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From Mori Art Museum Inaugural Exhibition, <i>Happiness</i>. …architecture, Mori called upon American architect RICHARD Gluckman, well known for the Whitney Museum in New York and Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. Mori has also gathered high profile figures from the global museum world including Glenn Lowry from the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Alfred Pacquement from Georges Pompidou Centre in Paris, and Nicholas Serota from the Tate in London to form an international advisory board, thus ensuring that he gets a museum with a truly international viewpoint. Elliott says, 'Tokyo seems to be isolated from the rest of the world and now it is about time to communicate and get involved with the rest of the world'. He recognises great energy in Japanese audiences but points out that the contemporary art community is still very marginal: 'We are very concerned in the relationship between art and our life. Art is only intelligible in its relationship to our life. Without that, art has no meaning. So our policy is to focus on the contemporary, prima…
Sol LeWitt. Drawing Series l968 (Fours) …e rightly traced the term back some four years to RICHARD Wollheim in Arts Magazine, January l965. This last was to create confusion, even discrediting the genre. Reise had, in fact, been asked by Studio International to review the exhibition, 'Minimal Art' mounted at the Gemeentemuseum, The Hague in 1969 by Curator Enno Develing. Reise set out to correct the basic misconceptions, which had proliferated by then over the term. Develing, for his part, made a spirited attempt with the work of ten invited artists, each of whom submitted five works for the show. Sol LeWitt was one of these ten. Reise found his work seemed less material even than Flavin's: Not because his materials are less solid than light, but because his conceptual content dominates its sensuous expression in matter. Lewitt actively de-emphasises the three dimensional tactile properties of his materials.1 Reise pointed out: From early in his career he has neutralised…
Cildo Meireles. The clocks in the background are part of Fontes (1992/2008) installation. …artists (among them British artists Keith Arnatt, RICHARD Long and Gilbert & George). 2. 'Southern Cross' (1969-70) is a small cube measuring less than 1 centimetre. Made of oak and pinewood, sacred trees to the indigenous tribes, the piece was displayed at Tate Modern on the floor of an empty gallery room. The work deals with the problematic simplification which the indigenous people suffered at the hands of the colonizers. The first part of 'Insertions into Ideological Circuits: Project Coca-Cola and Banknote'(1970-76) consisted of sticking political messages (e.g., 'Yankees go home') as transfers on Coca-Cola bottles and returning them to the Coca-Cola warehouse. The messages would only be apparent when filled with liquid again. The same system was applied to the banknotes, but in this case, the notes went into circulation immediately as nobody would keep the money or destroy it. 3. 'Babel' (2001) is a 5 metre-high tower of nearly 700 radios, each one synchronized to a different…
National Museum of the American Indian (Exterior) … zealously, the Founding Director of NMAI, W. RICHARD West, Jr., appointed in 1990, who is a Southern Cheyenne and member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma. The five story, 250,000 sq. ft., $219 million NMAI was originally designed by renowned Native American architect Douglas Cardinal, whose work includes the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Hull. Cardinal was selected as chief design architect in 1993, but was fired in 1998. The dispute between Cardinal and the Smithsonian was settled out of court in 1999, but Cardinal was out. A superb Cardinal designed structure could not be finished on time without him, and the museum was scheduled to open in 2002 but took two more years to finally become a reality. One person missing at the opening ceremonies, and from all the literature abou…
Joseph Beuys (German, 1921-86). <em>Filzanzug (Felt Suit)</em>, 1970. Multiple of felt, composition: 69 7/8 x 28 1/8 x 5 5/16 in (177.5 x 71.5 x 13.5 cm). Publisher: Galerie René Block, Berlin. Fabricator: unknown. Edition: 100. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Associates Fund, 1993. © 2006 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn. …'Bathroom Mirror' and 'Cafe Sign', both 1968, and RICHARD Hamilton's (b.1922) collage-like 'Interior' (1964); Swiss artist Dieter Roth's (1930-98) surreal 'Hut (Hat)' (1968); and German artist Blinky Palermo's (1943-77) child-like '4 Prototypen' ('4 Prototypes') from 1970. In 'Language', journals, art books, screen prints, lithographs, record jackets, linoleum cuts, postcards and other works incorporating letters, numbers, symbols and poetry are displayed. Conceptual artists naturally gravitated towards these modes of expression. Art books amplified the space within which an artist could pursue a theme, allowing it to unfold in space over time. For example, Belgian artist Marcel Broodthaers (1924-76) was a poet and bookseller before he began making art in 1964. His books give a visual life to poetic texts; his own (Pense-Bête, 1964) and one by Stéphane Mallarmé (Un Coup de Dés Jamais n'Abolira le Hasard, 1969), for example. Wye and Weitman point…
