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Martin Clark, Beatrice Gibson, Mark Fell and Steven Claydon. Art Sheffield, 2016. Photographs: Martin Kennedy. …rom Hannah Sawtell, Steven Claydon, Mark Fell and RICHARD Sides.   As with every biennial, the idea is not just to reflect aspects of the local and parochial, but to amplify the host city’s presence on the global art stage. And the work is a mixture of the specific and the universal, the local and the international. At polar extremes, in this respect, are the works by Mark Fell and Beatrice Gibson. Mark Fell’s Structural Solutions to the Question of Being is being exhibited at The Link pub on the Park Hill housing estate. Fell, who describes himself as a “Rotherham-based music producer and artist”, brings a wealth of local knowledge to this site-specific installation: a loving recreation, in a derelict brutalist housing estate pub, of the heady days of the 1980s and 90s underground music scene, as well as a far from rose-tinted recollection of the politics of the day. Among the dangling, cheap chandeliers, the ruined wallpaper and flashing blue and red disco lights, Fe…
Matteo di Giovanni. <em>Virgin Annunciate</em>, 1474. © 2007 Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design. Gift of Robert Lehman (57.301). Photo: Erik Gould …al Gallery mounted a superb exhibition curated by RICHARD Morphet and under the aegis of Neil MacGregor entitled 'Encounters: New Art from Old', in which leading contemporary artists were invited to select a preferred historic work from the collection, and produce work of their own inspired by this. Notably, Sir Anthony Caro chose a single panel from Duccio's 'Maesta' entitled 'The Annunciation' (1311). (This and two other panels from the Maesta remain, as here, in the National Gallery's collection.) Caro's several 'Variations' on Duccio's work captured that exercise in spatial architectonics brilliantly, exploring the interplay between container and contained. Caro's 'Variations' are not a grand symphony; rather they express the spirit of Duccio in what is more of a chamber music suite. Furthermore, Duccio's work has encouraged Caro to explore the frontality of his sculpture as a direct reaction, a direction which continues. The lesson of the current exhibition is, how…
Martin Clark, curator, Art Sheffield 2016, talking to Studio International. Photograph: Martin Kennedy. …rom Hannah Sawtell, Steven Claydon, Mark Fell and RICHARD Sides. Art Sheffield 201616 April – 8 May 2016 Interview by VERONICA SIMPSONFilmed by MARTIN KENNEDY…
Renate Bertlmann talking to Studio International at the opening of Discordo Ergo Sum, Pavilion of Austria, Giardini, Venice, 2019. Photo: Martin Kennedy. … the State Gallery of Lower Austria in Krems. The RICHARD Saltoun Gallery has recently reissued her Tender Object photographs, showing inflated condoms paired in positions of seeming intimacy with each other, their surfaces glossy and lubricated, their colours DayGlo. [image10] Bertlmann first came to art-world attention in the 70s with a radical feminist practice, incorporating gendered objets trouvés into her sculptures, photography and performance. Fetish objects, typically associated with male fantasies (dildos, blow-up dolls) were deployed with wit and sensuality. She has said: “My works are an expression of fear combined with great lust, and the latter is frightening for those who don’t care to confront their own hidden desires.” These sentiments have renewed traction thanks to the #MeToo and gender equality movements. [image9] For the Venice Biennale, Bertlmann chose a dual presentation of works old and new. Inside the horseshoe-shaped structure of the Austrian pavili…
Bolivia, Paraguay and Argentina, Gemini 9, 5 June 1966, Large format vintage chromogenic print, on ‘A Kodak Paper’, 28.2 x 35.7 cm, NASA negative number S66-38317, Title and technical details in ink on verso. Courtesy Breese Little. …at was doubted for a while, but not forgotten. As RICHARD Branson prepares to send people into space commercially, that dream, and the aesthetics and styles along with it, could perhaps be within sight once more. The photographs, then, are nostalgic, as well as capturing the vision of a new future – both an old vision (of the 1960s) and the latest version. As Fitzgerald writes, again in the brilliantly perceptive The Great Gatsby, that cycle of vision and failure is perhaps beyond time, for all its concern with it: “As I sat there, brooding on the old unknown world, I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.”5 If we are in love with …
