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Beth Fisher RSA. <em>Burial II, </em>Letting Go Series, 2006. Cont …ip Pearlman’s coolly posed figure compositions. RICHARD Hamilton’s My Marilyn, which I saw in 1965, became a point of reference: the synthesis of the screen-printed set of publicity photos laid out with her marks of rejection or of approval overworked autographically by Hamilton implied the artist’s act of witness in a narrative, which reflected both the public debate about the use and misuse of a cultural icon, and the private distress of a person. It implied the artist’s act of witness to the subject’s voice.”12 Beth Fisher’s work has drawn entirely on her experiences as mother, daughter, and wife to fulfil her emotionally and artistically. “This exposure of the tradition of woman as myth, or woman as object, triggered a sense of layers of conflict, and concern to explore issues of female identity. I now realise that my postgraduate work, while it dealt fairly abstractly with content from literary sources and opera, all centred on women: women as implacable femm…
Richard Mosse. Man-Size, North Kivu, eastern Congo, 2011. Digital C print, 72 x 90 in. © Richard Mosse. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery. …on 12 May cover an international spread: they are RICHARD Mosse (Ireland), Alberto García-Alix (Spain), Lorna Simpson (America) and Jochen Lempert of Germany. Photographers are nominated for the prize based on the success of a particular exhibition staged or publication released during a given time (in this case, between 1 October 2012 and 30 September 2013), and although the prize prides itself on having launched many careers, the 2014 shortlist seems to consolidate and reward established artists more than it signals the vanguard of photographic practice. Lempert is nominated for a major solo exhibition and Simpson for a retrospective, both markers of institutional recognition; Mosse is nominated for his exhibition The Enclave at the Irish Pavilion at the Venice Biennale, arguably contemporary art’s most influential biennial; and García-Alix’s Autorretrato/Self-Portrait, the 2013 publication that brought him to the attention of the Deutsche Börse jury, is a body of work made o…
Bernhard Sachs. <em>Untitled</em>, 2004. Acrylic and charcoal on cotton, 150 x 300 cm. Photo Julie Davies. …e with space that artists such as Sol Le Witt and RICHARD Long first explored in the 1960s and 1970s. The Avenue of Honour – anatomy of a monument (1995) takes the evidence of a War Memorial made in Bacchus Marsh, Victoria, and examines its meaning and impact over time. After the First World War avenues of trees were planted on the approaches to many country towns in Australia. Each tree represented an ANZAC soldier who had served, and in many cases died. Eaton focuses in part on the fact that our mode of travel now, at speed in a car, results in a very different grasp of the significance of the memorial that was planted when most people in the country still travelled by horse and cart. Where the trees were just saplings at the time they were planted, now they form a tree tunnel, “A rough reckoning of time suggests that the community would travel in the shadow of death until the trees grew tall enough to shade the avenue”.24 At speed the avenue of trees is now just a blur; the n…
Celia Scott. <em>Vulcan</em>, 1983. Sitter: Eduardo Paolozzi. Plaster (also cast in bronze), 58 x 35 x 28 cm. © the artist. …n the second room are the two American architects RICHARD Meier and Michael Graves, mediated by contemporary “guru” and fellow architect Peter Eisenman, with two further talents either side of him. In the sanctuary of the patio are four key figures: Leon Krier (architect, called here “the Polemicist”) with Alan Colquhoun (architect and critic). Opposite are his former partner John Miller and architect Edward Jones. It was Leon Krier who started the whole sequence with a commission for his own head, now appropriately standing in the Prince of Wales’ garden at Highgrove. It would be wrong to suggest that Celia Scott pays no regard to the long precedent of the sculpted head. Her head of Alan Colquhoun as an obsessive intellectual was partly inspired by a bust of the Roman senator Seneca.1 One could suggest too that John Cheere’s 18th century bust of Cicero in plaster2 conveys the same quality of intellectual enquiry, of which Scott would have been at least aware. Unlike Rodin…
Seth Cluett: The Persistence of Traces, 2014. Installation view, Audio Visual Arts, New York. …ent of Sol LeWitt’s instructional patterning or RICHARD Long’s looped walks and stone circles, which seek to bring structure to the unstructured natural landscape. Cluett here presents the same themes through pared-down technology and aesthetics with audio and film. This show is a chamber of sounds and silences, retreating from the bustle of the street to a seclusion of subtle undertones, tracking and tracing invisible movements and the unrelenting ephemeral momentum of nature.  …
