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Aída Rubio González. Florence, 2013. Oil on canvas, 146 x 195 cm. Courtesy Rosenfeld Porcini. … will be (2013), based on the movie Donnie Darko (RICHARD Kelly, 2001), both the viewer and the man in the picture look down on a boxed scene, in a stance suggesting that of the director. The sole film work in the exhibition is Blessed are you who come by Fatma Bucak (born 1982). Rich in its possible interpretations, this enigmatic and atmospheric video, shot on the Turkish-Armenian border against the backdrop of the remains of an early 12th century church, shows a group of village men as they watch a woman dressed in black carry out a curious ritual. Shot almost entirely from a fixed frame, this contemporary piece echoes the structure and content of the Old Masters amidst which it is being shown, and is, on many levels, the least dynamic and offers the least interwoven narrative of them all. Bringing together these works, juxtaposing their styles and contents, and contrasting their moral lessons, as well as being a fascinating exercise in and of itself, also vehemently contradicts t…
Cybernetic Serendipity: the computer and the arts. Edited by Jasia Reichardt. Published by Studio International (special issue), 1968. …tists, architects, theorists and critics included RICHARD Hamilton, Reyner Banham, Eduardo Paolozzi, Peter and Alison Smithson and Theo Crosby. Inspired by Scientific American, Wiener’s writings, Claude Shannon’s information theory, John von Neumann’s game theory and D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson’s book On Growth and Form, they became interested in the implications of science, new technology and the mass media for art and society. Of particular influence on the incubation of cyberart was the 1956 London exhibition This is Tomorrow, a model of collaborative art practice. The catalogue of this show contains the first British published reference to the possible use of computers in art. The artists write of “punched tape … cards” and “motor and input instructions” as being potential tools and methods for art production.1 [image15] Roy Ascott, a student of Hamilton’s, continued the interest in communications systems and cybernetics in the early 60s by incorporating into …
Berenice Carrington. Photo: Herbert Palmer. … art schools at the time? BC: Shelagh Cluett and RICHARD Deacon made the biggest impression on me. They were both insightful about the struggle that you go through when first making your own work.  At Chelsea, there was no perceptual drawing focus while I was there. It did not impact on me particularly, as I considered myself to be a sculptor. [image7] JMcK: You have a distinctive naturalistic drawing style and your drawings are highly evocative. Can you describe the impact your intentions as an artist in anthropological and ethnographic projects has had on the work you do in formal terms? BC: I think of the naturalistic style of my drawing as empathetic realism. The drawings are meant to offer up ordinary things and situations for contemplation. The realistic style of rendering, with its familiarity, helps people to recognise their world first, and then perhaps to consider the effect of seeing things from that world as drawn images. The effect that I am after is phenomenolog…
V&A Museum, Dundee. Entrance. …, is already budgeted at a cost of £1.6 million. RICHARD Armstrong, New York director is quoted as saying “it is a very compelling opportunity to continue our investigations into the possibilities of global interchange”. The bid, if successful could lead to a 2017 opening. The likelihood is that an architect from Finland would be appointed in this case, where there is no shortage of talent. Such a development clearly indicates that Dundee and the V&A have chosen the right model, as first exemplified by the Guggenheim and the City of Bilbao, but with local variability.…
…painting to sounds like music,” said Czech poet RICHARD Weiner, after visiting his friend in Paris in 1912, and, indeed, this was the underlying hope of the artist, whose search for “beautiful forms” led him from the Central European Symbolism of his native Bohemia, to Paris at the turn of the century, where he was inspired by the “vertiginous musicality” of the architecture of the Gothic cathedrals. Believing, like Gauguin, that an artist had to be a revolutionary in order not to become a plagiarist, Kupka cast aside any form of painting with which he had tried to express his feelings symbolically, and began to work with his series of Circulars and Verticals, and, later, Lines, Planes and Spaces. This progression is documented clearly, and the inclusion of comparable works by Kandinsky (along with some less critically praiseworthy portraits by mutual friend and composer Schönberg), relates the Czech’s works to what was going on around him at the time. In 1913, Kupka proc…
Marius Bercea. <em>Elegant Rationalism,</em> 2011. Oil on canvas, 144 x 132 cm (56.69 x 51.97 in). Photo: Peter Mallett. …f the medium. Reference 1. RICHARD Unwin, ‘City Report: Cluj,’ Frieze Blog, <www. blog.frieze.com/cluj/> [accessed 05/10/2011]. …
Tracey Emin.        <em>Another Hammer</em> 1999. 
