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Richard Smith. Untitled, 2002. Oil on canvas, 263 x 218 cm. © Richard Smith Foundation, courtesy Flowers Gallery London and New York. … This is the first posthumous exhibition of RICHARD Smith, who died last year, and whose work straddled pop and abstract art Flowers Gallery, London 9 June – 15 July 2017 by SAM CORNISH RICHARD Smith died last year at the age of 84, during the run of an exhibition of his prints in his home town of Letchworth Garden City. Work of Five Decades at Flowers Gallery in Cork Street is the first posthumous London showing of the artist, who had been permanently resident in the United States since 1978. Early in his career, Smith appeared in the group exhibitions Place, 1959, and Situation, 1960, now considered important moments in the story of abstract art in Britain. His 1975 Tate retrospective reunited all the works included in five of his previous exhibitions, starting with his first solo exhibition, at the now celebrated Green Gallery in New York, and also including those with Kasmin in London and the Galleria dell’Ariete in Milan. The Tate show was badly received and, after the 70s…
Richard Long. <em>Installation photograph</em>, 2009. Copyright the artist. Photocredit: Tate Photography …n UK TV) and the gently caressing manner in which RICHARD Long’s works address the English landscape, and indeed the planetary land mass. He too denotes these in terms of stone circles, rocks, or pathways gently laid on the surface, always on the surface. How would Astronaut Long have visited the lunar surface? Far more gently than even gravity absence, allows. On earth, for Long, there is seldom any disruption by digging or excavation. Sometimes these impressions were even made by laying stones under water on a riverbed, as he has in the Little Pigeon River amidst the Great Smoky Mountains in Tennessee. The simple, pioneer namings of the landscape features of the mid-West suit Long’s poetic discourse rather better even than in England. The Three Day Triangular Walk between the Sources of the River Tamar (34 miles): from the source of the River Tamar to Exe Head (41 miles) and from Exe Head to East Dart Head (44 miles) in 1978, do seem needlessly complex and challenging but were th…
Current day Sainsbury Centre, 2009. Photograph: © Sainsbury Centre, Pete
Huggins. …g designs of architects such as Norman Foster and RICHARD Rogers in the latter half of the last century Sainsbury’s Centre for Visual Arts, University of East Anglia, Norwich 24 March – 2 September 2018 by VERONICA SIMPSON An unusual quality of light and weightlessness characterises the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts at the University of East Anglia. Standing inside this vast, 1978, steel-frame, prefabricated shed, it feels like being enveloped in a soft, cuboid cloud: a silvery sort of daylight filters around the shuttering pinned to the porous metal frame, while bigger slabs of light penetrate deep into the building from huge glazed walls at either end; its distinctive, cloud-like sensibility is intensified by the thick, grey, wall-to-wall carpeting that mutes all sound – even conversation - to a soft, dreamlike murmur. [image2] Designed by Sir Norman Foster and his wife Wendy (née Cheesman), soon after they had set up Foster Associates, in spirit, this structure is lig…
Robert Longo. Untitled (Election Day 2016), 2017. Charcoal on mounted paper, 152.4 x 109.9 cm. Courtesy Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac London · Paris · Salzburg. Photograph: Artist Studio. …g in the air. JL: I love the tales of installing RICHARD Serra sculptures, where they have to tear down a wall to bring the piece inside. RL: RICHARD Serra is one of my godfathers. I started an alternative space in Buffalo [the Hallwalls Contemporary Art Centre]. Cindy Sherman and I worked together there for several years. People would come and get snowed in, and RICHARD was once snowed in with us for about seven days. As a young artist, I wanted to know everything that he had in his brain. We became friends and, whenever I see RICHARD now, it is always this big joke. He leans over to me and whispers in my ear: “You’re still making big art, right?” Like I'm part of some weird fraternity, trying to make things that are physically challenging. JL: And also like Serra’s paintings, your drawings are largely in monochrome. RL: When my younger son was a kid, he said to me: “Why do you work in black and white?” And I was looking at an old copy of Life magazine, showing him bom…
Howard Hodgkin. Americana, 1999-2001. Oil on wood, 91 x 110.5 cm …r of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, RICHARD Calvocoressi points out that while Hodgkin's pictures are immediately recognisable, they do not hang easily together. The exhibition of small paintings in 1990 was hung so that each painting had its own wall thus enabling it to be viewed in a self-contained situation. In the summer exhibition the walls were painted a dark colour to create a space that is 'more amorphous, less immediately defined'. Regarding the question of scale, Calvocoressi notes, 'With small paintings he does not have to worry so much about the picture surface. "It's easy to make a window, a hole in the wall, into which the viewer can look". With large, human-scale paintings, Hodgkin is still trying to give the illusion of "a space that is a box - a notional interior", but he also feels it is vital to manipulate the picture surface and the architecture of the painting in such a way that the viewer can relate to it piecemeal as well as seeing the whole thing'.…
