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Nicolas Poussin (1594–1665). <em>The Nature of Bacchus</em>.<strong></strong> Paris, Louvre …nvestigation of the power of the colour green. As RICHARD Verdi said in the catalogue of 1995: With its dense undergrowth and umbrageous trees, the picture is pervaded by an intoxicating range of greens that evoke nature in its primordial state. Scarcely less visionary is the composition of the scene, which violates all the conventions of classical art in its abrupt and mysterious spatial elisions and dramatic distortions of size. These combine to conjure forth thoughts of the most wondrous and inexplicable forces in nature and reveal the aged Poussin immersed in the mystery of creation and awed by its elemental power.1 The Royal Academy catalogue gave us the information that this work had once belonged to Reynolds, and had inspired two poems by Sacheverell Sitwell. RICHARD Verdi claims, and rightly, that this painting is actually, 'An allegory of the circulation of water in nature'.1 Today this painting epitomises the appeal that Poussin, especially in his …
Martin Parr. Signs of the Times, England, 1991. C-type print, 51 x 61 cm. Martin Parr / Magnum Photos / Rocket Gallery. © Martin Parr / Magnum Photos. …r 2012 – 6 January 2013 by CELIA WHITE Artist RICHARD Learoyd recently described contemporary photography as a “regressive medium” whose technological innovation, ironically, has led it “back to a sort of Kodak infancy”.1 This is evident not only in fine art photography, but also in the everyday use of the medium: Facebook’s Instagram software, for instance, mimics the aesthetics – the shape, colour and the vignetting effects – of prints from early Polaroid and Kodak Instamatic cameras. But the regression to which Learoyd refers is not only the intervention of the past into the current development of photography; it is a simultaneous psychological regression, as far-reaching as the popular appetite for taking and sharing photos, in which we yearn for the ‘Kodak moment’ – for a vision of the past with which to frame our present. Two photographic exhibitions currently on show in London deal with the relationship between this psychological or sentimental and thi…
Phyllida Barlow. Untitled: stackboxtube2015, 2015, Cardboard, plywood, scrim, cement, plaster, tape, paint, spray paint, PVA, 174 x 80 x 105 cm. Photograph: Alex Delfanne.
Courtesy of the Artist and Hauser & Wirth. …sts from the UK, Germany and Holland - among them RICHARD Wentworth, Phyllida Barlow, Rachel Whiteread, RICHARD Deacon, Tony Carter and Michael Craig-Martin - curated by the Griffin Gallery’s Becca Pelly-Fry and sculptor Steve Johnson. But it is the discoveries among the 33 artists here that bring, to my mind, the revelations, in their careful interrogation not of grandiose architectural themes but the telling details of our everyday encounters with landscapes great and small. And for that, we have to thank Johnson, whose own work is, as Pelly-Fry puts it, a celebration of “the poetry of the every day”. The initial inspiration came from a lecture Johnson gave in 2012, called Architecture as Metaphor, which explored “how art since the medieval period has represented or manipulated the built environment”. His selected illustrations were: Stefano di Giovanni’s The Ecstasy of St Francis (1437-44), Vermeer’s Girl Asleep at a Table (1657), Edward Ho…
Susan 
      Rothenberg, <i>Red Studio</i>, 2003-2002. Oil on canvas / 63 x 58 ins / 
      160 x 147.3 cms …ory. Former occupants included Robert Motherwell, RICHARD Lippold, RICHARD Serra and Nancy Graves. She danced, became involved in Process Art and was influenced by many artists including Eva Hesse. She began to survive financially, independent of her family. The collaborative spirit of the 1970s reduced the power of the market to determine the object. Performance art replaced 'art as commodity'. The umbrella term 'post-minimalism' referred to much of the activity that took place in the name of art to define the break from pristine, precise, defined. The random and accidental were central to the process. Autobiography was an acknowledged source. 1969 saw major exhibitions of abstract and conceptual art such as 'Anti-Illusion: Procedures/ Materials' (Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Eva Hesse, RICHARD Serra). Against this background, the exhibition of three lifesize camels by Nancy Graves caused a stir. In 1970 Rothenberg was one of a number of artists employed to fabricate the camels' leg…