Utagawa Kuniyoshi, <em>Minamoto no Raiko and His Retainers Battle with the Earth Spider</em>, early 1820’s.  Colour woodblock print, Right: 14 1/2 x 10 1/8 in., Centre:14 1/2 x 10 1/8 in., Left:14 1/2 x 10 1/8 in. American Friends of The British Museum (The Arthur R. Miller Collection) 20904. Photo © Trustees of The British Museum. … prints began nearly 30 years ago with a visit to RICHARD Kruml's print gallery (now closed) near Brown's Hotel in Mayfair, London. Although brief, Professor Miller's foreword evokes the excitement he must have felt upon seeing Kuniyoshi's dynamically designed and coloured prints. At the time, Miller had never heard of Kuniyoshi and knew little about the ukiyo-e school. Subsequently, he spent time in London studying Japanese culture and art, meeting with dealer Israel Goldman and Basil W. Robinson (1912–2005), former keeper of the metalwork department at the Victoria and Albert Museum.2 Following his donation, Miller's collection had its public debut at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, the city he associates with Kuniyoshi.3 Written by Timothy Clark, head of the Japanese section in the department of Asia at the British Museum, the 340-page catalogue reproduces hundreds of prints illustrating Kuniyoshi's works in all ukiyo-e categories (warriors, beautiful women, l…
Richard Nicholson. <em>Gordon Bishop Associates, Paddington Street</em>, 2006. Courtesy of the artist and Riflemaker. …dio set-up as the audio equivalent of the work of RICHARD Nicholson. Nicholson presents a series of images of the darkroom. These images first and foremost act as documents for the steady demise of the darkroom but they also record these spaces as chaotic, often crammed full of photographic papers, and filters, and dog-eared stacks of photographs, and some miscellaneous objects, such as a ceramic shoe or a plastic figurine, and of enlargers of different sizes, with some mounted on tracks, and others perched precariously on shelves; and one notices the black paint peeling off the walls too. In some sense, the objects, the dolls, the boxes and the general disorderliness is a welcome antidote to the often-clinical surroundings of its digital counterpart. As in the case of the analogue sound, the so-called interference, the dust and scratches, has its visual equivalent in what might be called the clutter constituted by these objects. Clare Mitton brings an incongruent element to this exhi…
Cristóbal Balenciaga at work, Paris, 1968. Photograph by Henri Cartier-Bresson © Henri Cartier-Bresson, Magnum Photos. … a Harper’s Bazaar cover shows a photograph by RICHARD Avedon of one of Balenciaga’s full red-and-black flamenco-style skirts. Balenciaga’s contemporary influence is shown upstairs in the fashion gallery on level one just beneath the impressive domed ceiling of the building. Titled Balenciaga’s Legacy, this section occupies about half of the total exhibition space. Dresses from the 1960s onwards, by a mix of international designers, are displayed alongside video interviews with Molly Goddard, Gareth Pugh and Josep Font, director of Delpozo, who credit Balenciaga as their inspiration. It was in 1986, 14 years after Balenciaga’s death, that Balenciaga relaunched under new direction. There is little context given about this development and the legacies of Nicolas Ghesquière, who was creative director from 1997 until 2012, and that of the current creative director, Demna Gvasalia. A couple of their dresses are displayed, yet the exhibition curation always returns to the remit…
Alberto Giacometti. <em>The Cage (first version)</em>, 1949–1950. Painted plaster, 91.1 x 38.5 x 34.9 cm. Fondation Alberto et Annette Giacometti, Paris © Adagp …ompidou with Sacre Coeur as a backdrop. Where the RICHARD Rogers building externalises its structure, by contrast the Giacometti sculptures are deeply internalised and contrast richly with this setting. The effects are stunning and reflect Giacometti's continuous interest in how his work was perceived, the parameters of a base, the way a figure sits within a frame. The top floor of the Pompidou becomes one large space frame. David Sylvester, in his celebrated 1994 book Looking at Giacometti said that, 'One of the most satisfying qualities in the way Giacometti's sculptures re-create appearance is how bodies disappear at their edges - a sort of three-dimensional sfumato'.1 Curiously, this very quality ensures you can still enjoy the work with a host of other people, as they ebb and flow, walking and pausing to scrutinise the tiniest plaster fragments. It all seems part of the theatre of Giacometti. His work famously only portrays men walking while the women are static. Vanessa Beecr…
Robyn Denny: Paintings from the 1960s, installation view. Copyright the artist, courtesy the New Art Centre, Roche Court Sculpture Park. …Anthony Caro, Bernard and Harold Cohen, Denny and RICHARD Smith), which roused great interest in 1966, was reviewed by David Thompson for Studio International and recently republished. [image8] In 1973, Denny appeared on the cover of Studio International in a photograph of the abstract artist in his studio. This year, the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds exhibited work from Gall in which he used old copies of The Studio magazines as a departure point for collage and drawn forms. [image15] The unique exhibition spaces at Roche Court, under the skilful charge of director Stephen Feeke, lend a contemporary take to the abstract art of the 60s. Far from being nostalgic, the Denny exhibition prompts visual dialogue between the architectural space, the paintings themselves and the viewer. The gallery that links the house to the orangery was always conceived as an indoor / outdoor space. It is primarily a sculpture gallery (although painting exhibitions are regularly staged) and it is design…