<p>Vladimir Tatlin …dence of surviving architectural examples made by RICHARD Pare over the past 15 years, and itself also continuing. And this realisation hopefully will prompt a fuller building conservation system than had earlier been in place through international support. It must be said that where major exhibitions are concerned, and not unusually in intensely competitive curatorial and academic circles, there is a noticeable shortfall in collaboration. For example, Tate Modern in London had mounted their own fine blockbuster exhibition in 2009, curated by Margarita Tupitsyn, entitled Rodchenko and Popova: Defining Constructivism; she also edited and contributed to that ground-breaking catalogue. Yet here a scholar/curator as important as Tupitsyn is merely footnoted just once in the current Royal Academy catalogue (p.97, Footnote 7). Her own work is not acknowledged in the listing: nor yet, is her Tate catalogue6 although of central significance even mentioned in the schedule of titles for Further …
Alvin Langdon Coburn. <em>Duncan Grant. </em>© George Eastman House, International Museum of Photography and Film. …nal freedom and were aggressively unconventional. RICHARD Shone in his excellent study, Bloomsbury Portraits: Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, and their circle, wrote: The lifestyle they embraced was a complex mixture of inheritance and personal preference. There was a touch of camping out, a happy domestic improvisation which comically clashed with sturdy middle-class comfort and fastidious culture. There was nothing precious about it, though aesthetic enjoyment of one’s surroundings was often placed before other considerations. To some it seemed intolerably Bohemian and haphazard, to others, too ample and not Bohemian enough. Against such a background went hard work and constant occupation.1 The exhibition is divided into six sections. The first: Bloomsbury before Bloomsbury explores Bell’s interpretation of recent visual traditions, particularly French intimiste painting. The second section: The Exotic, the Oriental and the Orna…
Maggie's Centre, Kirkcaldy, Fife. Credit: Werner Huthmacher. … 'Maggie's Centre'. The Edinburgh-based architect RICHARD Murphy was chosen to develop the designs to a very detailed, yet open, brief from Maggie herself with Charles at her side, and a sheltered sanctuary site was developed a short walk from the hospital. Now, the tenth anniversary of the founding of the first Maggie's Centre has just passed and this has been celebrated in a remarkable way by the establishment of no less than the fifth Maggie's Centre at Kirkcaldy in Fife, Scotland. It so happens that others are planned, with one by RICHARD Rogers next to Charing Cross Hospital in London, one still unsited at Addenbrooke's in Cambridge by Daniel Libeskind, one planned by Chris Wilkinson of Wilkinson Eyre for Oxford's Radcliffe Infirmary, one by the Japanese architect Kisho Kurokawa in South Wales and others are in the pipeline. Until this year, the superb Maggie's Centre at Dundee's Ninewells Hospital, designed by Frank Gehry, has been the star performance. The other c…
Richard Sides. Party politics, 2016. Installation view (1). …tion what we really desire from life.” This was RICHARD Sides (b1985) commenting on his installation Stop Killing My Buzz (2012) at the Zabludowicz Collection in 2012. Fast-forward to 2016 and these words still ring true in his latest exhibition, Invisible World, at Carlos/Ishikawa. Sides has continually commented on how the relationships we have with our environments invariably affect our personal desires and the course in which they may or may not manifest themselves. In the context of his exhibitions, he has always displayed an ontological awareness of how the space can trigger particular feelings and emotions in the audience if used in certain ways. This exhibition fully demonstrates Sides’s confidence and ability to transform the space to support themes concerning temporality, spatiality, presence, desire and ontology. On entry, the visitor will come across a ringbinder by the door. This is not a guest sign-in book, but the beginning of the show. The ringbinder, entitled Dire…
Johannes Kahrs. <em>93'09,</em> 1997. Oil on canvas, 190 x 290 cm. © The artist, Collection SMAK, Ghent © DACS 2007 …iaodong - they line up loosely with a second row, RICHARD Artschwager, Vija Celmins, Judith Eisler, Wilhelm Sasnal, Eberhard Havekost and Johannes Kahrs. All are individual experimentalists, and there is little interaction. For example, the last two, Berlin artists Havekost and Kahrs, were included notably in a recent published survey2 and they have little enough in common. That is the form across the board. Recent, grudging London press comment about the exhibition has complained that the number of works focusing on 'backs' of people is 'astonishing'; but in fact, of the 100 works on show in the exhibition, less than 20 actually focus on such human rears. Only Pistoletto, Morley, Hockney, Gertsch, Kippenberger, Tuymans, Dumas, Doig, Kandl and Eisler seem noticeably to be prone to backs. The Pistoletto 'Ragazza che cammina' is a masterly, fully clad posterior of great charm, confounding the low level of critique of the show so far. This exhibition may indeed…
<i>TheArtist's Garden at Vétheuil</i>, 1881 © National Gallery 
        of Art, Washington DC …ked up. In his Introduction, curator RICHARD Thomson, continues: Both on the wall and in the catalogue, the exhibition looks closely at Monet's considerable achievements as a painter of plein-air landscape. But this goes beyond scrutiny of a major figure within the Impressionist movement. The exhibition asks - and asks the visitor to ask - the questions Monet put to himself in these years. What was the essence of landscape painting? How might this be achieved? How might one follow one's own sensations, achieve one's own instinctive goals in the representation of nature? How did one organise paint in ways that were at once descriptive and expressive? These were probing questions about the nature of painting and the future of art.2 A brief holiday with his…
<i>To a Summer's Day</i>, 1980. Acrylic on canvas, 115.5 x 281 cm. Tate. 