Anish Kapoor. <em>Marble</em>, 2002. … by a lyrical monologue which at times approached RICHARD Burton's reading of Under Milk Wood in timbre and musicality. The other two films were not as arresting - I preferred Christian Jankowski's slightly bizarre 'Puppet Conference', on show in the two identically arranged stalls of Klosterfelde (Berlin). This cloning idea was the brainchild of Elmgreen & Dragset, who even arranged a look-alike gallery owner. The fact that I didn't spot this detail until the second day says much for the disorientation Frieze induced. Another project was Michael Beutler's installation 'next to center', a series of box-like spaces constructed from wire mesh and decorated with found pieces of card and brightly coloured paper. As the artist had envisaged, the installation acted as a social space, providing a place for tired fairgoers to hole up and rest, or camp out under its reclaimed awnings and towering cubes. Elsewhere, the Interlopers Hiking Club had erected a sturdier kind of tent, i…
Walter Sickert. <em>La Guiseppina Against A Map of Venice</em>, 1903. Oil on canvas, 508 x 406 mm. Private collection, © Estate of Walter R. Sickert. All rights reserved, DACS 2008. …t’s late work prefigures pop art, first made by RICHARD Morphet, ‘The Modernity of Late Sickert’, Studio International, Vol. 190, July/August 1975 and recently rehearsed by Rebecca Daniels, ‘Press Art: The Late Oeuvre of Walter RICHARD Sickert’, Apollo, October 2002.…
Wassily Kandinsky. Murnau with Church II, 1910. Oil on canvas, 96 x 105.5 cm. Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven. …lly (and in the catalogue eloquently by Professor RICHARD Thomson). Various sorties undertaken in the period by such painters as Walter Crane, George Frederick Watts, the Swedish painter Jens Willumsen and Georges Lacombe reflect an ambivalent escapism, shading into episodic expressions of the same inclination by Munch and Ensor. Here it is symbolically the sun which offers salvation for all, in a further climacteric section, and dramatically portrayed by an early Piet Mondrian entitled simply, Woods near Oele, (l908). Vertical trees and shadowy reflections run with horizontal terrain against a wavering sun, as Thomson says: “to suggest a transitory state on the way to enlightenment.” But for Mondrian, as for us all, it can only in its emblematic fragility, convey a human aspiration and, no more. Certain works by landscapists such as Charles Filger, Emile Bernard, Georges Lacombe and Harald Sohberg are joined by the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art's own masterly, Lake Thun…
Leo Warner, director of 59 Productions. … fellow directors, Mark Grimmer, Lysander Ashton, RICHARD Slaney and Anna Jameson, have worked consistently in theatre, notably with the National Theatre of Scotland, with Rufus Norris on the international hit War Horse, and on multiple productions with director Katie Mitchell. Their pioneering methods of “live film-making” have won them a slew of Olivier and Tony awards, and they have produced visually spectacular shows for the biggest names in theatre, including the National Theatre and Royal Opera House in London and the Metropolitan Opera in New York. In 2017, they brought all the key creative and production skills in-house, including their own architecture department, celebrating with an adaptation of Paul Auster’s City of Glass. Warner, as design director, has overseen many of the company’s most visually and technically ambitious productions. Most recently, he directed a groundbreaking commission from Manchester International Festival to realise a stage version of Italo …
Adam Magyar. Stainless, Xidan, 2014 (Beijing). High speed video, 9 min 25 sec, edition 1/3. … by Wilhelm Mundt (2008) and Leuk Stone Circle by RICHARD Long (2000). Scattered, composed, stacked, embedded, painted and glued, rocks ousted the vitrine as the cool embodiment of concept. On the wane, at least by dealer choice, were photography and video – though the exceptions were strong: high-definition works by Brian Bress sold well at Cherry and Martin at the fair’s Nova section, as did Adam Magyar’s super-slow-motion videos at Julie Saul and the Edward Burtynskys at Howard Greenberg. Sex snuck in, as though by a back door, at Kicken Berlin’s Kabinett showing of German photographers, with Helmut Newton’s frontal nude fashion models, but the druggy nude males and nude Tracey Emin moments of past years are snuffed out. And not one 3D-printed work could I find – each time I thought to uncover one, it turned out to be painstakingly crafted by hand. It seems that, although home-printer prices are tumbling, they can turn out only very small pieces, making large work coun…