Monoprint, 
32 x 23 inches (81.3 x 58.4 cm). Copyright © the artist.
Photo: Stephen White. 
Courtesy White Cube. …y, she has received her share of vitriol as well. RICHARD Dorment, critic of The Telegraph, described her Venice Biennale exhibition as the worst exhibition he had seen in 22 years. Emin finds it utterly demoralising to have to deal with criticism that is often a reaction to the shock-value of her work rather than its artistic value. Asked whether she thought that people often misunderstood the real meaning and substance of her work, she responded: “I find it heart breaking. The criticism I received after the Venice Biennale nearly killed me it hurt so much. I think a lot of critics are thoughtless and insensitive, but I have pleasure in knowing [that] that’s not true about myself. I don’t mind being criticized for my art, I can take that, but it’s the personal, vitriolic attacks that really get me down.”6 Nietzsche believed that art was ultimately consolation for the difficulties of life.  One wonders if an artist such as Emin had not experienced traumas as rape and abo…
Doug Cocker studio, Lundie, works in progress, May 2014. Photograph: Janet McKenzie. …art school. JMcK: In the 70s, you exhibited with RICHARD Long and Hamish Fulton when Minimalism, Land Art and the use of natural materials were all being championed. How did those movements and ideas impact on your career as an artist? DC: I was teaching at the art school in Northampton in the 70s and participating in shows such as Nature as Material, On Site at the Arnolfini and the first British Art Show. My work was land-based and reflected the experimental stance I had taken with tools, materials and context. The kind of organic minimalism (for want of a better term) that characterised my output was common, in different ways, to other young sculptors such as John Cobb, David Nash or Dave King. My practice has continued to be shaped by a natural impulse to investigate the potential of materials. But preoccupations change. Over the past 15 months or so, I have been almost exclusively engaged with collage and photomontage: most days, I review and consider my sculpture, but I have ma…
Hansjörg Mayer speaking to Studio International at the opening of Hansjörg Mayer: Typoems and Artists’ Books at the Kunstbibliothek, Berlin, 25 October 2019. Photo: Martin Kennedy. …rst came to England, during a period described by RICHARD Hamilton as one of “technical revolution”, where the traditions of hot-metal typesetting were being superseded by processes of photocomposition. Within Mayer’s titles of the period, we see multiple examples of his exploration of these transitions. Available for reading in the Kunstbibliothek gallery are books made by students at Watford College of Art, where Mayer worked in late 60s and 70s. These convey a highly experimental approach to using (then novel) photocomposition processes. Also on display are prints from Mayer’s third concrete poetry portfolio, made in the letterpress studio at Bath Academy of Art in Corsham. They feature British, American and Canadian poets and were typeset in collaboration with a selected group of Mayer’s graphic design students. [image14] Studio International met Mayer and one of his early collaborators, Frieder Nake, at the exhibition. As we toured around, the pair explained how the w…
…from internationally acclaimed architects such as RICHARD Gluckman, Arata Isozaki, Carlos Jimenez, Ricardo Legorreta and David Schwarz, Ando’s proposal was selected in 1997 and construction began in 1999. Located in Fort Worth's Cultural District, the New Modern sits directly opposite the Kimbell Art Museum, designed by Louis Kahn (and regarded by many as one of the best works of architecture of the 20th century) and near to the Amon Carter Museum, designed by Philip Johnson. Seeking a sensitive relationship to the barrel-vaulted Kimbell, Ando’s design is comprised of five long, flat roof pavilions, aligned on a north-south axis, floating over a 1.5 acre reflective pool of water. It is Ando's largest commission in the United States to date. One of the most prominent features of the New Modern is the impressive 12 metre tall, concrete, Y-shaped columns, supporting the cantilevered concrete roofs of the galleries. The roofs shade the building exterior and allow diffused and reflecte…
Jamian Juliano-Villani. The World's Greatest Planet on Earth, 2016, Installation view, Studio Voltaire, London. Courtesy of the artist and Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin. Photograph: Andy Keate. …artoonists such as Mort Drucker, Ralph Bakshi and RICHARD Corbin, whom she looks to for their confident and direct vocabulary. The smallest work in the exhibition is a black on white portrait, a sketchy caricature of a male face. She uses the language of a cartoonist, yet she also skews the lines, adding her own surreal effect to the work. The images she draws from – photographs, comic books, cartoons, pictures taken from the internet, films and video games – are images we usually glance at only cursorily, yet Juliano-Villani eternalises these passing impressions into paint. She does not elevate painting to the status afforded it by the art world, however: in her vision, these images remain cursory as she discards the next finished painting for a new one, adopting a flippant and distracted attitude to her own work. As a result, strange narratives emerge, telltale of a moment in her life and, consequently, her personal history seeps through the works. Stick Drawing for Hel…
