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…British and American artists such as Keith Milow, RICHARD Smith and Barry Flanagan. Between 1971 and 1974 Gormley travelled through Turkey, Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India and finally Sri Lanka. In India, and under the studies of Buddhism and Vipassana meditation, Gormley would experience a different outlook on life. It was here that Gormley met a Burmese teacher called Goenka, who would become his guru. Goenka was a successful business- man who taught Gormley practiced techniques of meditation not as a religion but as a form of healing and a method of self-transformation, which focused on the connection between the mind and the body. Joseph Beuys was the 'most important artist to have been alive in my own time.'3 On his return in 1974, Gormley enrolled at the Central School of Art for a three- year degree course but Gormley left after a year and went to Goldsmith's School of Art in 1975. He went onto complete a further two years at the Slade School of Fine Art in 1977. Thi…
Robert Louis Stevenson by John Singer Sargent, 1887. Copyright: Courtesy of the Taft Museum of Art, Cincinnati, Ohio. …ist. Part of the aim of this exhibition, curator RICHARD Ormond tells us, is to demonstrate this otherwise neglected side of Sargent, but the picture that started it all is a modestly sized and initially unassuming painting. Robert Louis Stevenson and His Wife (1885) depicts the writer’s wiry figure as he paces the floor, nervously stroking his moustache. His large, wide-set eyes glance towards us as if he has only just noticed that there is someone in the room. The composition is an unusual one. Between Stevenson and his wife, Fanny, is an open door leading into a dark hallway, as if a third presence has entered the room. If this powerful painting was to be exhibited, it needed a context and the context was Sargent’s friends. Dr Pozzi at Home (1881) could hardly sit in sharper contrast to the portrait of Stevenson. Samuel-Jean Pozzi, we are told, was the father of modern French gynaecology, and, by all accounts, a bit of a libertine. He did much to advance medicine for women and…
Art Basel Miami Beach 2018, Al Held, B/W XIV, 1968 (left), Lynda Benglis, NAR, 1980 (centre), Sean Scully, Stack Greys, 2018 (right). Installation view, Art Basel Miami Beach 2018. Photo: Jill Spalding. …n Wearing C-type prints the Guggenheim Museum’s RICHARD Armstrong was considering. Also, new-to-the-pantheon luminaries such as Mark Bradford, Mark Grotjahn and – spotlit by her portrait of Michele Obama – Amy Sherald, whose auction prices have soared. And artists coming off of, or anticipating, a museum survey or solo mega-gallery exhibition. Scooped up by Pace and Hauser & Wirth, and showing until March at Miami’s new ICA museum, Larry Bell led the California light and space art revival that also brought (and sold) work by Peter Alexander and John McLaughlin; ahead of his Met Breuer retrospective, the ripped canvases of Argentina’s Lucio Fontana dotted four fairs; two small sculptures by Pedro Reyes, the featured artist at Design Miami, sold quickly, as did work by Dorothea Rockburne, recently profiled at Dia Beacon, and Nari Ward, extensively exhibited at the Pérez Art Museum Miami. Strong interest, too, in work by Adrian Piper, coming off his retrospective at MoMA;…
Luke Gottelier. Swarmy, 2001. Oil on canvas, 127 x 102 cm. …aricaturists James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson and RICHARD Newton. Gottelier’s paintings are like abstract in-jokes. A 2011 series of paintings involved the artist weaving secondhand ties through his canvases. He left them to hang off the bottom of the work, like a tie slung over the back of a chair after a long day in the office. Woman with Tits (2002) features a layered, abstract background, the topmost colour being a dark green that reveals, between drips, shades of yellow, orange and green. A worming line of lime works its way around the canvas, which is ambiguously either figurative or abstract. Details are added in another layer with a scrub of bluish paint. This work is hung above Lamb’s Scrap Poly Bench 1 (2014), a long bench that fades from white to aqua to apple to lemon to rose. Leaning on another pastel fade bench, Scrap Poly Bench 3 (pastel rainbow) (2014), is Joie de Vivre (2001) in which a curling telephone wire of paint trails its way from top to bottom. Two bloodsh…