<em>Nostalgia in Vogue</em> book cover …e John Rawlings, Norman Parkinson, Horst P Horst, RICHARD Avedon, Irving Penn, Cecil Beaton, Annie Leibovitz, Herb Ritts and Helmut Newton. In some cases, writers ponder photographs of themselves. For example, Joyce Maynard considers Avedon’s 1973 portrait of her aged 19, which was taken after two life-altering events: publication of her first book and the end of her relationship with JD Salinger. Comparing Avedon’s image with one of herself as a smiling, hopeful 18-year-old Yale undergraduate, published on the cover of The New York Times Magazine, Maynard asks, “When did I become that haunted-looking person?” and calls herself a fool for supposing that “because a famous photographer of beautiful women had taken my picture, I might look like a beautiful woman myself”. Maynard’s rendering of heartbreak and overwhelming loss is an unsettling, brutally honest account of accelerated maturity. Similarly, in 1969 actor Anjelica Huston found herself in a Vogue photo shoot with…
Peter Lanyon. Calm Air, 1961. Oil on canvas, 60 x 48 in. Private collection. …of works by Paul Nash, the Futurist Tullio Crali, RICHARD Carline and Walter Thomas Monnington. The latter two English artists depicted flight or the bird’s eye views it enabled during the first and second world wars respectively, though their handling of paint and their deployment of single perspectives did not depart from long-established land-based conventions. In contrast, the catalogue only nods towards Lanyon’s involvement with abstract expressionism. He visited New York in 1957, striking up friendships with artists including Mark Rothko and Robert Motherwell and seeing an exhibition by Willem de Kooning. The impact of De Kooning – then the most influential painter in New York – is surely as important to the shifts in Lanyon’s work as was its subject matter changing from “place” to “weather” to “glider”. Beyond the formal impetus De Kooning provided, it also seems productive to think about both him and Lanyon through their parallel investigations of an allus…
James Richards. Radio at Night, 2015. Installation view, Requests and Antisongs, 2016. Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Arts. Photograph: Mark Blower. … digital installations. With his latest offering, RICHARD stages a multisensory triptych in the ICA’s three large exhibition spaces, with the intention of forming visual and aural resonances across the works installed there: the sound piece Crumb Mahogany (2016), the film and audio work Radio at Night (2015) and the slide installation Rushes Minotaur (2016). Despite his evident skill at weaving familiar motifs that repeat themselves throughout the three spaces, Richards’s ambition of creating his own internal language, or even logic, across the triptych could be construed as narcissistic and perhaps even alienating for viewers. The three rooms offer possible interpretations and experiences that the search for Richards’s preconceived patterns might restrict. The lower gallery’s sound piece, Crumb Mahogany, for instance, features complex strata of sounds that oscillate between noise as stressor and as calmative: rumbling tyres, soft bonging, whispers, screeches, …
Viola Frey. <em>Non-Endangered Beaver,</em> 1973. Ceramic with glazes. Courtesy Artists …a major in craft. She studied painting there with RICHARD Diebenkorn and, as mentioned, colour with Rothko at Tulane. Her sophisticated handling of paint and colour can been seen in expressionistic works like China Goddess Painting (acrylic, 1975). A primary characteristic, Frey's painterly approach to ceramics and sculpture admirably succeeds in Red Buddha plate (1994) and Weeping Woman (1990–91). George Kubler's The Shape of Time (Yale University Press, 1962) and The Hidden Dimension by Edward T. Hall (Doubleday, 1966) became important to Frey's evolving vision. It is curious that, when she applied to the University of California at Berkeley, Frey aspired to a writing career. As a child, she devoured books borrowed from the public library and her father's copies of National Geographic.5 In her Smithsonian oral history interview, she recounted that when she went to Berkeley to register for classes, she realized that the stories she had to tell required a visual voc…
