logo studio international
Search
 
Results
Total: 376 results found.
Filfla Chapel, Malta. Architect: Richard EnglandRICHARD England (architect): Architect as Artist Auberge D'Italie, Valetta, Malta, 1-25 July 2008 Patrick Fenech (photographer): The New Eye of Osiris Auberge D'Italie, Valetta, Malta, 1-17 July 2008 RICHARD England, now seventy years of age, is a totally indigenous Maltese architect of international renown. He has in fact carried lightly, the task of taking the burden of history on his shoulders. Through July there was shown an exhibition of his work - an exhibition that he shared with photographer Patrick J Fenech - at the Auberge d'Italie in Valletta, Malta, as part of the Malta Arts Festival. A sumptuous volume of memento drawings and texts has been produced (not by England) including a rich selection of personal tributes to him, sent by leading architects such as Norman Foster, Emilio Ambasz, Mario Botta, Edward Cullinan, Massimiliano Fuksas, Hans Hollein, Juhani Pallasmaa, Cesar Pelli, Antoine Predock and artists such as John David Mooney from Chicago, …
Richard Tuttle, Separation, Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London, 5 - 27 June 2015, exhibition view.RICHARD Tuttle’s third solo exhibition with Modern Art shows four new bodies of work that continue his exploration of the properties of humble, everyday materials such as paper, cloth, wood and wire Modern Art, London 5-27 June 2015 by HARRIET THORPE For his third exhibition at Modern Art, the US artist RICHARD Tuttle (b1941) presents four different groups of work that were created at different times and in different locations. Using a selection of core objects, and miscellaneous ones, he has created wall- and floor-based sculptural assemblages that all vary in their spatial relationships, densities and surface areas. Two of these groups of work are titled Separation (Group 3) and Separation (Group 4). The works in the exhibition are constructed using the same palette of materials that Tuttle has used in the past, including paper, cloth, wood and wire. These simple materials investigate the contradictions between line and volume that he investigated in early works such as his P…
Richard Hamilton. Bathroom - fig.2 II, 2005-06. Oil on Fuji/Oce LightJet on canvas, 100 x 100 cm. © Courtesy of the Estate of Richard Hamilton. … Just what is it that makes RICHARD Hamilton’s works so different, so appealing? Sadly, the current exhibition of late works by Hamilton (1922-2011), at the National Gallery, doesn’t really do justice to his prolific and multifarious oeuvre, but, luckily, a major retrospective of his work is due to tour Europe and America from 2014. The National Gallery, London10 October 2012–12 January 2013 by ANNA McNAY Nevertheless, it seems appropriate that the National Gallery should host this small-scale show, since it has long been a place of significance to the artist, who sadly died during the preparations for what might be seen now as a touching tribute. Hamilton regularly appropriates or quotes directly from others’ art.  Alongside his allusions to Old Master paintings, he has long championed the works of Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) (who later became a friend, and for whom he organised the first major European retrospective, The Almost Complete Works of Marcel Duchamp, at th…
Calum Colvin. Studio installation. …ng of a Wunderkammer display cabinet by architect RICHARD Murphy has enabled the rich contents of the Academy’s library to be viewed. The digitalised books (where it is possible to turn the pages) are integrated seamlessly with objets d’art. An elaborate ram’s head next to a digital piece might have been incongruous, but it is beautifully presented as a cabinet of curiosities. AW: RICHARD Murphy’s design gave us the means of displaying items that were perhaps never expected to be viewed by the public. It’s challenging for the rare books to be exhibited outside the library. And that is based on the reader or artist knowing what it is they want to look at or study. All that material stays under the surface, whether it’s sculptural maquettes, institutional ephemera or books open within glazed drawers that can then be examined on the page-turner screen. Museums Galleries Scotland’s very generous funding of the exhibition enabled us to digitise the entire library catalogue. …