Celia Scott. <i>MJ</i>, l996. Sitter: MJ Long. Bronze, 33 x 20 x 20 cm. © the artist. …n the second room are the two American architects RICHARD Meier and Michael Graves, mediated by contemporary “guru” and fellow architect Peter Eisenman, with two further talents either side of him. In the sanctuary of the patio are four key figures: Leon Krier (architect, called here “the Polemicist”) with Alan Colquhoun (architect and critic). Opposite are his former partner John Miller and architect Edward Jones. It was Leon Krier who started the whole sequence with a commission for his own head, now appropriately standing in the Prince of Wales’ garden at Highgrove. It would be wrong to suggest that Celia Scott pays no regard to the long precedent of the sculpted head. Her head of Alan Colquhoun as an obsessive intellectual was partly inspired by a bust of the Roman senator Seneca.1 One could suggest too that John Cheere’s 18th century bust of Cicero in plaster2 conveys the same quality of intellectual enquiry, of which Scott would have been at least aware. Unlike Rodin…
Portrait of Jeanne Masoero, June 2015. Photograph: Will Lodge. …s work as lyrical abstraction. And I think it was RICHARD Humphreys, in a talk he gave at Tate, who spoke of the influence of music on Hilton’s work. So I associate lyrical abstraction with music. With flowing lines and pastoral colours. With spontaneity and movement. JM: Talking about music, I went to a convent school and we were taught Gregorian chant. It is absolutely beautiful because it has these phrases and then these long silences between them. There’s this circular rhythm. SH: Now that could relate to your work. JM: Yes, and Guy Brett has written about this.3 The spaces and the silences. And a kind of austerity as well. AMc: And the idea of discipline. JM: Yes, I think my work is about trying to find structures, which, in a way, border on order, and border on disorder as well – a kind of contained chaos. SH: It must have been a very regular kind of education in a convent. JM: Well, yes, we learned Latin and Gregorian chant and not much else, really. No science w…
Tracey Emin. My Bed, 1998. Mattress, linens, pillows, rope, various memorabilia, 79 x 211 x 234. Saatchi Gallery, London. © The Artist …y, she has received her share of vitriol as well. RICHARD Dorment, critic of The Telegraph, described her Venice Biennale exhibition as the worst exhibition he had seen in 22 years. The Edinburgh retrospective is in fact disappointing, in spite of its importance. Emin is as much a writer as a visual artist: words feature prominently in much of her work. Her appliqué blankets, for example, are graphic banners - they hark back to the feminist revival and celebration of quilt making in the 1970s, as well as the political arena of protest marches, and grassroots participation. Slogans not poetry, placards not paintings, they also belong in the world of 'outsider art' as do her personal memoirs. Much of her work - where she employs a range of methods such as embroidery and etching, with a preoccupation with method, and which require skill - is rudimentary. Her embroideries are imperfect, like those of a young girl, large samplers in which to learn the different stitches. In Emin's life, l…
Dieter Rams, Design Museum. Photo: Luke Hayes. …009–7 March 2010 by RICHARD CARR The exhibition, Less and More - The Design Ethos of Dieter Rams, at the Design Museum in London is the first to present a definitive exposition of the career of Dieter Rams in the UK for more than 12 years. But Less and More could also have been called “How Braun regenerated the Modern Movement in Germany after the Second World War”. For, following the death in 1951 of W. Max Braun, who founded the company in Frankfurt in 1921, his two sons, Artur and Irwin, abandoned the radios with their mahogany cabinets and decorative flourishes and, instead, adopted a radically new design philosophy that was carried through to every aspect of the company’s activities – from its products to its graphics, advertising and exhibition design. This philosophy was generated with the help of Otl Aicher, who was a founding member of…
Michael Andrews. Lights VII: A Shadow, 1974. Acrylic on canvas, 182.9 x 182.9 cm (72 × 72 in). © The Estate of Michael Andrews, courtesy James Hyman Gallery, London. …spective. Curated by public-to-commercial migrant RICHARD Calvocoressi – who during Andrews’s life organised two of his solo shows – it continues Gagosian’s trend of tiptoeing into territory more usually occupied by state-subsidised museums. Earth Air Water even contains work loaned by the Tate collection, a sort of reversion of the museum sector’s regular borrowing from private owners. As potentially troublesome as this private incursion into public territory may be, from the perspective of the gallery-goer there is no doubt that this is a munificent trend. Earth Air Water is a diligently arranged survey of Andrews’ career. Four substantial rooms guide the viewer through the painter’s large-scale works, arranged by elemental theme and series; a connecting space and the lobby captures his earlier portraiture and party scenes; and the gallery’s offices provide a photographic window into his studio and circle. In each section, we thus enco…
