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Robert Devereux at the opening of When the Heavens Meet the Earth at the Heong Gallery, Downing College, Cambridge, 24 February 2017. Photograph: Martin Kennedy. …aire, formerly a partner in the Virgin empire and RICHARD Branson’s brother-in-law, sold off two-thirds of his collection of postwar British art and used the £4 million proceeds to set up a charity supporting artists in Africa. The African Arts Trust, as it was named, supports grassroots organisations, which, in turn, support African artists with basic needs such as studios and residencies. The exhibition specifically seeks to include some lesser-known artists, but there are some established names as well, including El Anatsui, 2013 Turner Prize nominee Lynette Yiadom-Boakye and Ibrahim Mahama, who showed in Venice in 2015 and currently has an exhibition at White Cube Bermondsey, London. Another well-known name is the South African photographer Zanele Muholi, whose work with the LGBTQ community places her at continual risk in a censorious and critical society. Ranging across photography, painting, sculpture and film, the exhibition evidences the wealth of artistic creativ…
Andy Warhol. Vote McGovern, 1972. Colour screenprint. © 2016 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and DACS, London. …mous screenprint Vote McGovern (1972), which sees RICHARD Nixon dressed in pink, glowering up with demonic yellow eyes. Although this campaign poster didn’t succeed in preventing Nixon’s re-election, Warhol believed that the administration punished him [Warhol] for the insult by continuously scrutinising his tax records. Humour creeps in with the Guerrilla Girls, who astutely highlight the inequalities of the art world, inequalities we are still living with today. The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist (1988), a drily sarcastic lithographic list, includes, “Working without the pressure of success” and “Not having to undergo the embarrassment of being called a genius”. May Stevens pulls no punches either. Her screenprint Big Daddy With Hats (1971) presents us with a naked middle-aged man, a figure based on a photograph of her father, doughy, absurd, smug and patriotic. A bulldog sporting the stars and stripes sits on his lap, with its tongue lolling.…
Roy Lichtenstein  (1923-1997). <em>Femme au Chapeau</em>, 1962. Oil and Magna on canvas 68 x 56 in. (172.7 x 142.2 cm). Collection of Martin Z. Margulies. © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein …d with all the hoopla surrounding Picasso’s RICHARD J. Daley Center Monument in Chicago with a small soft cloth reconstruction of Picasso’s gigantic steel sculpture. Juxtaposing the 1960 "Painted Bronze" of two Ballantine Ale cans by Jasper Johns with Picasso’s odd painted sculpture "Absinthe Glass" (1914) does have its wry aesthetic point; but of all the artists in the show, Johns most disappoints. His addled, cliché-riddled autumnal "Seasons" (1985-1986) and other late paintings with their sometimes merely fleeting references to Picasso lack the brilliant, vibrant audacity of his now-classic studies of the residue of consumerism—his numbers, flags, maps, and targets. Just as the old Saturday Evening Post warned, "Pop art/ Op art/Soon will/Stop art," Picasso and America Art implies that Picasso’s influence, as well as twentieth-century American painting, died with Warhol and his fellow ironists. (Picasso’s death in 1973 provides a convenien…
Graceland, Memphis<br>
      …as, price $24.95 ISBN 0-7006-0948-2. RICHARD Carr …
