. [image6] Detailed with field-marshal precision in the notebook tucked under her arm were Emily Rales’s plans for “phase two”. A call away from her mobile phone was the team of outside and inhouse experts and associates, curators and technicians, landscapers and installers, without whom this immense collaboration would not materialise. Like a latterday Prospero, Emily Wei Rales waved a wand over her incipient paradise. To the north, earth was being excavated and materials hauled in for The Pavilions – 11 interlocked galleri…
Donatello scholar Daniel Zolli. …n to date. Nevertheless, the museum’s director, RICHARD P Townsend, considers the move an opportunity to expand its reach. He says: “I think it’s imperative that in New York – a global capital of culture – there is an institution that provides the additional filter of the Bible’s pivotal role in the western visual tradition, and more largely its culture. With Sculpture in the Age of Donatello, we’ve taken our programme to an entirely new level; the exhibit shows what we can do, and how our unique mission opens opportunities that wouldn’t otherwise exist.” The accompanying catalogue for Sculpture in the Age of Donatello3 contains essays that point to stylistic advances that these artists, all in their 20s when they began work on the cathedral, achieved, sparking what we call the Italian Renaissance. For one event in MOBIA's extensive schedule of related programming,4 the museum partners with the Rubin Museum of Art, which features art from the Himalayas, India and ne…
Martha Friedman, Pore featuring collaborative performance with Silas Riener, 2015. Installation view at Locust Projects, Miami. Photograph: Christian Hernandez. …ner were among the standouts, with Jenny Saville, RICHARD Prince and John Currin among the 11 artists upholding the Gagosian brand. Wednesday, as reported, the main event opened quietly – the early-entry VIP invitations having been cut down to time-tested collectors – but the press was too hasty to attribute the first hours’ hush to poor sales. If, in contrast to the satellite fairs where works priced between $20,000 (£13,286) and $40,000 were flying off walls, main fair buyers were taking their time, making notes, and smart-phone researching comparable gallery and auction sales, it was but to validate such hefty purchases as a 1954, $15m Francis Bacon, a 1971, $10.5m Picasso, two multimillion-dollar Warhol Mao paintings and a $2m Jasper Johns Savarin coffee can monotype! There were no gee-whiz installations, but Jimmie Durham’s classic sculpture of a car crushed by a monolith, and a flashy assemblage anchored by a dead tree that Ai Weiwei had rendered in bronze provided irre…
Hanne Darboven. In-House Letter to Mother at Burgberg, 24.12.1974. Copyright: Hanne Darboven Foundation. Courtesy Christians Verlag, Hamburg. …ough it is always a pleasure to see early work by RICHARD Long and Gilbert & George, they lack the clear connection of the New Yorkers to Darboven’s work. Bernd and Hilla Becher’s Gute Hoffnungs Hütte Oberhausen (1969-72) series is composed of 41 photographs of the same industrial building, which might come as a surprise to those familiar with their more commonly seen inventories of discrete structures. On its own terms, it is a marvel. To place it alongside Darboven as another use of archive is a narrow interpretation of all three practitioners. The Bechers’ revisiting of the same spatial site from different angles seems rather different from Darboven’s multi-panel opuses, such as Milieu >80<, Posthum (1987), in which there is a sense of progression with each iteration. You could scramble the order of the Bechers’ works, but Darboven’s are sequential. On the exhibition’s evidence, it is Kawara who emerges as Darboven’s kindred spirit. One of Darboven’s mo…