Vincent van Gogh, Path in the Garden of the Asylum, 1889. Oil paint on canvas, 61.4 x 50.4 cm. Collection Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo. …: George Henry Boughton, John Everett Millais and RICHARD Parkes Bonington. When he became a lay preacher, after being an art dealer and a teacher, he based his first sermon on Boughton’s God Speed! Pilgrims Setting Out for Canterbury (1874). Van Gogh admired the bleakly beautiful landscape Chill October by Millais in his letters. He owned the lithograph A Road by Jules Laurens, after Bonington’s A Distant View of St-Omer (c1824), and kept the print until the end of his life. In a letter to his brother Theo, he said A Road reminded him of a landscape in George Eliot’s Adam Bede, which he read in 1875. With a horizon dotted with people and a great expanse of sky, A Distant View of St-Omer appears next to his Bleachery at Scheveningen (1882). A wall text reads: “Van Gogh was moved by the suggestion of a human story in Bonington’s road through a landscape.” In the insightful catalogue, the lead curator, Carol Jacobi, writes: “Most importantly, British culture informed Van G…
Michael Wang, The Drowned World, 2018. Environmental installation. Photograph: Wolfgang Träger. Courtesy of Manifesta 12, Palermo. …Palazzo Ajutamicristo, Dutch information designer RICHARD Vijgen’s Connected by Air (2018) tracks all the “flows” travelling over Palermo’s sky, including winds, satellites and wireless signals; the result provides an eye-opening window into an omnipresent but largely invisible domain. [image2] Cuban artist Tania Bruguera’s mixed media work Article 11 (2018) gathers videos, news reports, texts and satirical sketches pertaining to the protest movement around a US military global communications system housed in the Sicilian town of Niscemi, which locals claim damages human health and the surrounding ecology. As with Vijgen, Bruguera homes in on the transmission of information, in this case with the way stories can be downplayed or suppressed by the will of the press. Though her documentation, as well as a wall mural, Bruguera grants a warm, sensitive embodiment to the campaigners – something that the US film-maker Laura Poitras’s videos on the same subject elsewhere in th…
Mark Wallinger talking to Studio International at the Jerwood Gallery in Hastings, 2018. Photograph: Tom Hastings. … his composition on to Wayne to choreograph from. RICHARD Serra’s Verblist (1967-68) and Muybridge’s grid were the two starting points. It interested me that Mark could choose specific action verbs, and then Wayne could work from there. At the same time as Undance, I was working on a show at the Kunstnernes Hus in Oslo in 2010. I had a UN sign pasted outside the building. It kind of struck me that, when you see a UN sign somewhere in the world … TH: … that it’s also a prefix. MW: Exactly, and it is very much about our efforts to undo something that has been done. So, that came into it as well. TH: Undance featured moving images of dancers projected on to the Muybridge grid. How did this work? MW: In a sense, there were two sets of choreography. There was the choreography of the different movements that we filmed, which were then back-projected, and then Wayne and I developed a response to these moving images. To begin with there was a simple repetition in real space of w…
Walker Evans. <i>Subway Portraits</i>, 1938-1941. Gelatin silver print, 12.4 x 18 cm (4 7/8 x 7 1/16 in). National Gallery of Art, Washington, John Wilmerding Fund. …Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, trans. RICHARD Howard (London: Vintage, 1993), pp. 20, 87. 7. Sontag, p. 55.…
Richard Dupont. Untitled (5), 2008. Pigmented cast-polyurethane resin. Courtesy of Cheryl Gold. Photograph: Richard Dupont. …ake the head-to-toe mutant likeness of the artist RICHARD Dupont. Rendered in resin with data scanned from his body and modelled through a digital program, it calls into question the very idea of self-portrait. Bearing no relationship to Rembrandt’s searing investigations into inner life, or to Van Gogh’s piercing gaze on to incipient madness, this smooth autobiomorph is self-image as product. Far from a brush laid on canvas or a hand-held chisel meeting marble, the fabrication processes producing these designated artworks involve digital milling, rapid prototyping, audience participation and rebooting. Even a “selfie” has more soul. Although you could argue that a Ghiberti or a Bernini set their hands only to figures already carved out by assistants, those entrusted with such work were artists in their own right, many accruing their own fame. These are early days, of course, as artists are still pushing the boundaries and learning to control a technology that can take off on …