Paul Sandby (1731-1809). <em>The Rainbow</em>, c 1800. Nottingham City Museums and Galleries. …ut, Paul Sandby stood with such contemporaries as RICHARD Wilson, Joseph Wright of Derby or indeed William Hogarth, yet he has never been deemed by critics worthy of the same critical attention as the others. All were active during a major transitional period in the economic and social history of the British Isles, as the Industrial Revolution gathered force. Even over the 200 years since Sandby’s death there has been little awareness of the role he played in the cultural life of England. While the context for landscape painting was already well defined by his contemporaries, well known landscape architects such as Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown seemed not to favour him, although for example Wilson painted a number of the country ‘seats’ which Brown had embellished. It seems that Sandby was graded as a professional draughtsman, a topographical artist of lower rank. Despite his preference for watercolours, indeed a degree of pre-eminen…
California Video: Artists and Histories … Studio International’s Editor at the time, RICHARD Cork, was quick to realise the full significance of video as a medium in art. He also recognised in particular, Stoerchle’s true worth and Miles Varner’s article was placed in pole position, in that issue, consolidating both his teaching and experimental role and its premiation of process, per se. Catherine Taft here raises the question of the mythology that emerged and grew rapidly around the dead artist (not unlike that which follows land artist Robert Smithson even today). Stoerchle’s horse ride from Toronto to Los Angeles (his point of arrival) merely embellished his creative reputation. Significant in the subsequent galaxy of talent from Long Beach was of course Bill Viola. As Pauline Stakelon aptly describes here, 'Viola came to understand that video was an electronic circuit independent of any external reality, a realisation that led him to refocus his attention on his viewer’s percept…
Harold Cohen’s Drawing Machine in 1979. Courtesy Harold Cohen’s archive. … featured the sculptor Anthony Caro, the painters RICHARD Smith and Robyn Denny, as well as another painter, Bernard Cohen, Harold’s younger brother. Although the main award did not go to the UK, the career of all five took off following the exhibition and they continued to gain international prestige, conquering museums and galleries. Cohen, however, preferred to follow a more intricate path, radically changing his stance on art. Coincidentally, another of the interviewees featured in the same June 1966 issue of Studio International, Marcel Duchamp – in one of his last conversations published during his lifetime4 – had done a similar thing, abandoning painting in 1918 to follow a more cerebral artistic practice. Cohen, at the height of his career, with works in collections such as the Tate Gallery, likewise left everything behind. Interviewed for the magazine by art critic Dore Ashton, Duchamp, when asked if he had anything to say about the extensive connection between art and…
Susan Hiller. Channels, 2013. Installation photograph by Peter White, courtesy the artist, Timothy Taylor Gallery and Matt's Gallery, London. …n-4.php 2. Ibid. 3. Susan Hiller interviewed by RICHARD Grayson for Talking Art at Tate Modern, London, June 14, 2008. 4. “Arthur Watson: Poetic Conceptualist”, Studio International, 2008: www.studiointernational.com 5. Mark Godfrey, The Last Silent Movie, Matt’s Gallery, 12-27 July, 2008, p.6. 6. Hiller: Talking Art, op.cit. 7. Antony Gormley interviewed by Janet McKenzie, Studio Visit 2, Studio International, 4 November 2011. www.studiointernational.com 8. Talking Art, op.cit. 9. Ibid.  …
41. Australia
Sidney Nolan. Ned Kelly, 1946. Enamel on composition board, 90.8 x 121.5 cm. National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. …ollowing in the respective footsteps and brush of RICHARD Long and Paul Klee, the latter of whom Gladwell likes to quote: “Drawing is like taking a line for a walk.” The paradoxical stillness of the moving image creates an extended present moment recalling, “the Aboriginal idea of past, present and future as one”. His evocations of “marking, possessing and confronting unfamiliar territory”12 can be seen to represent the multifarious paths, both physical and spiritual that characterise both Aboriginal and colonial responses to the land. Exploration, the navigation through alien lands by colonists and thereafter waves of migrants is a characteristic of Australian art and the new culture established through the ongoing quest for a personal and national identity. As an appropriate departure from previous surveys of Australian art, the exhibition opens with a superb room of large recent Aboriginal paintings. The land is pivotal to indigenous culture as the Aboriginal curators W…