…er of Quanterness, and our response to works like RICHARD Long's Chalk Line of 1984, which bears an uncanny formal resemblance to the outer sandstone surface of the Orkney cairn. Much of this is a direct - and moving - reflection of the author's own experiences as an archaeologist, and of a lifetime spent in the company of contemporary art and artists. Yet it is neither a series of personal responses nor an exercise in Gombrichian mix-and-match, but an entirely new account of why 20th and 21st century artists have been driven to answer the questions asked by Gauguin's famous symbolist canvas of over a century ago 'Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going?' Renfrew finds the answers to these questions in homo sapiens's engagement with the world of 'material-symbolic culture' in early agrarian societies, in the stone monuments of structures like Stonehenge and Orkney, where artefacts symbolised the relationship between idea and object, before the emergence of writing in th…
Anish Kapoor. <em>Leviathan</em>, 2011. View from inside the artwork. Photo Plowy Didier - All Rights Reserved Monumenta 2011, the Ministry of Culture and Communication. …The following year was the chance of the American RICHARD Serra who, with his minimalist approach, placed large-scale sheets of metal in the exhibition. In 2010, it was the French artist Christian Boltanski who forged an installation that combined sounds and memories represented by mountains of clothes. This year the challenge was given to this Indian-born British artist who conceived the apocalyptical monster Leviathan in the heart of Paris. Poetically playing with a pre-modern design and ancient myths, Kapoor has once again proved that his artistic endeavour is key to understanding the path that sculpture in taking in the 21st century.…
…at kind of media, Flash, was a live video quoting RICHARD Serra’s early video called Boomerang. She has also done a few shows, in and outside school. She has a major in art. She’s a writer, too. But for now she really enjoys driving her Volkswagen. ABD: Would you say words and concepts are toys for you? Is there humour in your work? ßGH: Yes, there is some humour, but I wouldn’t say it is a primary feature. There are some artists who deal a lot with humour. It is one of their roots [or] the branches of their work. I might only come upon it once in a while and maybe bring it out here and there. It’s funny because some things could be terribly humorous. On the other hand, these same things can be simply a demonstration. For example, there is this work I call 'Full Circle', in which I am bending a steel rod that was actually the raw material I used in sculpture. I am bending it at the same time that my voice, combined with electronic sign wave, is making an image of a circle.…
William 
            E. Mossie. Playa Urbana/Urban Beach, 2002. … Channel works from the Collections of Pamela and RICHARD Kramlich and New Art Trust' runs through January 2003. British artist Steve McQueen's cool, soundless projected film entitled 'Just Above My Head' is exemplary, as is the environmentally more raucous 'Phat Free ' (1988) by David Hammons and the transformation of Linda Carter into Wonder Woman in 'Technology /Transfer' (l978-79) by Dara Birnbaum. Also currently running is 'Building Structures'. An architectural presentation by international artists whose names are becoming better known - such figures as Francis Cape, Nathan Carter, Wade Guyton, Rachel Harrison, Chris Hanson, Hendrika Sonnenberg, Ian Kiaer, Ross Knight, Rita McBride, Patrick Meagher, Manfred Pernice, John Powers, Karlis Rekevics, Lara Schnitger and Shirley Tse. It will be interesting to see, in two decades if not one, how many of these aspirants can be re-rated by the museum then, and how many fall by the wayside. This tension of survival is ever present in the …
Portrait of Harold Koda. Photograph: Tatijana Shoan. …e from Harvard. At FIT and the Met, he worked for RICHARD Martin, author of an introduction to James’s work published by Assouline. …