Richard Brautigan. Poem: All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace, 1960s. Photograph: Veronica Simpson. …ative of this uneasy alliance than beatnik writer RICHARD Brautigan’s 1960s poem All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace. When Brautigan first handed out free copies of his poem on the streets of San Francisco, in 1967, the social, psychological and economic impact of technology on human life was envisaged as something very different from the multiplicity of invisible tentacles via which technology facilitates / invades our lives today. Back then, popular culture saw machines as, at best, robots taking on the tasks that we find boring or tiresome; or, at worst, megalomaniac monsters reducing us to a state of subservience. Appropriately enough, Brautigan’s poem kicks off proceedings, printed in vintage typewriter font and collaged together with Brautigan’s rudimentary drawings of animals and a newspaper clipping of a Manhattan highway choked with cars. It seems only right to reproduce this oddball genius’s poem in full. All Watched Over by Machines of Lovi…
Man Ray. <em>Cadeau,</em> 1921. Iron and nails. Tate. Presented by the Tate Collectors Forum 2002 © Man Ray Trust/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2008 … is interesting to trace: it is a replica made by RICHARD Hamilton for the last Duchamp retrospective at the Tate in 1966, with the lower glass panel broken and remade in 1985. The original was made between 1915-23, and incorporated imagery from older works and studies including Chocolate Grinder, No. 1 (1913) and Draft Pistons (1914). The gradual removal of the artist's hand from the work and an interest in the potential of glass as a material and medium mark other works in this room, including Man Ray's cliché verre pieces, made by scratching through an inkpainted plate laid over photosensitive paper to produce a lightbased etching. Another arresting work by Man Ray is the photograph Elevage de Poussière (Dust Breeding) (1920), which transformed the asyet unfinished lower half of Duchamp's Large Glass into a strange dustballed landscape, highlighting the American's mastery of photography as more than a method of recording his own and his friends' painting…
Stephan Bogner, Philipp Schmitt and Jonas Voigt. Raising Robotic Natives, 2016 © Jonas Voigt. …nch: displaying the Architecture of Radio app, by RICHARD Vijgen (2015), it reveals a 360-degree visualisation of the dense system of data cables, radio signals, cell towers and satellites that are present in the building. Klein says: “This is what we want people to realise: you are already in a robotic system at all times of the day.” While expertly conjuring past, present and possible future technological realities, the exhibition doesn’t address – though it is explored in two of the documentaries, a couple of exhibits, and in the excellent and comprehensive catalogue – the most worrying question of all: who is controlling all the data that is already being transmitted and harvested by the machinery we use and inhabit? And to what end? Klein summarises: “Behind the code there is the human. And behind the human is a corporation. Technology is always a mirror of society and always reflecting the ideology behind the technology.” • Hello, Robot will be at the MAK (the A…
Top left: Jeffrey Deitch – recreation of Florine Stettheimer Collapsed Time Salon show. Top right: Sadaharu Horio's Art Vending Machine. Bottom: Cerith Wyn Evans. ... later on they are in a garden..., 2007. Photographs. Jill Spalding. …s Fergus McCaffrey (contrasting Marcia Hafif with RICHARD Nonas) and Josh Lilley (showing Tom Anholt with Kathleen Ryan) paired the sexes without referencing gender. At Los Angeles’s Kayne Griffin Corcoran, two transcendent light pieces by James Turrell backed on to gorgeous minimalist works by the all-but-forgotten 60’s LA artist Mary Corse that reflected their powdered metals like stardust. Also riding the vigorous Los Angeles art moment were Mernet Larsen’s diminutive, but boldly architectural, watercolors (Various Small Fires), Nevine Mahmoud’s hand-carved erotic forms (M+B), Alexandra Noel’s disarmingly intimate painted panels (Bodega), Rosson Crow’s cactus paintings (Honor Fraser) and Andrea Bowers’ Badass Girls at kaufmann repetto. I noted a strong representation of works made solely of fabric, newly taken up by artists both for its adaptability and its pertinence. Whether layered (Abdoulaye Konaté’s dyed-cotton dream strips), stitched (Kiki Smith’s tapestry)…
Édouard Vuillard in his studio at 56 Rue des Batignolles, Paris, c1898. Private collection. … after Les Nabis disbanded. An essay by Professor RICHARD Brettell (University of Texas, Dallas) connects memory and symbolism in Vuillard’s paintings and Proust’s novels, demonstrating how, taken together, artist and author represented the soon-to-disappear cultured class in fin de siècle Paris in its most private moments.3 The not-to-be-missed Acoustiguide audio tour for the show includes comments from Marc Salz, son of Vuillard’s American dealer; Mrs. Claude (née Bloch) Dalsace, who Vuillard painted with her family; and Mrs. Martine Martin, daughter of Simone Kapferer (née Aron) of the Rothschild banking family. The influence of Vuillard’s Jewish patrons figures prominently in this show. They welcomed the painter, raised in a working-class Catholic family, into their fold. More importantly, they commissioned paintings, murals, and lithographs from him; paved the way for solo exhibitions; introduced him to other collectors; became his main subjects; and formed deep and l…