Celia Scott’s studio, 2000. Plaster casts, clockwise from below: MJ Long, Richard Meier, Celia Scott. Photo © Peter Cook …individuals, chiefly architects - James Stirling, RICHARD Meier, Michael Graves, Peter Eisenman, Sandy Wilson, Ed Jones, MJ Long, Alan Colquhoun, John Miller and Colin Rowe - would be to realise, from the temporary hush, that one has stumbled into a hall of fame. The sculptor Celia Scott herself has seldom seen them all together. It might indeed by a slightly intimidating experience. Does one apologise and retract one's steps, backwards through the door? Celia Scott, as the courage and perception of her work now reveals, carries right on inside, and the conversation resumes. In this imaginary scenario the participants form loose groups: Jim Stirling, Ed Jones, Eduardo Paolozzi and Rita Wolf in one corner. Alan Colquhoun, John Miller, Michael Graves and RICHARD Meier opposite, with MJ Long, Sandy Wilson, Leon Krier and Colin Rowe in animated argument in the centre. For if anyone would be in the centre, it would have to be Colin Rowe. In reality this never quite happened. And now their …
Snøhetta expansion of the new SFMOMA, 2016. Photograph: © Henrik Kam, courtesy SFMOMA. …gh the new Howard Street entrance; spiral through RICHARD Serra’s torqued, 213-ton Corten steel sculpture Sequence, across the swath of free public space given over to hanging out under the vast Alexander Calder mobile, and up the maplewood stairway to the second-floor atrium. Metaphor for the window newly opened on black artists, blank walls await two vast murals by Julie Mehretu and a third holds an outsized painting by Mark Bradford. Check out the Frida Kahlo material and the storied Mark Rothko No 14, then head past the elevators painted red, which open on to the Botta building’s several hundred modern masterworks – Henri Matisse, Jackson Pollock, Pablo Picasso – from the Albert M Bender collection, to the silver elevators that access all floors of the new viewing spaces. Each has its own logic, one which, in keeping with the current push against linear installation, is geared more to impact than chronology, so you can navigate them at will. Being a best-fi…
TU ES PETRUS …ty and now a venue for the Liverpool Biennale by RICHARD CARR Carved in polystyrene, and held in position by bands of red fabric, the figure was installed in March when it called to mind St Peter's role in building the Catholic church and the current precarious state of religion. The installation was a dramatic reinvigoration of the interior of a building which, built in 1788, has sadly outlived its original purpose. Commissioned for the Biennale, the installation titled Tu Es Petrus, was by the Maltese artist, Norbert Francis Attard. St Peter is, of course, a distinctive figure in the history of Catholicism in Malta and it is interesting to observe the artist making connections between his own culture and the location of this installation in Liverpool. However, because the director of the Biennale decided to give St Peter's Church to another artist, Attard's installation had to be removed. Instead, he was given The Oratory close to the Anglican cathedral where he has created anothe…
38. RB Kitaj
…e backburner. On the occasion of the former show, RICHARD Morphet requoted Kitaj's statement from Walter Sickert, which he had used in his catalogue introduction for the 1980 National Gallery exhibition entitled 'The Artist's Eye': And this, gentlemen of the press, curators, critics, experts and others is the claim we painters make in regard to the Old Masters. They are ours, not yours. We have their blood in our veins. We are their heirs, executors, assignees, trustees. We are the pious sons, but henceforth it is we who are the interpreters of their wishes, with full power to set them aside and substitute their own, whenever and wherever it seems fit for us to do so. They would have wished it so.1 As the then Director of the National Gallery, Neil MacGregor, said at the time of 'Kitaj: in the aura of Cezanne and other Masters': From his [Cezanne's] work and in particular from the National Gallery's 'Bathers', Kitaj has forged a new language of anger and distress - and of the …