David Hockney. Artist and Model, 1973-74. Etching, 29 1/2 x 22 1/2 in, Edition: 100. © David Hockney. …oem A Supermarket in California.1 As the curator RICHARD Lloyd, our guide through the Hockney, Printmaker show, explains, Hockney is “continually quoting from other artists, there’s a dialogue going on – a wonderful energy”.2 Lloyd’s passion for Hockney’s work began in 1989 when, as an auction house picture porter, he came across Myself and My Heroes, showing Hockney’s spectacled self facing the haloed Whitman and Gandhi. With scribbles and text unceremoniously scratched over the composition, this image – among what was then known at the auction house where Lloyd worked as “School of modern British Dull” – must have leapt out of the grey landscape like a neon sign. “I can still remember the shock,” Lloyd recalls.3 A freshness of eye is spread throughout this exhibition, the process of seeing being one of Hockney’s primary passions. This fascination, together with a gleeful appetite for exploring all visualising and printmaking tools and technologies – fr…
Günter Brus. Kopfbemalung, Aktion, Wien, 1964. Vintage black and white photograph, 24 x 17.5 cm.RICHARD Saltoun, London 7 March – 4 April 2014 Austin/Desmond Fine Art 6 March – 4 April 2014 by ANNA McNAY Suggestive, affective, nauseating. How to respond but with a wince, looking quickly away, perhaps a shudder right through to your groin, and then looking back to check whether what you thought you saw, really was what you saw? In 1960s Vienna, four men began producing art like never before. Along with body art, performance art and Fluxus elsewhere, they sought to take painting away from the constraints of the canvas – to use the body as both brush and canvas, to test its limits, to use it as raw material, raw flesh, to be butchered and reconstituted in performances or aktions, a full-on rejection of object-based or commodifiable art forms. Their wilfully transgressive and violently sensational works, sometimes performed for an audience, at other times for the camera, are looked on today as a body of work labelled as Viennese Actionism, and this joint exposé by Richa…
…ded design can do all the work; and it vindicates RICHARD England's countervailing standpoint, emphasised by his output repeatedly in his career that an architect is an artist - if not, he is something other. RICHARD England, who is wholly Maltese in parentage despite his name and his architect father's own origins, has lived and worked in Malta most of his life. Except for a period as a student in the North Italian office of Gio Ponti. Perhaps his own architecture from the beginning has been a direct reaction to the perfectible formal language of Ponti - a reaction to the buildings, rather than the personality there. Mario Botta contributes a telling appreciation of the salient qualities of England's architecture, including of his 'grande abilita nell'uso delle differenti tecniche grafiche che spaziano dal sottile tratto filiforme a penna per i margini delle architetture alle forti e compatte stesure delle superfici opache per le ombre.' Botta is an architect of England's own mind.…
View of Gallery 1, courtesy of Gagosian Gallery. © Hélène Binet … and Serra, leave no doubt of the pre-eminence of RICHARD Serra. This article discusses previous works by Serra in the USA and Spain and considers why, for Serra, architects are a problem rather than a solution.   RICHARD Serra and Robert Smithson each famously tackled the notion of the Picturesque in landscape, and in widely divergent ways. The works displayed by Serra at this North London exhibition, in company with others by Alberto Giacometti, Lucio Fontana, and Cy Twombly, go some way to remind us of the seminal role which Serra himself has played in the development of sculpture since the 1960s. In fact, at this exhibition, entitled 'Living, Looking, Making', it seems that the exhibition revolves around RICHARD Serra's work: considerable intellectual force has been expended in assembling and setting out the works, and it is to good effect. Although Serra is pre-eminent, the works of the other artists are themselves enhanced in the process. Both Smithson and Serra had str…