Versace Spring/Summer 1994. Ballgown. Pale gray silk and metal georget. …sace had begun work with the fashion photographer RICHARD Avedon. This was the beginning of a long line of fashion campaigns by Mr Avedon. 1982 was a major year for Gianni Versace that began with the launch of his innovative 'Oroton' in his collection at the Paris Opera. This metal mesh that Versace invented contradicted all of the usual properties of metal. It could be used to make delicate, shimmering evening dresses for women. It was also possible to colour and pattern the revolutionary material, as Versace often did. It could be used alone, or mixed with a variation of fabrics and patterns. Unlikely combinations included Oroton with lace, chiffon, animal skin and lace. The designer used Oroton to make slinky, figure-hugging garments that would usually require the finest silks and most delicate chiffon. Although his revolutionary fashion design was at first criticised by the Parisian Haute Couture scene, fashion's fickle nature was soon shown when Versace's fame and recognition esc…
Ince 
      and Mayhew Cabinet and stand, c.1775. Satinwood with marquetry in engraved, 
      stained and shaded woods, the drawer fronts crossbanded with tulipwood and 
      ebony mouldings 103 x 51 x 213 cm © 2003 Collection Lord Lloyd-Webber<br>
      <br>
      …n Treuherz and Stephen Wildman and RICHARD Dorment introduce the artists and the themes raised by the exhibition, and work of this period. The collection is testament to Lloyd Webber's passion for art of the 19th century (incidentally, a passion he shares with another brilliant man of the theatre - fellow collector, Barry Humphries). This exhibition is another success for the Royal Academy. References 1. Timothy Hilton, The Pre-Raphaelites, Praeger Publishers, New York, 1974, p.32. 2. Ibid, pp. 33-34. 3. Ibid, p. 52. …
William Blake. Satan Before the Throne of God, from Illustrations of the Book of Job, 1825 (published 1826). Engraving on India paper chine collé on wove paper. Jansma Collection, Grand Rapids Art Museum, 2014.1c. …f Job, acquired this year, the director of MOBiA, RICHARD P Townsend, said: “We are pleased to partner with the Grand Rapids Art Museum to share the collection, which underscores how biblical narratives have influenced artists over time, and is a perfect vehicle for showcasing the history of a creative technique, telling the story of the development of western printmaking from the Renaissance to the 20th century.” The story behind the Jansma family’s passion for biblically inspired art is as moving as the prints they have acquired. When Sidney Jansma Jr accepted a challenge to contribute to GRAM, he was merely taking another leap of faith in a life ruled by risk. A native of Grand Rapids and owner of Wolverine Gas and Oil Corporation, Jansma is a committed member of the Christian Reformed Church. Whether drilling for oil or funding a variety of Christian initiatives, he is known for acting from the heart and on gut instinct. The first in his immediate family to achieve a c…
Portrait, VS Gaitonde. Photograph: Shalini Saran. …by citing a specialist in South Asian art, critic RICHARD Bartholomew, who maintained that traditional Indian miniatures were not purely figurative, but were composed of literary and abstract elements.4 Gaitonde then might have been alluding to our necessity to “see” something in the picture, even when there is nothing objective or graphic there because, intuitively, we attempt to make sense out of unfamiliar patterns trying to connect them with what we already know. Gaitonde was influenced by abstraction as a theory and as practice; he was familiar with Kandinsky’s treatise, Über das Geistige in der Kunst, and followed Zen Buddhism in his religious practice. From Kandinsky, the painter learned to think about art in synaesthetic terms, as a form of expression that could be brought close to music by turning away from the objective world. From Zen Buddhism, Gaitonde obtained a meditative disposition, which allowed him to consider painting as a way of induction to silence of sorts…
Elaine Cameron-Weir. Found that the effect of manures, drugs, and poisons could be determined within minutes, providing plant control with a new precision. He repeated his tests on metals, administering poisons to tin, zinc, platinum, and obtained
astonishing response which, when plotted on a graph, appeared precisely like those of poisoned, 2015. Brass, alabaster.