        Purchased 1982 © 2003 Bridget Riley. … before the Tate exhibition she spoke to RICHARD Cork: It’s a very unsympathetic time for creative arts at the moment, and dealers have a lot to answer for. The values that a real artist holds have not been in harmony with society.3 One of Britain’s leading abstract artists, Riley is also rooted in the Romantic tradition. Inspired by nature, from the Cornish coast where she grew up, she aspires to translate nature, to find visual equivalents for states of mind. Lubbock describes Riley’s recent work thus: All the work in the Nineties is only a step from landscape, a glimmering view of leaves and water and light. With the recent emergence of sinuous curves among the diagonals, nature is here in all but name.4 Quoting …
Richard Hamilton, Interior II, 1964. Tate
© The estate of Richard Hamilton. …ective of one of the founding artists of Pop Art, RICHARD Hamilton (1922-2011), inhabits 18 rooms at Tate Modern, detailing his 60-year career and, in so doing, a history of postwar pop culture and British public perception of the world. Whether impressed by Hamilton’s exceptional and innovative techniques in painting and collage, or curious to see an original take on modern British history, the exhibition will satisfy and fascinate most who attend. From early exhibition designs of the 1950s, a print of the famous Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing? (1956), epic paintings of Mick Jagger and Tony Blair, to the wide range of subject matter that the artist considered in his work, everything that filtered through to pop culture and awareness has some part to play in the exhibition. I was particularly drawn to Hamilton’s overtly political art, such as Treatment Room (1984), an installation that shows a hospital bed wired up to a TV screen flashing ima…
The Lost Vanguard: Russian Modernist Architecture 1922-1932RICHARD Pare and Jean-Louis Cohen. Introduction by Phyllis Lambert New York: Monacelli Press, 2007 This remarkable survey was synchronised with an exhibition of the same title presented at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, from July to October 2007. It fills a major gap in modernist studies, describing the extraordinary surge of commissioned modern buildings that occurred after the Russian Revolution and continued until after Lenin's death. It is the first fully illustrated survey of Russian modernism in the critical decade 1922-1932. It follows a Soviet compendium, Pioneers of Soviet Architecture: The Search for New Solutions in the 1920s and 1930s, assembled by the historian Selim O Khan-Magomedov, published in 1987 in London (and in 1983 in Dresden) and edited by Catherine Cooke, herself author of Russian Avant-Garde: Theories of Art, Architecture and the City. Her early death was a major blow to research in this field. Earth-moving events have shaken the world since, over two…
The architecture of hope: Maggie’s cancer caring centres, by Charles Jencks and Edwin Heathcote. …gie herself. Before she died, Edinburgh architect RICHARD Murphy had already been commissioned for the site, identified close by the hospital. The searing experience of Charles Jencks through his bereavement also now gave meaning and integrity to what was to be essentially a private sector, charitable venture. Such was the degree of all round commitment in the Maggie’s Board and supporters that work began on site very soon after. What is especially notable, as Charles Jencks emphasises here in his revealing introductory survey of present and future Maggie’s Centres, is the evolution here, of a new typological hybrid architecture, reflecting a growing tendency for hospital/health architecture itself, to “morph” into hybrid buildings. This is a global trend towards more humane and varied building types, where both in- and out-patients feel more at home than in the traditional hospital or healthcare buildings, reflecting hotel or village or even shrine or art gallery precedents. …
…win England Sant Fournier (1908-1969) and his son RICHARD, practising as England and England took up the challenge with a masterly showroom at Sliema, elegant in its articulated structure (1967). RICHARD England continued subsequently in sole practice, having trained under Gio Ponti in Italy. It was Ponti who gave England the confidence to design the dramatic hillside church of St Joseph, Manikata, fulfilling the latest Vatican edicts (1962–74). This incorporated the revisions in liturgy and spatial denomination in a new and revolutionary manner and rapidly became internationally renowned. It both reflected ancient agrarian store buildings and also incorporated something of the profile of a surfaced U-boat conning tower. Minus a campanile, it instead incorporated the cross on the side of this core, perhaps a reminder of Malta’s wartime experiences. Following this efflorescence of talent there was an overlay of commercial building for tourism, which overlaid the l950s buildings tha…