Kettle's Yard, Cambridge. New entrance. Fobert Architects © Hufton+Crow. …e a 10kN load, says Fobert, “so it could take a RICHARD Serra now”. These floors have a crude, honest materiality in tune with Martin’s favourite brick, while Fobert’s trademark material – mild steel – appears in a dramatic, zigzagging staircase that sculpts out the circulation space between the new wing’s upper floors; its edges and joins are left tactile and raw. [image6] There are interesting angles, in tune with the nooks and crannies of the old Kettle’s Yard. A comfy window seat extends from the steel stair frame at the stair’s top, with a large window looking into the adjacent churchyard, where Nathan Coley’s new artwork broadcasts: The Same for Everyone. Another new view has been opened on the opposite side of the stair, linking this complex to the spires of nearby churches and college chapels. [image19] There is a sympathetic use of wood (lovely hand-turned handrails throughout), and tasteful shop fittings that echo the simple domestic shelving and dinin…
… as always there were negative voices), in Sydney RICHARD Grayson's (The World May Be Fantastic) was equally successful. Born in England, Grayson had run the Experimental Art Foundation in Adelaide for many years, and became the first practising artist to curate a Sydney Biennale, with assistance in the formative stages from an advisory panel consisting of Ralph Rugoff based in California, American-born, London-based Susan Hiller and Janos Sugar from Budapest. The exhibition's title helps convey its premise: Fictions Fakes Fabrications Models Miniatures Hypotheses Conspiracy theories. It did not propose that people look seriously at what was happening politically in this country, nor did it present the audience with the views of those who had been ill-treated here. But this was never its intention, and it was conceived well before the 'fictitious' refugee children overboard saga that helped return the Howard government to power, as well as September 11. What, however, the two quite dif…
…British and American artists such as Keith Milow, RICHARD Smith and Barry Flanagan. Between 1971 and 1974 Gormley travelled through Turkey, Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India and finally Sri Lanka. In India, and under the studies of Buddhism and Vipassana meditation, Gormley would experience a different outlook on life. It was here that Gormley met a Burmese teacher called Goenka, who would become his guru. Goenka was a successful business- man who taught Gormley practiced techniques of meditation not as a religion but as a form of healing and a method of self-transformation, which focused on the connection between the mind and the body. Joseph Beuys was the 'most important artist to have been alive in my own time.'3 On his return in 1974, Gormley enrolled at the Central School of Art for a three- year degree course but Gormley left after a year and went to Goldsmith's School of Art in 1975. He went onto complete a further two years at the Slade School of Fine Art in 1977. Thi…
Robert Louis Stevenson by John Singer Sargent, 1887. Copyright: Courtesy of the Taft Museum of Art, Cincinnati, Ohio. …ist. Part of the aim of this exhibition, curator RICHARD Ormond tells us, is to demonstrate this otherwise neglected side of Sargent, but the picture that started it all is a modestly sized and initially unassuming painting. Robert Louis Stevenson and His Wife (1885) depicts the writer’s wiry figure as he paces the floor, nervously stroking his moustache. His large, wide-set eyes glance towards us as if he has only just noticed that there is someone in the room. The composition is an unusual one. Between Stevenson and his wife, Fanny, is an open door leading into a dark hallway, as if a third presence has entered the room. If this powerful painting was to be exhibited, it needed a context and the context was Sargent’s friends. Dr Pozzi at Home (1881) could hardly sit in sharper contrast to the portrait of Stevenson. Samuel-Jean Pozzi, we are told, was the father of modern French gynaecology, and, by all accounts, a bit of a libertine. He did much to advance medicine for women and…