Venice Biennale: the British five by David Thompson, Studio International, Vol 171, No 878, June 1966, page 232. © Studio International. … Cohens [Bernard Cohen, Harold Cohen], Denny, and RICHARD Smith seems suddenly to have aroused people’s interest [in the Venice Biennale]. Featured already in Vogue Magazine, (‘Merchants of Venice?’), trailed by B.B.C...” by David Thompson (This article was first published in Studio International, Vol 171, No 878, June 1966, pages 232-243.) British participation at Venice is not usually the subject of much comment at home, particularly before the event. But this year’s selection of Caro, the Cohens, Denny, and RICHARD Smith seems suddenly to have aroused people’s interest. Featured already in Vogue Magazine, (‘Merchants of Venice?’), trailed by B.B.C. cameras all the way from their studios to the Giardini Pubblici, the five artists have obviously been recognized, even beyond the specialized confines of the art world, as ambassadors of a new ‘image’ to this Biennale. Not since 1952, when the famous ‘manifestation’ at the British Pavilion put postwar British sc…
Richard Long: Time and Space, Arnolfini, Bristol, 31 July – 15 November 2015. Interview with Kate Brindley, Arnolfini Director. … Fifteen years after RICHARD Long’s last exhibition of any scale in his native Bristol, he is the Arnolfini’s showcase artist during the city’s 2015 European Green Capital celebrations. Director Kate Brindley speaks to Studio International about the exhibition “I am interested in the universals: stones, water, mud, hands, days, circles, symmetry, gravity, footpaths, and roads.”1 RICHARD Long was born and bred in Bristol and still lives in his native city, so it is not surprising that elements of the local landscape are integral to many of his works. For his exhibition at Arnolfini, which forms part of the city’s celebrations as 2015 European Green Capital, Long has selected some of his favourite photographs and text pieces, many of them with local flavour, from the last 50 years of his career. A number of key works have been recreated inside the gallery and one wall has been given over to a new painting, Muddy Water Falls (2015), using mud from the River Avon: the top …
Michael Spens, Fife, summer 2013. …n Edinburgh at the time, through involvement with RICHARD DEMARCO’s Gallery, the publisher Editions Alecto, and collecting modern art. In 1971, he commissioned a nine-panel ceiling (originally installed in Cleish Castle, Scotland, which Michael also restored) from Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, which was, with the support of the National Galleries of Scotland, increased to 12 panels and installed in the Dean Gallery, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art. He also served on the Committee of the National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh, and then on the Scottish Arts Council 1978-81. In the 70s, he had expanded into art and architectural publishing, with considerable success in both London and Berlin, with Studio International Publications Ltd, Architectural Press (1988-90), Academy Editions (1993-97) and Ernst & Sohn, Berlin (1997-98). In 1982, he became the editor of Studio International, collaborating with Arthur and Jill Sackler, who bought the magazine at that time, and Martin Kenne…
…isibly wilting from 'My Venice Biennale Hell' and RICHARD DEMARCO, totting up the names to drop, effusively yet somehow unchanged since 1982. All were flattered and relieved to surge across the red carpet into the consoling hospitality of the traditional Guggenheim party, where ghosts of the 1950s still linger among the dedicated graves of numerous canine pets and Peggy Guggenheim's own memorial. Surely this should have been the hour of the 'comedy terrorist' Aaron Barschak, but then he may not have been able to fulfil his ultimate engagement at Windsor Castle. And even Silvia Ziranek (who first worked with Bruce McLean in the 1970s) was not there to add more roses to the grave. Come back Silvia. Venice needs you. In Studio International, Summer 1984, Mario Amaya could say of the 41st Biennale, 'Cracks were noticeable this summer, lines under the eyes, double chins, much too overweight - late middle age spread has definitely set in'. Now in 2003, it is the wheelchair for a city descri…
Kate Downie. Photograph: Nick Howard. …e she lived for three years. In 2008, she won the RICHARD DEMARCO prize for Scottish Painting (2008). The work in the present exhibition is drawn from recent travels to Italy and Spain: she uses coastal landscapes to define self and humanity’s relationship to the wider world. Materials such as wax, plaster and gold paint are employed to heighten allusions of mortality found historically in art and literature in the sea. Although Winton chooses acrylic wash, the images in the exhibition at Cobalt Contemporary Arts Gallery are essentially drawn images; drawing provides a means of gathering information from the places she visits and expressing it with a sense of immediacy. Images of the coastal areas from Arbroath in the north-east of Scotland where she grew up, to Spain and Italy focus on the timeless nature of human existence. References to the sea, to voyages made are based in observation though essentially spiritual. “Shetland has such a rugged land and seascape and the elements…