Stone dimensions 31.8 x 31.8 x 27.9 cm, overall height 231.1 cm, others variable. © the artist; Courtesy Lisson Gallery, London. …enry Longly, Beatriz Olabarrieta, Ben Schumacher, RICHARD Sides, Cally Spooner, Alice Theobald and the art collective Am Nuden Da. The curators present new material from each artist in a fresh and engaging show. Noorali and Talbot say: “Each of these artists demonstrates one, or at times all, of the three key themes within the show – collaboration, the use of language as artist material, and an inquiry into the nature of creative labour.” The use of language as artist material is framed by a selection of works that take a linguistic turn. For the Danish-born artist and writer Thomsen, who now lives and works in London, the written language is a springboard for the series of paintings, The boys the girls and the political. “Thomsen describes in text a lived event as a stream-of-consciousness performative act, the written material generated becomes documentation of an experience much like a photograph,” say the curators. The act of writing is transformed into seven pieces, mod…
35. Alan Robb
Alan Robb. Brazil, The Taste of Blood, 2005-8. Oil on linen, 168 x 182 cm. …rospective exhibitions that were important to me: RICHARD Hamilton, Edwardo Palozzi, Edward Burra at the Tate, Lucian Freud and Michael Sandle at the Hayward. It was David Hockney’s show at the Whitechapel that caused me to trade painting in oils for acrylic. The colours were so fresh, the images so clear and surfaces so free of handling. Peter Blake and Jan Haworth accompanied a student bus trip to Bristol to see Peter’s first major solo exhibition at the Arnolfini. I was at the private view of Pop Art Redefined, curated and published by John Russell and Susie Gablic at the Hayward, which pointed up the differences between London and New York pop and explored the wider context. It was in this show that I first saw the work of Oyvind Fahlstrom, which opened another door. JMcK: What influenced the bronze sculpture, Corrie (1998)? AR: Its original purpose was as a model as reference for paintings. (I had used geographical block diagrams as a fresh approach to landscape painting.)…
Maria Sibylla Merian, drawing of a Surinam caiman fighting a South 
              American false coral snake. Surinam or Amsterdam, about AD 1699-1705. 
              30.6 x 45.4 cm © British Museum<br>
              <br>
            …ding is appropriately described by RICHARD Westmacott (who executed the sculptured figures, 1851) entitled The Progress of Civilisation. Sir Henry Ellis, Principal Librarian of the British Museum (1827-1856) later expanded the artist's words: …Man is represented as emerging from a nude savage state, through the influence of religion. He is next personified as a hunter and tiller of the earth…Patriarchal simplicity then becomes invaded and the worship of the true God defiled…Paganism prevails and becomes diffused by means of the Arts.8 What seems critical about this exhibition is the manner and method by which it brings the Enlightenment into focus as a generic force and influence which has itself conditioned the subsequent development …
Anselm Kiefer. Nothung, 1973 (detail). Photograph: © Studio International. …articular, whose epic Parzival was popularised by RICHARD Wagner (1813-83), who loosely based his opera Parsifal on it, is referenced readily with images of snow and ice stained red with blood and the use of the name Herzeleide, or “heart’s sorrow”, who was Parzival’s mother. The snowscapes also refer to the blanket of snow – or collective lack of conscience and silence – which Kiefer believes to have fallen over postwar Germany. And the use of traditional German epics – as well as of art itself – is a brave act of reclamation of things that the Nazis had taken for themselves and sullied. In the heart of the galleries, Kiefer has built a site-specific installation, Ages of the World (Die Erdzeitalter), which he worked on here at the Royal Academy. Kiefer studied law because he wanted to understand the rules underpinning why we are who we are. This question runs through much of his work and, as well as being deconstructed pictorially with his thick strokes and ruined b…