Robert Devereux at the opening of When the Heavens Meet the Earth at the Heong Gallery, Downing College, Cambridge, 24 February 2017. Photograph: Martin Kennedy. …aire, formerly a partner in the Virgin empire and RICHARD Branson’s brother-in-law, sold off two-thirds of his collection of postwar British art and used the £4 million proceeds to set up a charity supporting artists in Africa. The African Arts Trust, as it was named, supports grassroots organisations, which, in turn, support African artists with basic needs such as studios and residencies. The exhibition specifically seeks to include some lesser-known artists, but there are some established names as well, including El Anatsui, 2013 Turner Prize nominee Lynette Yiadom-Boakye and Ibrahim Mahama, who showed in Venice in 2015 and currently has an exhibition at White Cube Bermondsey, London. Another well-known name is the South African photographer Zanele Muholi, whose work with the LGBTQ community places her at continual risk in a censorious and critical society. Ranging across photography, painting, sculpture and film, the exhibition evidences the wealth of artistic creativ…
Andy Warhol. Vote McGovern, 1972. Colour screenprint. © 2016 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and DACS, London. …mous screenprint Vote McGovern (1972), which sees RICHARD Nixon dressed in pink, glowering up with demonic yellow eyes. Although this campaign poster didn’t succeed in preventing Nixon’s re-election, Warhol believed that the administration punished him [Warhol] for the insult by continuously scrutinising his tax records. Humour creeps in with the Guerrilla Girls, who astutely highlight the inequalities of the art world, inequalities we are still living with today. The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist (1988), a drily sarcastic lithographic list, includes, “Working without the pressure of success” and “Not having to undergo the embarrassment of being called a genius”. May Stevens pulls no punches either. Her screenprint Big Daddy With Hats (1971) presents us with a naked middle-aged man, a figure based on a photograph of her father, doughy, absurd, smug and patriotic. A bulldog sporting the stars and stripes sits on his lap, with its tongue lolling.…
Roy Lichtenstein  (1923-1997). <em>Femme au Chapeau</em>, 1962. Oil and Magna on canvas 68 x 56 in. (172.7 x 142.2 cm). Collection of Martin Z. Margulies. © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein …d with all the hoopla surrounding Picasso’s RICHARD J. Daley Center Monument in Chicago with a small soft cloth reconstruction of Picasso’s gigantic steel sculpture. Juxtaposing the 1960 "Painted Bronze" of two Ballantine Ale cans by Jasper Johns with Picasso’s odd painted sculpture "Absinthe Glass" (1914) does have its wry aesthetic point; but of all the artists in the show, Johns most disappoints. His addled, cliché-riddled autumnal "Seasons" (1985-1986) and other late paintings with their sometimes merely fleeting references to Picasso lack the brilliant, vibrant audacity of his now-classic studies of the residue of consumerism—his numbers, flags, maps, and targets. Just as the old Saturday Evening Post warned, "Pop art/ Op art/Soon will/Stop art," Picasso and America Art implies that Picasso’s influence, as well as twentieth-century American painting, died with Warhol and his fellow ironists. (Picasso’s death in 1973 provides a convenien…
Graceland, Memphis<br>
      …as, price $24.95 ISBN 0-7006-0948-2. RICHARD Carr …
Versace Spring/Summer 1994. Ballgown. Pale gray silk and metal georget. …sace had begun work with the fashion photographer RICHARD Avedon. This was the beginning of a long line of fashion campaigns by Mr Avedon. 1982 was a major year for Gianni Versace that began with the launch of his innovative 'Oroton' in his collection at the Paris Opera. This metal mesh that Versace invented contradicted all of the usual properties of metal. It could be used to make delicate, shimmering evening dresses for women. It was also possible to colour and pattern the revolutionary material, as Versace often did. It could be used alone, or mixed with a variation of fabrics and patterns. Unlikely combinations included Oroton with lace, chiffon, animal skin and lace. The designer used Oroton to make slinky, figure-hugging garments that would usually require the finest silks and most delicate chiffon. Although his revolutionary fashion design was at first criticised by the Parisian Haute Couture scene, fashion's fickle nature was soon shown when Versace's fame and recognition esc…


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