Art Basel Miami Beach 2018, Al Held, B/W XIV, 1968 (left), Lynda Benglis, NAR, 1980 (centre), Sean Scully, Stack Greys, 2018 (right). Installation view, Art Basel Miami Beach 2018. Photo: Jill Spalding. …n Wearing C-type prints the Guggenheim Museum’s RICHARD Armstrong was considering. Also, new-to-the-pantheon luminaries such as Mark Bradford, Mark Grotjahn and – spotlit by her portrait of Michele Obama – Amy Sherald, whose auction prices have soared. And artists coming off of, or anticipating, a museum survey or solo mega-gallery exhibition. Scooped up by Pace and Hauser & Wirth, and showing until March at Miami’s new ICA museum, Larry Bell led the California light and space art revival that also brought (and sold) work by Peter Alexander and John McLaughlin; ahead of his Met Breuer retrospective, the ripped canvases of Argentina’s Lucio Fontana dotted four fairs; two small sculptures by Pedro Reyes, the featured artist at Design Miami, sold quickly, as did work by Dorothea Rockburne, recently profiled at Dia Beacon, and Nari Ward, extensively exhibited at the Pérez Art Museum Miami. Strong interest, too, in work by Adrian Piper, coming off his retrospective at MoMA;…
Luke Gottelier. Swarmy, 2001. Oil on canvas, 127 x 102 cm. …aricaturists James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson and RICHARD Newton. Gottelier’s paintings are like abstract in-jokes. A 2011 series of paintings involved the artist weaving secondhand ties through his canvases. He left them to hang off the bottom of the work, like a tie slung over the back of a chair after a long day in the office. Woman with Tits (2002) features a layered, abstract background, the topmost colour being a dark green that reveals, between drips, shades of yellow, orange and green. A worming line of lime works its way around the canvas, which is ambiguously either figurative or abstract. Details are added in another layer with a scrub of bluish paint. This work is hung above Lamb’s Scrap Poly Bench 1 (2014), a long bench that fades from white to aqua to apple to lemon to rose. Leaning on another pastel fade bench, Scrap Poly Bench 3 (pastel rainbow) (2014), is Joie de Vivre (2001) in which a curling telephone wire of paint trails its way from top to bottom. Two bloodsh…
…er of Quanterness, and our response to works like RICHARD Long's Chalk Line of 1984, which bears an uncanny formal resemblance to the outer sandstone surface of the Orkney cairn. Much of this is a direct - and moving - reflection of the author's own experiences as an archaeologist, and of a lifetime spent in the company of contemporary art and artists. Yet it is neither a series of personal responses nor an exercise in Gombrichian mix-and-match, but an entirely new account of why 20th and 21st century artists have been driven to answer the questions asked by Gauguin's famous symbolist canvas of over a century ago 'Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going?' Renfrew finds the answers to these questions in homo sapiens's engagement with the world of 'material-symbolic culture' in early agrarian societies, in the stone monuments of structures like Stonehenge and Orkney, where artefacts symbolised the relationship between idea and object, before the emergence of writing in th…
Anish Kapoor. <em>Leviathan</em>, 2011. View from inside the artwork. Photo Plowy Didier - All Rights Reserved Monumenta 2011, the Ministry of Culture and Communication. …The following year was the chance of the American RICHARD Serra who, with his minimalist approach, placed large-scale sheets of metal in the exhibition. In 2010, it was the French artist Christian Boltanski who forged an installation that combined sounds and memories represented by mountains of clothes. This year the challenge was given to this Indian-born British artist who conceived the apocalyptical monster Leviathan in the heart of Paris. Poetically playing with a pre-modern design and ancient myths, Kapoor has once again proved that his artistic endeavour is key to understanding the path that sculpture in taking in the 21st century.…
…at kind of media, Flash, was a live video quoting RICHARD Serra’s early video called Boomerang. She has also done a few shows, in and outside school. She has a major in art. She’s a writer, too. But for now she really enjoys driving her Volkswagen. ABD: Would you say words and concepts are toys for you? Is there humour in your work? ßGH: Yes, there is some humour, but I wouldn’t say it is a primary feature. There are some artists who deal a lot with humour. It is one of their roots [or] the branches of their work. I might only come upon it once in a while and maybe bring it out here and there. It’s funny because some things could be terribly humorous. On the other hand, these same things can be simply a demonstration. For example, there is this work I call 'Full Circle', in which I am bending a steel rod that was actually the raw material I used in sculpture. I am bending it at the same time that my voice, combined with electronic sign wave, is making an image of a circle.…