Gustavo Pérez Monzón. Portrait of the artist. Photo: Gabriel Batiz. © The Artist; Courtesy Richard Saltoun Gallery, London. …rez Monzón’s first London showing, mounted at RICHARD Saltoun, a gallery intent on presenting the work of historically important, if somewhat overlooked, artists. The centrepiece is an ethereal installation of crisscrossing thread connecting the gallery walls in an immersive, labyrinthine web, the work being one in the tradition of the artist’s three-dimensional Tramas, Hilos and Vilos series. Gustavo Pérez Monzon introduces Rosa de Cancio at RICHARD Saltoun gallery, London. Video by Laura Bushell. Also on display are a series of austerely elegant works in mixed media on board, again revealing a fascination with lines and grids, their often-metallic surfaces ranging from a muted lustre to a forthrightly mirrored finish. Some are punctuated by metallic bas-reliefs, suggestive of braille, an apt choice given Peréz Monzón’s interest in coded systems such as numerology. Angeria Rigamonti di Cutò: You were part of a first generation of artists to be shaped by the 1959 revol…
Richard Long. <em>Flash Flood </em>2004<em>. </em>Colour photograph with text, 83 x 114 cm/32.7 x 44.9 in. Courtesy: Haunch of Venison, London. Copyright: Richard Long, 2005. …anuary-10 February 2006 Since 1967, RICHARD Long has used walking as the basis of his artistic practice. What appears in the gallery may be a sculpture constructed from natural materials, a photograph of a sculpture made in situ, or a text, but none of these would be possible without the artist's walks: the experience of time and motion in the landscape finding its mode of expression and memorial. His most recent exhibition, at the Haunch of Venison gallery in London, is spread over three floors. The first floor displays three photos taken during the course of a 15-day walk in the semi-desert Karoo region of South Africa. 'Flash Flood' proclaims its title over a dark foreground of scrub, while storm clouds sweep dramatically across the ridges - almost a title still from a film. The other two photographs document sculptures Long has created: in 'Karoo Crossing', by scuffing into definition and bordering with stones two m…
Claudio Abate. Yvonne Rainer and Philip Glass, Lives of Performers at Music and Dance USA L'Attico, Rome, 1972. Vintage black and white photograph. Copyright the artist. Courtesy Richard Saltoun Gallery. … of a seminal book on the subject by Lea Vergine RICHARD Saltoun, London 9 October – 27 November 2015 by ANNA McNAY As early as 1918, German artist Oskar Schlemmer (1888-1943) wrote: “The new artistic medium is a much more direct one: the human body.”1 However, it was not until after the second world war that artists began en masse to turn away from more traditional media and show an interest in the body as a “vehicle for artistic discourse”.2 In the late 50s and early 60s, this new trend for “body art” began to be exploited as a way of laying claim to “being” and of experimenting with and creating new identities, investigating ideas of temporality, contingency and instability. However, much art from this period, in particular that of the Viennese actionists, has all too often been omitted from art histories on the grounds that it is too disturbing. Even sympathetic critics have frequently concluded that artists’ use of their bodies in their works is sometimes li…
Richard Long. Installation view (1). Lisson Gallery, London, 23 May – 12 July. Courtesy the artist and Lisson Gallery. …4 by HARRIET THORPE This exhibition of works by RICHARD Long from 1995 to 2014 documents the artist’s journeys through England, Switzerland and Antarctica. On the ground floor, Long brings slate rock and river mud into the gallery, and in the upper gallery, he provides windows into far-away locations through his photography and further mud works. Despite his adventures across the world, his work continues to follow a tried and tested path in assessing mankind’s connection with nature. Long’s sculptural installation Four Ways (2014) sits centrally in the Lisson gallery’s wide-windowed, street-facing ground-floor gallery room. Rocks of Delabole slate from Cornwall are ordered regimentally into a cross shape on the floor. Natural light reflects off the flat edges of the rocks, picking out highlights among the dense, asteroid-grey colour. These imperfect objects are brought under control by Long, who organises them neatly so that they fall into line like skyscrapers in Manhattan…