Ed Moses. Untitled, 1975-77. Acrylic and masking tape on Strathmore Board, 61 x 41 1/2 in (framed) (154.9 x 105.4 cm). Image courtesy Albertz Benda. …nd prognosticators – the Guggenheim’s RICHARD Armstrong and Thomas Krens among them – were to be found at what must be called the show of the moment. Ed Moses: Painting as Process, curated at Albertz Benda by the legendary Barbara Rose, is a mini-retrospective of epic dimensions that raises the gallery’s profile to museum level with a storied oeuvre that has informed 60 years of West Coast art and marches it boldly forward into its seventh decade. In the 1980s, when I was immersed in the Los Angeles art scene – reporting on a hard-drinking, weed-smoking, skirt-chasing dude-bunch involving Billy Al Bengston, Ed Ruscha, Larry Bell, John Altoon, Eric Orr, Ken Price, Ron Cooper, Peter Alexander, Tony Berlant and Dennis Hopper – Ed Moses was already up there with RICHARD Diebenkorn, John McLaughlin and Sam Francis. Name a roster, he was on it; a museum, he was in it. He had already introduced his signature grid, and worked it to what we thought at the t…
Donald Judd, <em>Untitled</em> 1962. Cadmium red oil on liquitex and sand on masonite with yellow plexiglass. 122 x 243.8 6.4 cm. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. ARTS© 2004 Judd Foundation/ Licensed by VAGA, New York/DACS, London …conversion of American towns into 'strip' cities. RICHARD Shiff observed Judd's reactions: Things were happening and the changes were visible, but few who noticed were thoughtful about it, and no one was supervising. If the cultural environment was bleak and the situation of the artist out-of-control, good work nevertheless continued during the 1970s and 1980s, even if to little effect in the face of the postmodernism vogue and an attitude on the part of the critics, 'that art should be democratic'. It was a position that might be nobly motivated, however misguided; but all too often, like other politicised aesthetic stances, it was merely opportunistic.4 The notion of quality in art became increasingly unpopular and deemed politically incorrect. Judd, however, objected claiming that, 'Politics alone should be democratic … art is intrinsically a matter of quality'. Like that very different commentator, Peter Fuller in Britain in the 1980s, Judd was not remotely hesitant in his …
René Magritte. Le Modèle rouge III (The Red Model III), 1937. Oil on canvas, 206 x 158 x 5cm. 
Collection: Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam. © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2015 © DACS & The Estate of René Magritte. …tant role for the National Galleries of Scotland. RICHARD Calvocoressi, director of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art from 1987-2007, brokered a permanent acquisition of many works from the collection that Penrose had built up during a lifetime of supporting artists. Penrose grew up in Scotland and studied architecture at Cambridge, after which he began making art. He moved to France, following his artistic dreams to the heart of the surrealist movement, where he met and became friends with Pablo Picasso and Ernst, among other artists. A 1932 portrait of Penrose’s first wife, Valentine Boué, by Ernst, a colourful patchwork of shapes framing Valentine’s face, hangs in the exhibition nearby a 1937 portrait by Picasso of Penrose’s second wife, Lee Miller, an asymmetric figure with green hair and a yellow face. Penrose played an important role promoting surrealist artists in the UK. He was an organiser of the International Surrealist Exhibition in London…
Danny Fox painting at Tim Noble and Sue Webster's studio in London, 2015. Photograph: Jack Whitefield. …f looks ahead with his teeth exposed. Inspired by RICHARD Simkin’s watercolours, Fox made these paintings while splitting his time between Los Angeles, St Ives, where he was born, and London, and he suggests that the image of a man on a horse is representative of change. Jessica Draper: How do you work? Danny Fox: I usually get in at 11 in the morning and leave around 7pm. If I’m on a roll, I stay until 10. It’s not a really long day, but I’m moving these big paintings around all day, working on this scale makes it a long day. It is beginning to fuck me up. I think I’ve got exhaustion or something. This show has been physically demanding to make; mentally, also. I’m going to go abroad for a while after this, and this is the next show [he gestures to some rolled canvases] ready to go. After this show, I don’t want to be left with no work, so these are for a New York show next year. JD: Do you make sketches? DF: I made a lot of sketches for this show. Because the painti…