William 
            E. Mossie. Playa Urbana/Urban Beach, 2002. … Channel works from the Collections of Pamela and RICHARD Kramlich and New Art Trust' runs through January 2003. British artist Steve McQueen's cool, soundless projected film entitled 'Just Above My Head' is exemplary, as is the environmentally more raucous 'Phat Free ' (1988) by David Hammons and the transformation of Linda Carter into Wonder Woman in 'Technology /Transfer' (l978-79) by Dara Birnbaum. Also currently running is 'Building Structures'. An architectural presentation by international artists whose names are becoming better known - such figures as Francis Cape, Nathan Carter, Wade Guyton, Rachel Harrison, Chris Hanson, Hendrika Sonnenberg, Ian Kiaer, Ross Knight, Rita McBride, Patrick Meagher, Manfred Pernice, John Powers, Karlis Rekevics, Lara Schnitger and Shirley Tse. It will be interesting to see, in two decades if not one, how many of these aspirants can be re-rated by the museum then, and how many fall by the wayside. This tension of survival is ever present in the …
Portrait of Harold Koda. Photograph: Tatijana Shoan. …e from Harvard. At FIT and the Met, he worked for RICHARD Martin, author of an introduction to James’s work published by Assouline. …
Thinking Machines Corporation, Waltham, Massachusetts. Danny Hillis, Tamiko Thiel, Gordon Bruce, Allen Hawthorne, and Ted Bilodeau. CM-2 Supercomputer. 1987. Steel, plexiglass, and electronics. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Midori Kono Thiel, Mary Austin in honor of Tamiko Thiel, The Aaron and Betty Lee Stern Foundation, and anonymous. Photograph: Stephen F. Grohe. … machine art is Diab DS-101 Computer, designed by RICHARD Hamilton for Ohio Scientific in 1985-1989. Hamilton, who is widely known for being a member of the London-based Independent Group in the 1950s and author of the famous pop art collage from 1956 Just What Is It that Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing?, which criticised postwar consumerism, displays his interest in computer technology as a possible counterforce to mass culture. Ernő Rubik’s ubiquitous Rubik’s Cube (1974) is another reminder of a cultural link between pop culture and computer age. Other projects in this section include designs developed by architect Cedric Price in 1978-1980 for the Generator Project, a complex of buildings for visiting artists in White Oak Plantation, Florida, commissioned by Gilman Paper Corporation. Price’s technical drawings, prints and models are all that is left of his unrealised project, which was conceived as a constantly mutating architecture, transformable through a …
Envelope 
      containing transparencies of Yves Saint Laurent's second haute couture collection 
      as chief designer at Christian Dior, 1958 …0. ISBN 0-316-86023-9 RICHARD Carr…
Matsumoto Hafu (b. 1952) <em>Outsize flower basket</em>, 2008. Bamboo, approximately 20 x 31 in. Collection of Saito Masamitsu. Photo: Tsuyoshi Inui. …ew creativity. In his recent book, The Craftsman, RICHARD Sennett writes of the 10,000 hours or so of practice needed to get a solid grounding in any craft.6 Sennett is writing mainly in Western terms, of course, and I wonder how those approximately five years of grunt work would look to a Japanese master or disciple. Not enough, I suspect! As you have said yourself, bamboo artists - and this is equally true of lacquerers, potters, etc - aren't generally regarded as mature until middle age. Maybe that's more like 60,000 hours in! There is this enduring belief among practitioners of traditional crafts that full maturity is virtually a lifelong task. Again, in terms of practice, another link between all of the artists is the huge importance attached to preparation of materials, so much so that in the case of bamboo, getting the strips ready for weaving (or whatever other technique is to be employed) is said to take 80 per cent of the time needed. Especially in the case of bamboo, because…
Margaret Bourke-White. Self-portrait with camera. Silver print, 34.9 x 22.7 cm. Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Los Angeles. © Digital Image Museum Associates/LACMA/Art Resource NY/Scala, Florence. …s on photography by Roland Barthes, translated by RICHARD Howard, published by Vintage, London, 2000, page 5.  …