Jimmy Liao. Kiss & Goodbye, 2015 (exterior view). Mixed media. … Different from land art such as that produced by RICHARD Long, the works in Echigo-Tsumari are more like artists’ attempts to unearth the history of the region and the memory of the locals. Many artists have taken on the theme of local culture, interpreting it in their own way. Beside Doichi local train station, on the Iiyama line, is Kiss & Goodbye (2015), a train compartment-like installation that visitors can enter, by Taiwanese picture-book illustrator Jimmy Liao. Initially, Liao wrote and illustrated a picture book that told the tale of a boy who lost his parents in the devastating earthquake that hit northern Japan in 2011 and travels to live with his grandfather in Echigo-Tsumari. With this installation, Liao has brought his colourful tale to life. Entering the compartment, which is made to look like a train in a tunnel, visitors come across “the boy” kneeling on the front seats of the train, watching the scenery from the window, as he travels to his grandfather’s.…
…e commentator claims, the world of RICHARD Kelly's film 'Donnie Darko'?) are moving effects of a war drift – profoundly distressing. …
Larry Bell. 6 x 6 An Improvisation, 1989-2014. Clear glass, gray glass, and glass coated with Inconel (Nickel/chrome alloy). Forty panels, each: 72 x 72 x 1/2 in (182.9 x 182.9 x 1.3 cm). …et him! He came to my studio with Bill Copley and RICHARD Hamilton. AG: Not a bad crowd … LB:  Yeah, I didn’t know who it was at first. I was 22 years old or so when they came by. I suffer from something called hereditary nerve degeneration and was told that I was born with a 40% loss across the spectrum in both ears. But my hearing loss was not diagnosed until I was 46, so I couldn’t really hear too well. When I was introduced to Duchamp I couldn’t quite make out who he was at first. But when I eventually realised, I was catatonic. He was a really nice guy. When I did my first show, he invited me to his house for tea. There were beautiful Giorgio de Chirico paintings on the wall. It was amazing to be surround by his cronies. AG: What did you talk about? LB: I asked him if he was still working and he said: “Yes, I’m preparing a show right now of earlier work.” I then asked when he had done them? To which he replied: “Oh, when I was six or seven …” • Larr…
Christopher Williams. Best.Nr.: 68011, Best.Nr.: 28856, Best.Nr.: 28856. Brushed aluminium – dishwasher safe sauce pan and stew pot. Studio Rhein Verlag, Düsseldorf. 26 January 2017. Inkjet print, 73.7 x 92.2 cm paper. Courtesy the artist, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne and David Zwirner, New York / London / Hong Kong. © the artist. …on – such as John Baldessari, Cindy Sherman and RICHARD Prince – so influential during Williams’s education in the latter half of that decade, returned to the referential image to simultaneously stress its significance and inflate it. Sherman’s film stills and Prince’s cowboys showed photography as flat, and whatever reality it indexed as fundamentally fugitive. After conceptual art, is all art conceptual? Are all images about images? [image5] Upstairs, we have become used to the walls; we speak their language of oversized yet empty presence. And as adjectives invigorate nouns, photographs now activate the thus-far dormant utility of another four of the dog-eared blocks. Two pictures, one of apples and one of steel pots, like those found in an Ikea catalogue or on supermarket signposting, are saturated to an almost fetishistic intensity, but stop just short of meaning in a breathtaking encounter with objectivity and pictorial precision. A little girl caught in a fantastic g…
Ruth Asawa (American, 1926‒2013). Untitled (S.540, Hanging, Seven-Lobed, Interlocking Continuous Form within a Form), c1958. Brass and copper wire. The Shidler Family Collection. Artwork © Estate of Ruth Asawa. … two artists who are not quite as often included: RICHARD Pousette-Dart and Mark Tobey, both represented by strong works. Savage Rose (1951) is a roughly textured, saturated, colour-rich painting of insistently repeating bands by Pousette-Dart, who has attracted renewed interest lately. And from the museum’s holdings come two finely grained, “white writing”, monochrome drawings and a drawing of a faceted, vertical object that suggests coloured glass by Tobey, who was smitten by Asian aesthetics and philosophies, and is also the focus of renewed appreciation. One standout from the Asian-American side is an exquisite, multi-lobed, woven mesh wire hanging sculpture from c1958 by Ruth Asawa, one of only three women in the show. (The role of women and women of colour is another long-overdue chapter in the abstract expressionist narrative that is currently being reexamined and expanded). Asawa, too, is beginning to receive her due after decades of neglect. Her recent, critically accla…