Richard Jackson: New Paintings. Hauser & Wirth, North Gallery, London, 23 May – 26 July 2014. …h, North Gallery, London 23 May – 26 July 2014 RICHARD Jackson (born 1939) has been a pre-eminent figure on the American art scene since the 70s and, in his current exhibition at Hauser & Wirth, he certainly leaves his mark. Influenced by both Abstract Expressionism and action painting, this show is a playful, yet disturbing synthesis of the two. The well-lit gallery is awash with colour – largely primary colours, black and white. The walls and floors are covered in paint splatters, splodges, drips and explosions. It is far more like a studio or warehouse than a gallery. Canvases are hung back to front, and paint pots and canisters lay strewn across the floor. The first thing you notice is the row of men, bent over, pants down, standing on crude plinths, seemingly drinking paint through pipe-like straws from canisters, before emitting the colours through their exposed anuses on to the wall behind. It is like boys competing over how far they can urinate, only this seems someh…
John Russell. Telepath, 2018. Installation view, The Gallery of Modern Art at Royal Exchange Square. Photograph: David Gibson. … Glasgow International, under the directorship of RICHARD Parry, has a plethora of exciting work. Below is a roundup of what’s on offer Glasgow 20 April – 7 May 2018 by DAVID GIBSON Now in its eighth edition, Glasgow International is the largest festival for contemporary visual art in Scotland. It seeks to represent some of the most exciting work being made in the city and around the world, showcasing Glasgow as a key location for the production of contemporary art. Under the guidance of new director RICHARD Parry, the festival has 40 solo exhibitions, more than 45 group shows, 268 artists from more than 30 countries showing work in 78 venues across the city, as well as more than 80 events associated with the programme, including performances, talks and screenings. The programme follows an established format comprising the director’s selection, commissioned or funded work and supported artists. The myriad range of exhibition venues are located across four quarters – City an…
Video review: Nostalgic for the Future. Lisson Gallery, London, November 2013. …rt & Language, Tony Cragg, Angela de la Cruz, RICHARD Deacon, Ceal Floyer, Ryan Gander, Shirazeh Houshiary, Peter Joseph, Anish Kapoor, John Latham, RICHARD Long, Jason Martin, Haroon Mirza, Jonathan Monk, Julian Opie and RICHARD Wentworth.…
Julian Opie. Julian, 2013. Archival inkjet laminated to glass. Edition of 35. Courtesy Julian Opie and Alan Cristea Gallery. … the tutors, though not in a mean way. I’d draw RICHARD Wentworth’s glasses and put “RICHARD Bloody Wentworth”. I knew he would be all right with that and it was a shared thing among the students: we all knew how great RICHARD Wentworth was as a tutor, yet he was so British with his glasses. I think I was extending that sense of interacting and expecting them to be looked at. It’s about offering some things, but at the same time refusing some things; being ugly as well as being attractive. • Julian Opie: Editions 2012-2015 is at the Alan Cristea Gallery in London from 5 June – 18 July 2015.  …
Richard Wilson. Block of Dering, 2017. Wood, 353 x 250 x 268 cm. Photograph: Miayko Narita. © Richard Wilson. Courtesy Annely Juda Fine Art. … by HARRIET THORPE Walking into Stealing Space, RICHARD Wilson’s new exhibition at Annely Juda Fine Art, is like visiting the workshop of the artist’s brain. Ceiling-skimming sculptures, experimental drawings and maquettes of realised and unrealised projects all communicate how he thinks about space – and how he keeps challenging us to think about space. Wilson’s vision for this exhibition is considerably more low-fi than his last major work, Slipstream (2014), an 80-metre long aluminium sculpture inspired by the aerodynamic velocity of a stunt plane twisting through the atrium of Heathrow’s new Terminal 2. In Stealing Space, we see him working on paper, and building with birch-ply-clad MDF (medium-density fibreboard) on a considerably smaller, domestic scale – yet still playfully interrogating the limits of the architectural space in the third-floor gallery at Annely Juda Fine Art, where he is showing for the first time. At the opening of Slipst…


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