Kurt Schwitters. En Morn, 1947. © Centre Georges Pompidou, Musée national d’art moderne, Paris/DACS 2012. … of Schwitters most felt?  Certainly by both RICHARD Hamilton and Eduardo Paolozzi, and indeed influencing in attitude Nigel Henderson, and so permeating through British Pop Art. Paolozzi was emphatic about this5 with a later and revealing observation. He had while still at the Slade been enabled by E. T. Mesens of the London Gallery to study the collages still there in 1946. Paolozzi commented: “Schwitters made his collages (most likely) according to the laws of chance-very much part of recent art history. Although one must retain the image of raw material-rejected rubbish such as used bus tokens-the dynamic part is the commitment of finally sticking down the objects. The excitement truly comes when the artist at that moment actually goes beyond his own preconceptions and aspirations.” Of the later works, as postmodernism encroached upon curated reservations in the 1980s, it was evident that John Elderfield sensed a weakness there: yet Nicholas Wadley6 in his appraisal recog…
Damien Hirst. The Collector with Friend. Bronze, 185.5 x 123.5 x 73 cm. Photograph: Joe Lloyd. … The YBA’s watery comeback dazzles with its extravagance, but the audacity of Hirst’s exhibition only goes so far Punta della Dogana and Palazzo Grassi, Venice 9 April – 3 December 2017 by JOE LLOYD In the atrium of Venice’s Palazzo Grassi stands an 18-metre tall statue of a headless titan, so prodigious that its installation required the temporary removal of the palace’s roof – this is Demon with Bowl, the colossal centrepiece of Damien Hirst’s Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable. Made from resin coated to appear bronze and encrusted with aquatic debris, the sculpture’s sheer monumentality is exhilarating. Its dread head lies adjacent, and identifies it as a comical over-enlargement of William Blake’s The Ghost of a Flea (c1819-20). After dipping one’s toe into some of the more tepid exhibits in the Venice Biennale’s official exhibition, Viva Arte Viva, Treasures’ audacity comes as a bracing plunge pool. [image4] Treasures abounds with reference…
Jedd Novatt with Chaos SAS, 2013. Stainless steel, 440 x 420 x 265 cm. Permanent installation at Pérez Art Museum, Miami. …you think about Mark Rothko or go down the list - RICHARD Serra, Carl Andre or Frank Gehry, Eduardo Chillida - all these people whose work I do admire - I think you keep pushing ideas as hard as you can. And, by the way, it’s not about the idea of finishing something, or completing something. If I come back in 100 years, I could tell you – ah, yeah, this work did solve something. But I’ve no idea now. No artist does. That’s the absurdity of the idea that the artist is going to have some clue about their own work, and I know that I don’t. I just keep on making work. And so on with the next one, and the next one. In the end, this body of work will exist and in the future they’re going to have some way of deciding what it means, or how it fits or doesn’t fit, but it’s ultimately just a giant puzzle to me. At the end of the day, all the works I’ve created are part of that puzzle. [image12] VS: You said in an interview once that the placement of your work in cities or la…
An interview with Marcel Duchamp by Dore Ashton. First published in Studio International, Vol 171, No 878, June 1966, page 244. …main enemies.’ What, I asked, does he think of RICHARD Hamilton’s professorial analysis of the Bottle Dryer; his discussion of the ‘symmetry’, etc.? ‘Symmetry was only a point in my life. Since asymmetry dominated from 1870, I re-introduced symmetry in order to use something not accepted at the time. If you think of the kind of distorting for distorting’s sake indulged in by Matisse.... He did it for pleasure, for the fun of it. He was right to do it, but I have to laugh at the great theories around it. Yes, he was retinal all right. But the retina is only a door that you open to go further.’ I asked Duchamp whether he had anything to say about the extensive linking of art with technology, and the attempts to make him a progenitor of the tendency. ‘They have to get somebody as a progenitor so as not to look as though they invent it all by themselves. Makes a better package. But technology: art will be sunk or drowned by technology. Look, I’ll show you an example.…