Jeff Koons. Titi, 2004-2009. Mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent colour coating, 37 7/8 x 23 13/16 x 14 7/8 in (96.2 x 60.5 x 37.8 cm). © Jeff Koons. …ought the advice of Nobel prize-winning physicist RICHARD P Feynman, who developed a liquid solution of sodium and water that would float a basketball centrally in a tank. The piece requires a climate-controlled environment and must be continually adjusted to assure equilibrium is maintained. Infamous heavy-hitters from the Popeye and Celebration series show the high point of Koons’s obsession with surface, where materials and techniques were used to scientific degrees of precision to create readymades that were actually illusions. The aluminium inflatables are flawless; part of the Popeye series, Acrobat (2003-9), a lobster balancing on an upturned bin and the back of a chair, looks as light as a blow-up toy. Money, effort and lengthy amounts of time have been required for works in the Popeye and Celebration series in order to create the appearance of a real readymade. Play-Doh (1994-2014), from the Celebration series, is not only impressive in scale, but also in technique. Ko…
Cauleen Smith. In the Wake, 2017. Satin, poly-satin, quilted pleather, upholstery, wool felt, wool velvet, indigo-dyed silk-rayon velvet, indigo-dyed silk satin, embroidery floss, metallic thread, acrylic fabric paint, acrylic hair beads, acrylic barrettes, satin cord, polyester fringe, poly-silk tassels, plastic-coated paper, and sequins. Collection of the artist. Photograph: Miguel Benavides. …eo, Frank Stella); and floor-width installations (RICHARD Serra, Judy Chicago) constructed from fabricated and found elements. Such work was, and still is, selected for the clarity and strength of its subject (statement) and how well it is made (technique). Even as evolving ways of seeing – cubism, abstract expressionism, op art, pop art – pushed the dialogue into new territory, the field remained visual and the work spatially contained, presenting the visitor with a fairly clear idea of what constitutes art with a capital A. Asking what art is now tracked a different model, as a combination of factors – Vietnam, economic equality, racial tensions, immigration and fast-moving technology – broke through the paradigm, opening subject and medium to free associate among concepts and tools that propelled virtually every idea of what we held to be art to an ever-morphing place that braves close definition. To the consternation of the classicist, art today is understo…
Anna Berger. Off Piste, 2016. Oil on aluminium, 70 x 60 cm. Courtesy of Kevin Kavanagh Gallery. …ion, which is also rife in contemporary art, with RICHARD Prince and Jeff Koons leading the pack. German artist Vivian Greven (b1985) paints directly from images of Bernini’s iconic 17th-century marble sculpture The Ecstasy of Mother Theresa – her smooth pearly face appears almost to effervesce in the three paintings in the exhibition. Through repetition, colour and a square canvas, Greven creates a modern icon, similarly to how Andy Warhol depicted his celebrity subjects. Mixing religious iconography with the language of contemporary celebrity speaks of our time. “Each representation of her appears equally as aloof to the next,” writes Kealy in his text. The other “figurative” painter in the exhibition is the Czech painter Daniel Pitin (b1977), who, inspired by theatre sets, films and architecture, works from his imagination, building scenes of abstract props with actors who perform on his canvas. Painting in dark earthy colours, he brings a melanch…
Mark Rothko. <em>Black on Maroon, Sketch for "Mural No.6", </em>1958. Mixed media on canvas, 266.7 x 381.2 cm. Tate. Presented by the artist through the American Federation of Arts 1968 © 1998 by Kate Rothko Prizel and Christopher Rothko …empirical propositioning. He gives the example of RICHARD Serra in that sculptor's denial that his work is art and his belief that 'arthood' is reached empirically. An object is only art when placed in the context of art. Kosuth claims that, '... art's ability to exist will depend not only on its not performing a service - as entertainment, visual (or other) experience or decoration - ... but, rather, it will remain viable by not assuming a philosophical stance; for in art's unique character is the capacity to remain aloof from philosophical judgments'. Kosuth says that, 'In this period of man, after philosophy and religion, art may possibly be one endeavour that fulfils what another age might have called "man's spiritual needs". Or, another way of putting it might be that art deals analogously with the state of things "beyond physics" where philosophy itself always had to make assertions ... Art is the definition of art'.4 It is this special quality of Rothko's later wor…