Thinking Machines Corporation, Waltham, Massachusetts. Danny Hillis, Tamiko Thiel, Gordon Bruce, Allen Hawthorne, and Ted Bilodeau. CM-2 Supercomputer. 1987. Steel, plexiglass, and electronics. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Midori Kono Thiel, Mary Austin in honor of Tamiko Thiel, The Aaron and Betty Lee Stern Foundation, and anonymous. Photograph: Stephen F. Grohe. … machine art is Diab DS-101 Computer, designed by RICHARD Hamilton for Ohio Scientific in 1985-1989. Hamilton, who is widely known for being a member of the London-based Independent Group in the 1950s and author of the famous pop art collage from 1956 Just What Is It that Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing?, which criticised postwar consumerism, displays his interest in computer technology as a possible counterforce to mass culture. Ernő Rubik’s ubiquitous Rubik’s Cube (1974) is another reminder of a cultural link between pop culture and computer age. Other projects in this section include designs developed by architect Cedric Price in 1978-1980 for the Generator Project, a complex of buildings for visiting artists in White Oak Plantation, Florida, commissioned by Gilman Paper Corporation. Price’s technical drawings, prints and models are all that is left of his unrealised project, which was conceived as a constantly mutating architecture, transformable through a …
Envelope 
      containing transparencies of Yves Saint Laurent's second haute couture collection 
      as chief designer at Christian Dior, 1958 …0. ISBN 0-316-86023-9 RICHARD Carr…
Matsumoto Hafu (b. 1952) <em>Outsize flower basket</em>, 2008. Bamboo, approximately 20 x 31 in. Collection of Saito Masamitsu. Photo: Tsuyoshi Inui. …ew creativity. In his recent book, The Craftsman, RICHARD Sennett writes of the 10,000 hours or so of practice needed to get a solid grounding in any craft.6 Sennett is writing mainly in Western terms, of course, and I wonder how those approximately five years of grunt work would look to a Japanese master or disciple. Not enough, I suspect! As you have said yourself, bamboo artists - and this is equally true of lacquerers, potters, etc - aren't generally regarded as mature until middle age. Maybe that's more like 60,000 hours in! There is this enduring belief among practitioners of traditional crafts that full maturity is virtually a lifelong task. Again, in terms of practice, another link between all of the artists is the huge importance attached to preparation of materials, so much so that in the case of bamboo, getting the strips ready for weaving (or whatever other technique is to be employed) is said to take 80 per cent of the time needed. Especially in the case of bamboo, because…
Margaret Bourke-White. Self-portrait with camera. Silver print, 34.9 x 22.7 cm. Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Los Angeles. © Digital Image Museum Associates/LACMA/Art Resource NY/Scala, Florence. …s on photography by Roland Barthes, translated by RICHARD Howard, published by Vintage, London, 2000, page 5.  …
Nicholas Rena and Matthew Smith. Proving Ground. Photograph: Phil Sayer. …the American minimalists, notably Donald Judd and RICHARD Serra – both artists who employ a blunt visual language. From his example I learnt that clay could be made to appear like steel, that it had this capacity to be both curvilinear and ‘stretching’ in effect yet also have the precision and determination of steel. Martin Smith is a generation younger than Gordon Baldwin; his pieces are very much more of this present world, in the sense that the industrially designed world surrounding us is also hard-edged and precise. Acknowledging the nature and visual language of the world as it is now made is important to me – to that extent Gordon Baldwin’s work now seems like a dream I loved but can no longer share.8 Rena is currently working on a major allegorical piece: The Supper at Emmaus (after Caravaggio) a homage to the painting by Carravaggio (1571–1610) of the same title (1601). On the one hand, a group of figures around a plate of bread; on the other, two jugs aroun…
Sam Stewart: Cryptic. Installation view, courtesy of the artist and Fort Gansevoort, New York. Photograph: Lauren Coleman. …ng that history to create these sculptural works. RICHARD Artschwager was one of the first people I discovered, which was amazing. Lucas Samaras, who was known mostly for his boxes, was another important person. Ettore Sottsass, the Memphis Group designer, and Jean Prouvé were also important. All of my knowledge about these artists was through the gallery. Then, as I went along, I realised that the artists who were making furniture were not necessarily furniture-makers. It wasn’t just about functional or formal developments. I started thinking about conceptual artists such as Lucy McKenzie and Mary Heilmann. I also remember seeing the Marcel Broodthaers show at the Museum of Modern Art, which was huge for me. AB: Although the works you have created here for this imagined domestic space are functional – tables, chairs, a bench press – the materials and forms you have incorporated make it obvious that these objects are not to be handled. SS: These works are not utilitarian. I st…