John Constable. Sketch for ‘Hadleigh Castle’ c1828–9. Tate. …, 2014, page 130. 13. Quoted in Visual Culture by RICHARD Howells and Joaquim Negreiros, Polity, 2012, page 93. 14. D Cohen, Seeing Moore: The case of two critics, Herbert Read and Peter Fuller, AICARC, Zurich, 1991, available online http:www.artcritical.com/seeing%20moore.htm 15. Quoted in Television by J Wyver. In: Kenneth Clark: Looking for Civilisation, edited by C Stephens and J-P Stonard, Tate Publishing, 2014, page 129. 16. In Search of Cultural History by Ernst Gombrich, cited in Art History and its Methods by E Fernie, Phaidon, 2005. 17. Civilization, anessay by Clive Bell, Penguin, 1947, page 104. 18. Quoted in Kenneth Clark: Looking for Civilisation, edited by C Stephens and J-P Stonard, Tate Publishing, 2014, page 133. 19. Is Art History Globalizable? by Shigemi Inaga.In: Is Art History Global?, edited by J Elkins, Routledge, 2007. 20. Quoted in Kenneth Clark: Looking for Civilisation, edited by C Stephens and J-P Stonard, Tate Publishing, 2014, page 16. 21. Piero: A Maste…
Servo Fumo floor ashtray produced by Zanotta 1961 …d design in Italy since the Second World War. by RICHARD Carr The two remaining members are Magistretti and Sottsass, the former renowned mostly for his furniture and light fittings, the latter for breaking all the established rules of design. This he did when he mixed precious and non-precious materials, and bright colours along with patterns that recalled the American diners of the 1950s, for the furniture and light fittings created for Alchimia and Memphis at the beginning of the 1980s. Unlike Sottsass, however, Castiglioni was not a radical in the sense of setting out to destroy the conventions of design that run in a linear progression from the Arts and Crafts Movement at the end of the 19th century to the Bauhaus of the 1920s and Scandinavian design of the 1950s. Where he was a radical was in his ability to select ordinary objects and transform them, just as Duchamp did when he presented a urinal which he called ‘Fountain’ for an exhibition in New York in 1917, and just as…
Chris Burden. Dos Equis, 1972. Laguna Beach, California: October 16, 1972. Photograph: Barbara Burden. …by gravity, loses the tension (that perilous edge RICHARD Serra would later take to the stratosphere) of something looming precariously that could topple any minute. Still, the museum comes off well with the preponderance of Burden’s work and does well by him too. There is enough space to stroll around the signature bridge he fashioned of interlocked metal. Remember Erector Sets, which soared hard-edged metal structures up and out long before their dangerous possibilities were gentled by Lego? Burden’s iterations seemed fresh at the time and they have aged gracefully. At the opening, the generally discerning art critic Jason Epstein thought them disappointing, the sort of thing we used to make as kids, albeit scaled up. Well, yes, we may have built bridges, but we did not scale them up. He may not have experienced the impact these erections had on the rough desert landscape (I’m thinking of Burden’s 40ft Step Skyscraper) as opposed to on his nursery floor or on the museum’s …
…ayeff's pavilion is just as good. RICHARD Carr …
Shigeo Anzai, Daniel Buren, The 10th Tokyo Biennale '70 - Between Man and Matter, Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum. May, 1970. Baryta-coated silver print. Courtesy the artist and White Rainbow, London. …rapher to assist participating artists, including RICHARD Serra, Carl Andre and Daniel Buren. Ball sees this period as a fertile time for Japanese art, representing the height of the Mono-ha movement that had begun in the 1960s and explored the relationship between man-made and natural materials. Art was becoming increasingly process-based and performative as a means to investigate these properties, which was one reason why Anzaï’s photographs have become such important documents today, illustrating the spirit of an experimental and ephemeral movement. Many of the 54 photographs in this exhibition were taken by Anzaï at the biennale. One photograph shows Serra drawing a circle on the ground using a piece of string, inside which he intended to plant a tree. As it turned out, for some unknown reason, this work was not completed. However, thanks to Anzaï’s photograph, it lives on. In another instance, a work by Christo was banned from the biennale by the commissioner, but Christo…