The Gallery. Photo: Scott Frances. Courtesy: Glenstone Museum. …s Ray’s mock-harvest Untitled (Tractor) (2008), RICHARD Serra’s autumn-red conical Corten-steel Sylvester (2001) and, reaching out to them all, the long shadow of Ellsworth Kelly’s wintry (Untitled) totem.  Gwathmey’s Glenstone “phase one” itself presented as a sculpture, a modernist grey geometry of sleek, angled limestone softened by interventions of long picture windows (one stretching to 37ft) that view on acres of designated grassland. [image6] Detailed with field-marshal precision in the notebook tucked under her arm were Emily Rales’s plans for “phase two”. A call away from her mobile phone was the team of outside and inhouse experts and associates, curators and technicians, landscapers and installers, without whom this immense collaboration would not materialise. Like a latterday Prospero, Emily Wei Rales waved a wand over her incipient paradise. To the north, earth was being excavated and materials hauled in for The Pavilions – 11 interlocked galleri…
Donatello scholar Daniel Zolli. …n to date. Nevertheless, the museum’s director, RICHARD P Townsend, considers the move an opportunity to expand its reach. He says: “I think it’s imperative that in New York – a global capital of culture – there is an institution that provides the additional filter of the Bible’s pivotal role in the western visual tradition, and more largely its culture. With Sculpture in the Age of Donatello, we’ve taken our programme to an entirely new level; the exhibit shows what we can do, and how our unique mission opens opportunities that wouldn’t otherwise exist.” The accompanying catalogue for Sculpture in the Age of Donatello3 contains essays that point to stylistic advances that these artists, all in their 20s when they began work on the cathedral, achieved, sparking what we call the Italian Renaissance. For one event in MOBIA's extensive schedule of related programming,4 the museum partners with the Rubin Museum of Art, which features art from the Himalayas, India and ne…
Martha Friedman, Pore featuring collaborative performance with Silas Riener, 2015. Installation view at Locust Projects, Miami. Photograph: Christian Hernandez. …ner were among the standouts, with Jenny Saville, RICHARD Prince and John Currin among the 11 artists upholding the Gagosian brand. Wednesday, as reported, the main event opened quietly – the early-entry VIP invitations having been cut down to time-tested collectors – but the press was too hasty to attribute the first hours’ hush to poor sales. If, in contrast to the satellite fairs where works priced between $20,000 (£13,286) and $40,000 were flying off walls, main fair buyers were taking their time, making notes, and smart-phone researching comparable gallery and auction sales, it was but to validate such hefty purchases as a 1954, $15m Francis Bacon, a 1971, $10.5m Picasso, two multimillion-dollar Warhol Mao paintings and a $2m Jasper Johns Savarin coffee can monotype! There were no gee-whiz installations, but Jimmie Durham’s classic sculpture of a car crushed by a monolith, and a flashy assemblage anchored by a dead tree that Ai Weiwei had rendered in bronze provided irre…
Hanne Darboven. In-House Letter to Mother at Burgberg, 24.12.1974. Copyright: Hanne Darboven Foundation. Courtesy Christians Verlag, Hamburg. …ough it is always a pleasure to see early work by RICHARD Long and Gilbert & George, they lack the clear connection of the New Yorkers to Darboven’s work. Bernd and Hilla Becher’s Gute Hoffnungs Hütte Oberhausen (1969-72) series is composed of 41 photographs of the same industrial building, which might come as a surprise to those familiar with their more commonly seen inventories of discrete structures. On its own terms, it is a marvel. To place it alongside Darboven as another use of archive is a narrow interpretation of all three practitioners. The Bechers’ revisiting of the same spatial site from different angles seems rather different from Darboven’s multi-panel opuses, such as Milieu >80<, Posthum (1987), in which there is a sense of progression with each iteration. You could scramble the order of the Bechers’ works, but Darboven’s are sequential. On the exhibition’s evidence, it is Kawara who emerges as Darboven’s kindred spirit. One of Darboven’s mo…