Nicholas Rena and Matthew Smith. Proving Ground. Photograph: Phil Sayer. …the American minimalists, notably Donald Judd and RICHARD Serra – both artists who employ a blunt visual language. From his example I learnt that clay could be made to appear like steel, that it had this capacity to be both curvilinear and ‘stretching’ in effect yet also have the precision and determination of steel. Martin Smith is a generation younger than Gordon Baldwin; his pieces are very much more of this present world, in the sense that the industrially designed world surrounding us is also hard-edged and precise. Acknowledging the nature and visual language of the world as it is now made is important to me – to that extent Gordon Baldwin’s work now seems like a dream I loved but can no longer share.8 Rena is currently working on a major allegorical piece: The Supper at Emmaus (after Caravaggio) a homage to the painting by Carravaggio (1571–1610) of the same title (1601). On the one hand, a group of figures around a plate of bread; on the other, two jugs aroun…
Sam Stewart: Cryptic. Installation view, courtesy of the artist and Fort Gansevoort, New York. Photograph: Lauren Coleman. …ng that history to create these sculptural works. RICHARD Artschwager was one of the first people I discovered, which was amazing. Lucas Samaras, who was known mostly for his boxes, was another important person. Ettore Sottsass, the Memphis Group designer, and Jean Prouvé were also important. All of my knowledge about these artists was through the gallery. Then, as I went along, I realised that the artists who were making furniture were not necessarily furniture-makers. It wasn’t just about functional or formal developments. I started thinking about conceptual artists such as Lucy McKenzie and Mary Heilmann. I also remember seeing the Marcel Broodthaers show at the Museum of Modern Art, which was huge for me. AB: Although the works you have created here for this imagined domestic space are functional – tables, chairs, a bench press – the materials and forms you have incorporated make it obvious that these objects are not to be handled. SS: These works are not utilitarian. I st…
Aída Rubio González. Florence, 2013. Oil on canvas, 146 x 195 cm. Courtesy Rosenfeld Porcini. … will be (2013), based on the movie Donnie Darko (RICHARD Kelly, 2001), both the viewer and the man in the picture look down on a boxed scene, in a stance suggesting that of the director. The sole film work in the exhibition is Blessed are you who come by Fatma Bucak (born 1982). Rich in its possible interpretations, this enigmatic and atmospheric video, shot on the Turkish-Armenian border against the backdrop of the remains of an early 12th century church, shows a group of village men as they watch a woman dressed in black carry out a curious ritual. Shot almost entirely from a fixed frame, this contemporary piece echoes the structure and content of the Old Masters amidst which it is being shown, and is, on many levels, the least dynamic and offers the least interwoven narrative of them all. Bringing together these works, juxtaposing their styles and contents, and contrasting their moral lessons, as well as being a fascinating exercise in and of itself, also vehemently contradicts t…
Cybernetic Serendipity: the computer and the arts. Edited by Jasia Reichardt. Published by Studio International (special issue), 1968. …tists, architects, theorists and critics included RICHARD Hamilton, Reyner Banham, Eduardo Paolozzi, Peter and Alison Smithson and Theo Crosby. Inspired by Scientific American, Wiener’s writings, Claude Shannon’s information theory, John von Neumann’s game theory and D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson’s book On Growth and Form, they became interested in the implications of science, new technology and the mass media for art and society. Of particular influence on the incubation of cyberart was the 1956 London exhibition This is Tomorrow, a model of collaborative art practice. The catalogue of this show contains the first British published reference to the possible use of computers in art. The artists write of “punched tape … cards” and “motor and input instructions” as being potential tools and methods for art production.1 [image15] Roy Ascott, a student of Hamilton’s, continued the interest in communications systems and cybernetics in the early 60s by incorporating into …
V&A Museum, Dundee. Entrance. …, is already budgeted at a cost of £1.6 million. RICHARD Armstrong, New York director is quoted as saying “it is a very compelling opportunity to continue our investigations into the possibilities of global interchange”. The bid, if successful could lead to a 2017 opening. The likelihood is that an architect from Finland would be appointed in this case, where there is no shortage of talent. Such a development clearly indicates that Dundee and the V&A have chosen the right model, as first exemplified by the Guggenheim and the City of Bilbao, but with local variability.…


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