Cliff Rowe, Woman Cleaning a Locomotive in St Pancras Cleaning Yard, 1942. Watercolour with white on board, 23 x 32 cm. National Railway Museum, York. © Anna Sandra Thornberry, daughter. …tury, which is that art and politics don’t mix. RICHARD Long was saying exactly the same thing on Radio 4 this morning. The other thing is that artists tend to be loners, so it is quite hard to get them organised into any union. In a way, what power would they have? How can they go on strike? No one is going to notice if they stopped working. So it’s a difficult field to organise. What’s amazing is that the AIA managed it for so many years. AMc: What about the Arts Council, which was founded in 1946? How did that fit into the story? CL: The artists initially welcomed the foundation of the Arts Council as it fulfilled socially committed artists’ long-expressed calls for state patronage of living art. But their hopes were dashed when it moved from its inclusive “Best for the Most” policies to its elitist “Few, but Roses”policies, which – despite some exceptions – favoured modernist high art. AMc: What are your feelings towards the work of the Arts Council today? C…
Eileen Gray …the result was very unsatisfactory. RICHARD Carr …
Nicholas Blowers. <em>Boulders descending through trees,</em> 2007. Oil on paper, 104 x 92 cm …camera flash'. And he quotes the Tasmanian writer RICHARD Flanagan: 'The particular agony of Tasmania is in the end neither environmental nor political, but spiritual, and it is in the end merely one end, a highly visible end of a continuum that extends from the muddy ash of the Styx valley to the blood spattered walls of Baghdad and the torture cells of Guantanamo Bay'. This artist is now seeking new sanctuaries out in the Tasmanian forest, uncovering and depicting 'collapse and decay… An impenetrable dark wall of trees may offer a glimpse of light some distance inward - often a huge gum has fallen, clearing a pathway. A fallen gum will have left a splintered trunk surrounded by splinters of shattered bark. I was recently standing on the trunk of a huge fallen tree and looking back at the trunk, it appeared a totally implausible form, unique and singular like a castle turret whose walls have splintered and fallen outwards'. Blowers says he continues …
Andy Warhol. Vote McGovern, 1972. Founding Collection, The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh © 2008 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts / ARS, New York. …fying picture stands out: Vote McGovern, in which RICHARD Nixon grimaces in horrific blue and nauseous green, with the yellowed eyes of a monster. This was Warhol’s contribution to the Democratic campaign, or at least a joke at Nixon’s expense. What is interesting about the selection here is that these figures conjure up their modern equivalents and the little-changed narratives and caricatures that dominate our TV screens today. Everything and nothing has changed, from one political era to another. Even the art that comments and enjoys the surrealism of politics has not moved on very much from the garish prints that Warhol created, in part due to the artist’s own power and populism. And that is what is perhaps the most fascinating aspect of this show – that the art trivialises the politics it paints. It reduces the grand theatre of the political stage to a crazy circus of impossible illusions. There is a detectable buzz and frisson about the show, from the crowds of Scots an…
Joe Winkleman, 2014. Photograph: Nick Howard. …ve produced and illustrated The SewaneePoems with RICHARD Tillinghast (winkelman.co.uk). Taking passages from his verses, I drew visual compositions on transfer paper to make a set of lithographic prints at the Curwen Studio in Cambridge. JMcK: If all art is, among other things, an exploration of self, and if art navigates an inner space, then your trees and rocks and mountains seem to me to celebrate the necessity of contemplation and the inexplicable aspects of life. Can you make reference to the Caves at Staffa etching? JW: I must confess to being romantic, in that my imagery is an expression of my emotional response to nature. I am consumed in observing the natural world and make my etchings with devotion to the subject using my utmost concentration, with what Auden called “intensity of attention”. I like to think that I am stating wonder as well as truths about what I take for my themes. I celebrate life through contemplation of extraordinary natural phenomena that are visua…


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