Janet Biggs, Space Between Fragility Curves, 2018 (detail). Two-channel, HD video installation with sound. Courtesy of the artist, Cristin Tierney Gallery, New York, NY, Analix Forever, Geneva, Switzerland, and CONNERSMITH, Washington, DC. …h original compositions by musicians Anna Savery, RICHARD Savery and William Martina. The score (accompanied by sounds such as wind that lend their own music to the mix) is integral to the unspooling visuals. It is often haunting, emphasising the loneliness of her chosen places, and adds momentum, emotional and psychological depth, and even scale, to the narrative, assuming, as a subject, an even more prominent role in this body of work. [image4] The other venue is the Museo de la Ciencia y el Cosmos in nearby La Laguna. Equally stunning, the projections here consist of a four-channel and a two-channel video installation, the filmed locations similar with the addition of a music studio. The former, Seeing Constellations in the Darkness between Stars, focuses on the interdependency of art and science, specifically music and technology. Jason Barnes, a drummer who uses a prosthetic limb following the amputation of his lower arm, is shown expertly playing with both his whole and prosthe…
Leon Underwood. <em>Totem to the Artist</em>, 1925–30. Wood and metal, 110.5 x 25.4 x 27.3 cm. Photo Tate, London 2010. Copyright the artist estate. …e in the urban environment. Another revelation is RICHARD Hamilton and Victor Pasmore’s proto-installation, an exhibit, first shown in 1957. The work is an arrangement of perspex sheets suspended from the ceiling to create a maze of coloured squares in space. It’s a bit like walking through a Mondrian painting, and pinpoints one of the key themes in the exhibition: physicality and the relationship between the audience and the three-dimensional object. In a very acute way, the curators force us to think about not only how we look at sculpture, but how we physically engage with it. Challenging expectations is another central feature of the exhibition; Anthony Caro’s Early One Morning (1962), an enormous pillar-box red, arrangement of long cylindrical tubes, i-beams and flat sheets of aluminium, is presented not as a radical shift in British sculpture as it is usually identified, but as a continuum and fusion of the concerns about flatness and roundness, plane and depth found in th…
Cyberman Helmet, 1985. Courtesy Chris Balcombe. Photograph: Chris Balcombe. …ows, including successes by Michael Craig-Martin, RICHARD Wentworth, Susan Hiller, Tacita Dean, Mark Wallinger and now 2008 Turner prize-winner Mark Leckey (born 1964). The idea of such exhibitions, according to Hayward Touring, is to open up new and unexpected approaches to exhibition-making, as well as to give special insights into the artists’ own deeper preoccupations. In the case of Leckey, the visitor is treated to a spectacular cabinet of curiosities, ranging across the categories of human, animal, and technology, exploring a mind that is as much scientist as it is artist, as much crazy inventor as it is mad professor. The exhibition’s title, The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things, comes from a concept in computing that refers to a network of everyday objects, all communicating with one another, and Leckey’s main precept for the show is his belief that the further technology evolves, the more our minds devolve back to the imaginings of our superstitious past. What, …
Gilles Barbier. A Very Old Thing, 2015. Mixed media, 70 7/8 x 70 7/8 x 45 1/4 in. 1/3 (Edition of 3 + 1 AP). Courtesy galerie Georges-Philippe & Nathalie Vallois, Paris. Photograph: JC Lett. … moved on. But George Lucas looked at everything, RICHARD Meier smiled approval, and many I spoke to commented favourably on the fresh look derived from a directorial decision to pare down to 199 dealers and sacrifice a few worthy galleries in favour of scrappier ones. Let the salon of the rejected moan on (purveyor of 20th-century master photographs Howard Greenberg was “pissed” to be have been “shoved up” to Pier 92), it was grand to come upon On Stellar Rays, a small, feisty gallery from the Lower East side. This year’s focus on the Middle East was held welcome, too, as much for the quality of the material presented as for its political undertone. It’s about time that the charged photographic dioramas of Ahmed Mater, a star of the 2013 Sharjah Biennial, were headlined here. Overall, there were no big surprises, and few duds, but rather aisle after aisle of curated booths showing, for the most part, thoughtful work that was fairly evenly distributed between painting, scu…