My Dear BB … The Letters of Bernard Berenson and Kenneth Clark, 1925-1959. … Hugh Trevor-Roper to Bernard Berenson, edited by RICHARD Davenport-Hines, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2006, page xxviii. 5. Ibid, page xxv. 6. In addition to Cohen’s biography, other studies include Ernest Samuels’ meticulously researched biographies Bernard Berenson: The Making of a Connoisseur, 1979 and Bernard Berenson: The Making of a Legend, 1987, as well as Colin Simpson’s character assassination Artful Partners: Bernard Berenson and Joseph Duveen, 1987. 7. How to milk a millionaire by John Updike, The New York Times, 29 March 1987. 8. Cited in Behrman, page 149. 9. Rumor and Reflection by Bernard Berenson, Simon & Schuster, 1952, page 245. 10. On Clark’s relationship with the work of German art historians, see Breaking the shell of the humanist egg: Kenneth Clark’s University of London lectures on German Art Historians by Matthew C Potter, Journal of Art Historiography, Volume 11, December 2014. 11. Isaiah Berlin and Meyer Schapiro: An Exchange, The Brooklyn Rail…
Fiona Banner: Harrier and Jaguar, installation view, Tate Britain Duveens Commission 2010, London. …to be easy with the mega-scale. Like the sculptor RICHARD Serra he employed scale in order to enwrap the viewer in a total visual environment. Later, in 1997, at the Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin, he was to install a painting, The Swimmer in the Econo-mist (1997-98), which surrounded bemused viewers with a spin-cycle of diffused art-historical references which appropriated new quotations both from Picasso’s Guernica but also from his own original F111. Now in Tate Britain’s Duveen Gallery, happily cleared of all arredamente to reveal its own classical purity of form, Fiona Banner presents a complete reversal of that earlier Rosenquist idea of the surrounding space, the object-viewer in a vacuum, within a worked-over, definitive volume. She matches this humanist yet plutocratically-scaled environment of Duveen with two manifestations of technological near-obsolescence, relics of late 20th century aeronautics. These two objects are treated in the way that human beings have a…
Susan Aldworth. Reassembling the Self 3, 2012. Lithograph made at the Curwen Studio, 85 x 65 cm, lithograph made at the Curwen Studio 2012. Image courtesy of the artist and GV Art. …be sure whether any memory is really our own. Dr RICHARD Wingate in his catalogue text for this exhibition outlines the development of imagery in biomedical research: “…Technological interventions … have altered the material stuff of biomedicine and human anatomy, from the slab of dissected material and collection of glass slides, to a three dimensional, digital theatre of the spectacular….” That medical and artistic images have been affected by our technological revolution concerns not only the aesthetics of the imagery but significantly the places we can now see into. “…visualisation techniques … have harnessed optical physics to give a dramatic window into living cells and the functioning system….” In the light of these changesWingate asks: “… what effect does the mechanics and aesthetic of visualisation have on our sense of our own biology?” Influenced by our technological and image-filled environment we are, in general, familiar with visualisations of t…
Rupert Shrive, Paris, 2011. Photograph by Alberto Ricci. Courtesy Yale University Press. …ludes devoted to three architects (Norman Foster, RICHARD Meier and Oscar Niemeyer) and three photographers (Brassaï, Henri Cartier-Bresson and Hans Namuth). There is symmetry and elegance in Peppiatt’s Old World, leisurely style. In fact, the best way to approach this book is with an equally leisurely, meandering pace; dipping in and out guided by instinct and whim and stopping along the way to savour the insights, humour and camaraderie revealed in its pages. Peppiatt admits that his collection is “a kind of weird, patchy but exalting autobiography”.2 Perhaps, but in its best moments, Interviews with Artists succeeds as a guide to the interview as an art in itself. Some entries are typical Q&A format, while others are distillations, where Peppiatt’s engaging commentary serves as glue for choice quotations from his sometimes willing, sometimes stingy sparring partners. For Peppiatt, the interview is a game where roles might be obscure and often reverse without warning. A…


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