Kurt Schwitters, German, 1887-1948. <em>Merz Pictures 32 A. The Cherry Picture</em> 1921. Cut-and-pasted colored and printed papers, cloth, wood, metal, cork, oil, pencil and ink on board, 91.8 x 70.5 cm. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Mr and Mrs A Atwater Kent, Jr. Fund, 1954
 © 2006 Kurt Schwitters/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn. …rk, from 18 June-11 September 2006. RICHARD DEMARCO
Richard Serra. <em>Fernando Pessoa</em>, 2007-8. Weatherproof steel, 118 1/8 x 354 1/2 x 8 inches (300 x 900.4 x 20.3 cm). © Richard Serra. Courtesy of Gagosian Gallery. Photo credit: Joshua White. … by MICHAEL SPENS RICHARD Serra’s 2008 Exhibition at Gagosian gallery, which closed just before Christmas, showed that the American sculptor was working at the height of his powers. A true colossus, both intellectually and materially, in both America and Europe, he brings dread to architects whose buildings are fortunate enough to receive his work for exhibition. At the Guggenheim Bilbao many who saw his work installed there recently felt that it markedly diminished the enfolding postmodern ‘baroque’ building which enclosed it, not just in scale adjustment, but also in intellectual and aesthetic terms, all due respect of course to the architect there, his fellow North American Frank Gehry. Latterly, in the last quarter of 2008, their young architect David Kohn was involved, on site, in raising the actual new-built height of the internal volume of the spacious new gallery off Kings Cross to match the size of Serra’s new pieces. Significantly, a 1200 square metre, 450mm deep…
Pulitzer Building: Pulitzer Arts Foundation. Photograph: Robert Pettus. …ican artists, Alexander Calder, Fred Sandback and RICHARD Tuttle Alexander Calder: Calder Lightness Fred Sandback: 64 Three-Part Pieces RICHARD Tuttle: Wire Pieces Pulitzer Arts Foundation, St Louis 1 May – 12 September 2015 by LILLY WEI There is now a sign of noticeable, if not flagrant, size outside the entrance to a building much admired for its precise measurements and interior, light-cradled serenity, anchored by two iconic works on permanent view, by Ellsworth Kelly and RICHARD Serra, one indoors and the other outdoors. (A Brancusi could be glimpsed through the glass window of an upstairs office.) The sign identifies the elegantly aloof building as a museum, and announces the three exhibitions currently on view – Alexander Calder (1898-1976), Fred Sandback (1943-2003) and RICHARD Tuttle (b 1941) – celebrating a re launch that is not only architectural, but also philosophical. In a more outgoing mode, the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, built in 2001 by Tadao Ando, the revered …
Marie Yates. Field Working Paper 9. – 18th June 1972 – Hillson's Ho, Harford Moor, Dartmoor, 1972. Copyright the artist. Courtesy Richard Saltoun Gallery. …as often been misinterpreted. A new exhibition at RICHARD Saltoun will hopefully reengage viewers in the relevant discourse by ANNA McNAY Marie Yates (b1940) graduated from Manchester Regional College of Art in 1959. After a period spent producing abstract paintings in St Ives, she returned to study fine art at Hornsey College of Art (1968-71). During this time, she was strongly influenced by the writings of Lucy Lippard and Yoko Ono and the beginnings of conceptual art. She began to produce her Field Workings – photographic and text works, documenting journeys or “procedures” in the countryside – and, in 1979, she made Image/woman/text (after Roland Barthes), exploring social preconceptions about photographic images of women, the way they are made, and their meanings. In June 1977, Fenella Crichton wrote in Studio International: “Marie Yates is a woman working with landscape. Radical ideas do not fit easily into this framework, because we are deeply ri…