Dom … a new picturesque. Painters emerged too, such as RICHARD Wilson, to consolidate the combination. Even Thomas Gainsborough lent his talent as a portrait painter to the embellishment of this affluent landed class. The fact is that Palladianism came to fruition in England 150 years after its originator had flourished in Venice. Indeed by Continental standards it was far out-of-date. Yet it caught on, suiting the British sensibility for the controlled but not excessive enhancement of “standing” in the fluid social climate of the 18th century. Later, awareness of the French Revolution and disenchantment with the brutalising aspects of the slave trade proved the wisdom of this preference. Palladio had himself carefully incorporated, to a limited degree, garden architecture and riverscape into his design, a precedent to later English developments. In the 16th century region of the Veneto, the already formal-functional patterns of the landscape would accommodate readily a villa as…
Cover illustration of the fourth issue of Archigram magazine.

        Credit: Archigram. …piece of this philosophy, RICHARD Rogers and Norman Foster emerged as its fashioners and engineers, Peter Rice and Anthony Hunt emerged as its boffins. There was no need for a detached avant-garde: time for that could not be wasted if the future was really to happen - now. (Peter Cook, The Architectural Review, July 1983) Just over the shoulder of Swiss Re stands the still shining Lloyds building by RICHARD Rogers, the other leading architect of the interim period who, it has to be admitted, also drew inspiration from Archigram. Posterity stands quaking, and ready to forget such original sourcing today. One is tempted to indulge in the historian Andrew Roberts' party game of 'what if … '. What if Archigram had got off the …
Brice Marden. <em>Grove Group II</em>, 1972-73; Private Collection, fractional gift to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; © 2006 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. …l to this, although not painters, artists such as RICHARD Long and Robert Smithson have renewed human awareness of the ancient and yet wholly contemporary reference of the land with a profound set of markers for future exploration. The German painter Gerhard Richter can be viewed as a primary example of 'mediator'. In an interview with Robert Storr,1 he clarified this: RS: Do you, in fact, view your abstract paintings as being as much about the yearning for transcendent states of being as the landscapes are about a yearning for the beauty found in nature? GR: If I understand you correctly, I would say that the landscapes are closer to such an intention than the abstract paintings. They are further removed from a stated intention to be models of reality. In Richter's case, his paintings of this type are indifferent to the actual needs of the observer, and it could be said that the execution of the painting itself is subordinated to the mechanical aberration of the process of looking.…
<i>Three Studies of Isabel Rawsthorne</i>, 1967. Oil on canvas (triptych). 
        Three panels, each 35.5 x 30.5 cm. Private collection © The Estate 
        of Francis Bacon / DACS, London, 2005 … of Visual Arts at the British Council; RICHARD Calvocoressi, Director of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art; and Christoph Heinrich, Chief Curator of Contemporary Art at the Hamburger Kunsthalle. RICHARD Calvocoressi's searching essay, Bacon: Public and Private, examines recent scholarship since Bacon's death in 1992. It has revealed the sources of his imagery and examined his work in the context of 'European high culture'. Calvocoressi lists Michelangelo, Velázquez, Rembrandt, Ingres, Degas, Van Gogh and Picasso as the artists Bacon appropriated and assimilated. 'The motifs and subjects that obsessed him were: papal imagery; curtains and veils; the open mouth; the cage; circular forms, spaces and structures; the male human body; portraiture; mirrors and reflections; the shadow; the Crucifixion; …


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