Aída Rubio González. Florence, 2013. Oil on canvas, 146 x 195 cm. Courtesy Rosenfeld Porcini. … will be (2013), based on the movie Donnie Darko (RICHARD Kelly, 2001), both the viewer and the man in the picture look down on a boxed scene, in a stance suggesting that of the director. The sole film work in the exhibition is Blessed are you who come by Fatma Bucak (born 1982). Rich in its possible interpretations, this enigmatic and atmospheric video, shot on the Turkish-Armenian border against the backdrop of the remains of an early 12th century church, shows a group of village men as they watch a woman dressed in black carry out a curious ritual. Shot almost entirely from a fixed frame, this contemporary piece echoes the structure and content of the Old Masters amidst which it is being shown, and is, on many levels, the least dynamic and offers the least interwoven narrative of them all. Bringing together these works, juxtaposing their styles and contents, and contrasting their moral lessons, as well as being a fascinating exercise in and of itself, also vehemently contradicts t…
Cybernetic Serendipity: the computer and the arts. Edited by Jasia Reichardt. Published by Studio International (special issue), 1968. …tists, architects, theorists and critics included RICHARD Hamilton, Reyner Banham, Eduardo Paolozzi, Peter and Alison Smithson and Theo Crosby. Inspired by Scientific American, Wiener’s writings, Claude Shannon’s information theory, John von Neumann’s game theory and D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson’s book On Growth and Form, they became interested in the implications of science, new technology and the mass media for art and society. Of particular influence on the incubation of cyberart was the 1956 London exhibition This is Tomorrow, a model of collaborative art practice. The catalogue of this show contains the first British published reference to the possible use of computers in art. The artists write of “punched tape … cards” and “motor and input instructions” as being potential tools and methods for art production.1 [image15] Roy Ascott, a student of Hamilton’s, continued the interest in communications systems and cybernetics in the early 60s by incorporating into …
V&A Museum, Dundee. Entrance. …, is already budgeted at a cost of £1.6 million. RICHARD Armstrong, New York director is quoted as saying “it is a very compelling opportunity to continue our investigations into the possibilities of global interchange”. The bid, if successful could lead to a 2017 opening. The likelihood is that an architect from Finland would be appointed in this case, where there is no shortage of talent. Such a development clearly indicates that Dundee and the V&A have chosen the right model, as first exemplified by the Guggenheim and the City of Bilbao, but with local variability.…
…painting to sounds like music,” said Czech poet RICHARD Weiner, after visiting his friend in Paris in 1912, and, indeed, this was the underlying hope of the artist, whose search for “beautiful forms” led him from the Central European Symbolism of his native Bohemia, to Paris at the turn of the century, where he was inspired by the “vertiginous musicality” of the architecture of the Gothic cathedrals. Believing, like Gauguin, that an artist had to be a revolutionary in order not to become a plagiarist, Kupka cast aside any form of painting with which he had tried to express his feelings symbolically, and began to work with his series of Circulars and Verticals, and, later, Lines, Planes and Spaces. This progression is documented clearly, and the inclusion of comparable works by Kandinsky (along with some less critically praiseworthy portraits by mutual friend and composer Schönberg), relates the Czech’s works to what was going on around him at the time. In 1913, Kupka proc…
Marius Bercea. <em>Elegant Rationalism,</em> 2011. Oil on canvas, 144 x 132 cm (56.69 x 51.97 in). Photo: Peter Mallett. …f the medium. Reference 1. RICHARD Unwin, ‘City Report: Cluj,’ Frieze Blog, <www. blog.frieze.com/cluj/> [accessed 05/10/2011]. …
Tracey Emin.        <em>Another Hammer</em> 1999. 
Monoprint, 
32 x 23 inches (81.3 x 58.4 cm). Copyright © the artist.
Photo: Stephen White. 