Anish Kapoor. Untitled, 1987. Papier mâché and paint on paper, 45.5 x 61 x 4.5 cm (17 7/8 x 24 1/8 x 1 3/4 in). © Anish Kapoor. Courtesy the artist. Photograph: Sophie Baker. …0 February – 19 April 2014 Abstract Drawing by RICHARD Deacon. Published by Ridinghouse in association with Drawing Room, London 2014. by JANET MCKENZIE Sculptor RICHARD Deacon has selected works by more than 30 artists spanning the last 105 years to reveal how abstract drawing can be viewed and understood. He does not attempt a universal or exhaustive survey, but one that identifies the “various strands of abstract drawing – inscriptive, calligraphic, ornamental, generative, individuating and identifying”. Abstract Drawing coincides with a major retrospective exhibition of his work as a sculptor, at Tate Britain (5 February – 27 April 2014). There, his early drawing It’s Orpheus When There’s Singing ♯7  (1978-79), inspired by Rilke’s Sonnets to Orpheus, indicates his affinity with drawing; it is a structurally cohesive work made up of beautiful curved forms, that appears to achieve an airborne place. Numerous of his scultures could, in recent drawing researc…
Richard Hamilton, <em>The Apprentice Boy</em>, 1987. Dye transfer (ed. 12) 48.8 x 48.8 cm (image); 64 x 63 cm (sheet) © Richard Hamilton …rned cleverly into its seven rooms on two floors, RICHARD Hamilton's protest pictures have found a provocatively gentrified home, replete with the true spirit of the Enlightenment now in its bare but well-proportioned rooms. The exhibition reviews Hamilton's long-term engagement with the art of protest, and so with four decades in which he has turned his consummate artistic skill to the higher purpose of troubled times. In these 40 or so works, the curators have grouped them according to thematic headings, 'Swingeing London', 'Drop the Charges', 'Treatment Room', 'The Troubles', 'Finn MacCool', 'Kent State' and 'WMD'. RICHARD Hamilton (b. 1922) has been called the 'father of Pop' but would not himself lay claim to this primacy, any more than his friend, the late Eduardo Paolozzi (d. 2005). But together they formed the fulcrum of what became known as the Independent Group, a vital element in the development of British contemporary art away from the…
The Broad museum on Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles. Photograph: Benny Chan, courtesy of The Broad and DIller Scofidio + Renfro. …ng, Anselm Kiefer, Barbara Kruger, Koons, Ruscha, RICHARD Prince, Kusama, Fischl, Chuck Close, Christopher Wool, Glenn Ligon, El Anatsui. This said, when at the top of its game, the familiar can be thrilling; such are Johns’s Watchman, Lichtenstein’s I … I’m Sorry, Ruscha’s Norm’s, La Cienaga, on Fire, Kiefer’s Nuremberg, and certain sections of Murakami’s In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow. Even Koons’s Balloon Dog (Blue), become a decal on T-shirts and ties, instils joy. Points, too, for bold installations that speak to the moment; Robert Therrien’s monumental takes on mass-produced household furnishings, and Kara Walker’s graphic commentaries on the unacceptable and unspeakable. Speaking to the Broads’ predilections, the works in the inaugural show incorporate abstraction and flirt with the conceptual, but focus in on the day’s big social themes of consumerism, political struggle, self-identity and decadence. Reflecting their stated…
Antony Donaldson. ‘Round midnight, 2015. Acrylic on board, 53.5 x 53.5 cm (21 x 21 in). …de. Antony Donaldson: And [Eduardo] Paolozzi and RICHARD Hamilton. ARC: They were of a slightly earlier generation. AD: Yes, of course. But the so-called first generation at the Royal College, people like Dick Smith, Peter Blake, Joe Tilson, were gone by the time the people that I knew were students, Peter Phillips, Patrick Caulfield, Allen Jones. Actually, Allen Jones didn’t last very long at the Royal College either. They were studying at exactly my time, but at the RCA rather than the Slade. ARC: And arriving in London itself, which was the first of a series of journeys you made? Before we get to the 60s, how would you describe the prelude; what was it like before the transformation? AD: My childhood was basically fractured. My father was a fighter pilot who was killed in the war. He was missing presumed dead so my mother’s pension did not exist because it couldn’t be proved he had been killed. There was no money, so she had to get a job and I had a nanny who looked after…