Hamish Fulton. Google Champa Tenzin, Tibet, 2007, 2007. Framed archival inkjet print, 48 × 75 cm. © Hamish Fulton. Courtesy Parafin, London. Photo: Peter Mallet. …e other British artists of his generation such as RICHARD Long, Gilbert & George and Art & Language.  Still, it is often the material object we come to see and Parafin is a small space, so to accommodate the range of Fulton’s practice with pieces from 1973 to the present day is a challenge. To accommodate large-scale wall texts is doubly challenging, especially when the exhibition’s starting point World Within a World, Duncansby Head to Lands End, Scotland Wales England 1973 (1973) is 6 metres (20 feet) across. [image5] Walking is Fulton’s medium and he has been committed to its importance as an aesthetic medium for decades. He is not concerned with walking for its artistic resonances alone, but regards the importance of walking as widely as its many functions as a mode of transport, a means of protest, a way of linking communities and as a spiritual tool. His engagement with walking as an artistic practice has resulted in a body of work that not only traces indivi…
Kurt Schwitters. En Morn, 1947. © Centre Georges Pompidou, Musée national d’art moderne, Paris/DACS 2012. … of Schwitters most felt?  Certainly by both RICHARD Hamilton and Eduardo Paolozzi, and indeed influencing in attitude Nigel Henderson, and so permeating through British Pop Art. Paolozzi was emphatic about this5 with a later and revealing observation. He had while still at the Slade been enabled by E. T. Mesens of the London Gallery to study the collages still there in 1946. Paolozzi commented: “Schwitters made his collages (most likely) according to the laws of chance-very much part of recent art history. Although one must retain the image of raw material-rejected rubbish such as used bus tokens-the dynamic part is the commitment of finally sticking down the objects. The excitement truly comes when the artist at that moment actually goes beyond his own preconceptions and aspirations.” Of the later works, as postmodernism encroached upon curated reservations in the 1980s, it was evident that John Elderfield sensed a weakness there: yet Nicholas Wadley6 in his appraisal recog…
Damien Hirst. The Collector with Friend. Bronze, 185.5 x 123.5 x 73 cm. Photograph: Joe Lloyd. … The YBA’s watery comeback dazzles with its extravagance, but the audacity of Hirst’s exhibition only goes so far Punta della Dogana and Palazzo Grassi, Venice 9 April – 3 December 2017 by JOE LLOYD In the atrium of Venice’s Palazzo Grassi stands an 18-metre tall statue of a headless titan, so prodigious that its installation required the temporary removal of the palace’s roof – this is Demon with Bowl, the colossal centrepiece of Damien Hirst’s Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable. Made from resin coated to appear bronze and encrusted with aquatic debris, the sculpture’s sheer monumentality is exhilarating. Its dread head lies adjacent, and identifies it as a comical over-enlargement of William Blake’s The Ghost of a Flea (c1819-20). After dipping one’s toe into some of the more tepid exhibits in the Venice Biennale’s official exhibition, Viva Arte Viva, Treasures’ audacity comes as a bracing plunge pool. [image4] Treasures abounds with reference…
Jedd Novatt with Chaos SAS, 2013. Stainless steel, 440 x 420 x 265 cm. Permanent installation at Pérez Art Museum, Miami. …you think about Mark Rothko or go down the list - RICHARD Serra, Carl Andre or Frank Gehry, Eduardo Chillida - all these people whose work I do admire - I think you keep pushing ideas as hard as you can. And, by the way, it’s not about the idea of finishing something, or completing something. If I come back in 100 years, I could tell you – ah, yeah, this work did solve something. But I’ve no idea now. No artist does. That’s the absurdity of the idea that the artist is going to have some clue about their own work, and I know that I don’t. I just keep on making work. And so on with the next one, and the next one. In the end, this body of work will exist and in the future they’re going to have some way of deciding what it means, or how it fits or doesn’t fit, but it’s ultimately just a giant puzzle to me. At the end of the day, all the works I’ve created are part of that puzzle. [image12] VS: You said in an interview once that the placement of your work in cities or la…
An interview with Marcel Duchamp by Dore Ashton. First published in Studio International, Vol 171, No 878, June 1966, page 244. …main enemies.’ What, I asked, does he think of RICHARD Hamilton’s professorial analysis of the Bottle Dryer; his discussion of the ‘symmetry’, etc.? ‘Symmetry was only a point in my life. Since asymmetry dominated from 1870, I re-introduced symmetry in order to use something not accepted at the time. If you think of the kind of distorting for distorting’s sake indulged in by Matisse.... He did it for pleasure, for the fun of it. He was right to do it, but I have to laugh at the great theories around it. Yes, he was retinal all right. But the retina is only a door that you open to go further.’ I asked Duchamp whether he had anything to say about the extensive linking of art with technology, and the attempts to make him a progenitor of the tendency. ‘They have to get somebody as a progenitor so as not to look as though they invent it all by themselves. Makes a better package. But technology: art will be sunk or drowned by technology. Look, I’ll show you an example.…


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