Courtesy White Cube. …y, she has received her share of vitriol as well. RICHARD Dorment, critic of The Telegraph, described her Venice Biennale exhibition as the worst exhibition he had seen in 22 years. Emin finds it utterly demoralising to have to deal with criticism that is often a reaction to the shock-value of her work rather than its artistic value. Asked whether she thought that people often misunderstood the real meaning and substance of her work, she responded: “I find it heart breaking. The criticism I received after the Venice Biennale nearly killed me it hurt so much. I think a lot of critics are thoughtless and insensitive, but I have pleasure in knowing [that] that’s not true about myself. I don’t mind being criticized for my art, I can take that, but it’s the personal, vitriolic attacks that really get me down.”6 Nietzsche believed that art was ultimately consolation for the difficulties of life.  One wonders if an artist such as Emin had not experienced traumas as rape and abo…
Doug Cocker studio, Lundie, works in progress, May 2014. Photograph: Janet McKenzie. …art school. JMcK: In the 70s, you exhibited with RICHARD Long and Hamish Fulton when Minimalism, Land Art and the use of natural materials were all being championed. How did those movements and ideas impact on your career as an artist? DC: I was teaching at the art school in Northampton in the 70s and participating in shows such as Nature as Material, On Site at the Arnolfini and the first British Art Show. My work was land-based and reflected the experimental stance I had taken with tools, materials and context. The kind of organic minimalism (for want of a better term) that characterised my output was common, in different ways, to other young sculptors such as John Cobb, David Nash or Dave King. My practice has continued to be shaped by a natural impulse to investigate the potential of materials. But preoccupations change. Over the past 15 months or so, I have been almost exclusively engaged with collage and photomontage: most days, I review and consider my sculpture, but I have ma…
…from internationally acclaimed architects such as RICHARD Gluckman, Arata Isozaki, Carlos Jimenez, Ricardo Legorreta and David Schwarz, Ando’s proposal was selected in 1997 and construction began in 1999. Located in Fort Worth's Cultural District, the New Modern sits directly opposite the Kimbell Art Museum, designed by Louis Kahn (and regarded by many as one of the best works of architecture of the 20th century) and near to the Amon Carter Museum, designed by Philip Johnson. Seeking a sensitive relationship to the barrel-vaulted Kimbell, Ando’s design is comprised of five long, flat roof pavilions, aligned on a north-south axis, floating over a 1.5 acre reflective pool of water. It is Ando's largest commission in the United States to date. One of the most prominent features of the New Modern is the impressive 12 metre tall, concrete, Y-shaped columns, supporting the cantilevered concrete roofs of the galleries. The roofs shade the building exterior and allow diffused and reflec…
Jamian Juliano-Villani. The World's Greatest Planet on Earth, 2016, Installation view, Studio Voltaire, London. Courtesy of the artist and Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin. Photograph: Andy Keate. …artoonists such as Mort Drucker, Ralph Bakshi and RICHARD Corbin, whom she looks to for their confident and direct vocabulary. The smallest work in the exhibition is a black on white portrait, a sketchy caricature of a male face. She uses the language of a cartoonist, yet she also skews the lines, adding her own surreal effect to the work. The images she draws from – photographs, comic books, cartoons, pictures taken from the internet, films and video games – are images we usually glance at only cursorily, yet Juliano-Villani eternalises these passing impressions into paint. She does not elevate painting to the status afforded it by the art world, however: in her vision, these images remain cursory as she discards the next finished painting for a new one, adopting a flippant and distracted attitude to her own work. As a result, strange narratives emerge, telltale of a moment in her life and, consequently, her personal history seeps through the works. Stick Drawing for Hel…
Paul Sandby (1731-1809). <em>The Rainbow</em>, c 1800. Nottingham City Museums and Galleries. …ut, Paul Sandby stood with such contemporaries as RICHARD Wilson, Joseph Wright of Derby or indeed William Hogarth, yet he has never been deemed by critics worthy of the same critical attention as the others. All were active during a major transitional period in the economic and social history of the British Isles, as the Industrial Revolution gathered force. Even over the 200 years since Sandby’s death there has been little awareness of the role he played in the cultural life of England. While the context for landscape painting was already well defined by his contemporaries, well known landscape architects such as Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown seemed not to favour him, although for example Wilson painted a number of the country ‘seats’ which Brown had embellished. It seems that Sandby was graded as a professional draughtsman, a topographical artist of lower rank. Despite his preference for watercolours, indeed a degree of pre-eminen…


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