Studio International, Vol 179, No 923, June 1970, page 247. … Cordeiro and Moscati seem to be interested, like RICHARD Hamilton, in what RICHARD Morphet describes as 'the knife-edge border between legibility and illegibility'.1 The possibilities of effecting this kind of modulation in films seem very hopeful. Cordeiro's and Moscati's series seems like so many stills from a film sequence, exploring, perhaps, an elusive human relationship without the need for actors. Computer-animated films are also an interesting and fairly virgin field, and moreover a sound economic proposition since they genuinely mechanize a tedious and expensive manual job. The same cannot be said of the computer program ART1 devised by Professors Katherine Nash and RICHARD H. Williams, of the universities of Minnesota and New Mexico respectively.2 The logic of this seems to be that the computer industry is emphasizing more and more the importance of programme 'packages' for various professionals, so that doctors, accountants, draughtsmen and others can use the computer effe…
Albert Houthuesen.<em> Duena and Dancer, </em>1947. Indian ink, 14 x 10 inches (35.5 x 25.4 cm). Copyright Albert Houthuesen Estate. … by RICHARD Nathanson The Putney Press, London, 2008 Reviewed by JANET McKENZIE The clown is a rich cultural symbol in Western art representing a plethora of ideas and identities. It has been used by the artist as a form of self-portraiture to allude to the role of art as critic, dissenter, outcast, wanderer and enchanter. Pierrot, the mute poet can be seen as a “victim of a social destiny he endure[s] with resignation”.1 “The modern ‘Harlequin’ can be traced back, through Old French to Hellequin, an evil flying demon with an animal’s face. According to the mysteries of medieval times, the role of Hellequin was to transgress social taboos”.2 He was unpredictable and dualistic, “agents of the passage from one world, or state, to another”.3 The clown is a metaphor for the condition of the modern artist with poignant images that make up a roll call of the most significant artists of the 19th and 20th century. With antecedents such as Antoine Watteau, Jean-Étienne Lio…
Richard Smith. Untitled, 2002. Oil on canvas, 263 x 218 cm. © Richard Smith Foundation, courtesy Flowers Gallery London and New York. … This is the first posthumous exhibition of RICHARD Smith, who died last year, and whose work straddled pop and abstract art Flowers Gallery, London 9 June – 15 July 2017 by SAM CORNISH RICHARD Smith died last year at the age of 84, during the run of an exhibition of his prints in his home town of Letchworth Garden City. Work of Five Decades at Flowers Gallery in Cork Street is the first posthumous London showing of the artist, who had been permanently resident in the United States since 1978. Early in his career, Smith appeared in the group exhibitions Place, 1959, and Situation, 1960, now considered important moments in the story of abstract art in Britain. His 1975 Tate retrospective reunited all the works included in five of his previous exhibitions, starting with his first solo exhibition, at the now celebrated Green Gallery in New York, and also including those with Kasmin in London and the Galleria dell’Ariete in Milan. The Tate show was badly received and, after the 70s…
Richard Long. <em>Installation photograph</em>, 2009. Copyright the artist. Photocredit: Tate Photography …n UK TV) and the gently caressing manner in which RICHARD Long’s works address the English landscape, and indeed the planetary land mass. He too denotes these in terms of stone circles, rocks, or pathways gently laid on the surface, always on the surface. How would Astronaut Long have visited the lunar surface? Far more gently than even gravity absence, allows. On earth, for Long, there is seldom any disruption by digging or excavation. Sometimes these impressions were even made by laying stones under water on a riverbed, as he has in the Little Pigeon River amidst the Great Smoky Mountains in Tennessee. The simple, pioneer namings of the landscape features of the mid-West suit Long’s poetic discourse rather better even than in England. The Three Day Triangular Walk between the Sources of the River Tamar (34 miles): from the source of the River Tamar to Exe Head (41 miles) and from Exe Head to East Dart Head (44 miles) in 1978, do seem needlessly complex and challenging but were th…


studio international logo
Copyright © 1893–2019 Studio International Foundation.

The title Studio International is the property of the
Studio International Foundation and, together with
the content, are bound by copyright. All rights reserved.
studio international cover 1894
Home About Studio
Archive Yearbooks
Interviews Contributors
Video Cybernetic Serendipity
CyberArt Contact us
twitter facebook RSS feed instagram

Studio International is published by:
the Studio International Foundation, PO Box 1545,
New York, NY 10021-0043, USA