Antony Gormley. <em>Allotment II</em>, 1996. Copyright the artist. Photograph: Stephen White. …and disappointment here. But in the real world of RICHARD Serra, Anthony Caro and David Smith (and certainly William Tucker) one is bound to think all that was what sculpture is truly about, and not this parade of figures, for the enlightenment of the future. Gormley, for the moment, simply arrests and suspends the present in a vacuum. Stop the train, I want to get off here, (but here's to the Angel of the North, pal, as Bogart would add). What is sculpture really striving for? It is hoped that, with Lottery support and public encouragement, a work proposed for the M4 close to the Severn entry point to Wales from England will go up, and tell us. It is by architect-sculptors Marks Barfield, with the support of Landmark Wales. This is the way to go forward. It takes off from the idea of Gormley's Angel. It is called 'The Red Cloud'. Lets give it a go. Michael Spens …
Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva. Beauty Exposed II, 2016. Sheep stomach, pig intestine and turned wood. …opportunity. I was allowed to participate with Dr RICHARD Day and Dr Caroline Pellet-Many at the laboratories at University College London (UCL). I also shadowed gastroenterology clinical staff in wards and outpatient clinics at Norwich Medical School at the University of East Anglia with Professor Alastair Forbes, to understand the critical impact of nutrition on patients, the difference between healthy and unhealthy guts, the role of bacteria, people with various bowel diseases and intestine failure, either as an illness or self-inflicted. I’ve worked closely with Dr Giles Major and his patients at the University of Nottingham at the Digestive Diseases Centre, observing their research into Inflammatory bowel disease and interviewing patients to understand their history of symptoms and their impact. This has also introduced me to Dr Alex Menys at Motilent and his innovative use of MRI images to develop improved motility analysis. The research aims to explore highly regarded med…
Brillo Boxes. The artist was commissioned to reproduce 1,000 boxes by The Andy Warhol Museum.  250 boxes were given away each day. Photograph: Rosa Lopez. …, and big art world names; collectors Agnes Gund, RICHARD Chang, Stavros Merjos, Martin Margulies. Dealer-collectors like Christine Wachter and the Mugrabis came to buy; dealers who weren’t showing came to check out the competition. Museum directors, easily spotted because they generally walk in flocks, were represented by MOMA’s Glen Lowry, The Whitney’s Adam Weinberg, MoCA’s Bonnie Clearwater and the Bass Museum’s Silvia Cubina; (Miami Art Museum’s hold out for Frieze suggested sour grapes or low finances). Asked what they thought of Armory 2013, some liked it (“there’s more to see this year”) and some thought it disappointing (“I found nothing I wanted to buy”). Most thought the quality far higher than last year, though none raved, and those who hadn’t left before the VIP silver-coded 2 pm hour hated the crowds, but all were heartened by the humming of transactions.  After all, the bottom line for a brand’s expectation is sales, and few dealers went h…
Alice Neel. Harold Cruse, c1950. Oil on canvas, 94 x 55.9 cm (37 x 22 in). Private collection. © The Estate of Alice Neel. Courtesy David Zwirner, New York/London and Victoria Miro, London. …ographer Sam Brody, an abusive man who mistreated RICHARD, the elder son, who was not his own. Neel tolerated this abuse, gaining energy from the emotional stress of her regular jousting matches with Brody. She spoke of her art as a search for freedom – “You never find it because there ain’t any freedom, but at least you search for it” – and also described “serving a sentence”. “Instead of jumping out the window, I’m putting in the time,” she said. Although partly employed by the Works Progress Administration, Neel’s portraits were not specifically commissioned, and she continued to paint people who sparked her interest – African Americans, Latinos, Asians, and other people of colour: dreadlocked Stephen Shepard (1978) was an art student; Pregnant Maria (1964) was a friend of students who lived in Neel’s building; Benjamin (1976) was the son of the superintendent of the building. The latter, a young boy, is portrayed entirely unsentimentally, as are all of her…
From Mori Art Museum Inaugural Exhibition, <i>Happiness</i>. …architecture, Mori called upon American architect RICHARD Gluckman, well known for the Whitney Museum in New York and Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. Mori has also gathered high profile figures from the global museum world including Glenn Lowry from the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Alfred Pacquement from Georges Pompidou Centre in Paris, and Nicholas Serota from the Tate in London to form an international advisory board, thus ensuring that he gets a museum with a truly international viewpoint. Elliott says, 'Tokyo seems to be isolated from the rest of the world and now it is about time to communicate and get involved with the rest of the world'. He recognises great energy in Japanese audiences but points out that the contemporary art community is still very marginal: 'We are very concerned in the relationship between art and our life. Art is only intelligible in its relationship to our life. Without that, art has no meaning. So our policy is to focus on the contemporary, prima…
Sol LeWitt. Drawing Series l968 (Fours) …e rightly traced the term back some four years to RICHARD Wollheim in Arts Magazine, January l965. This last was to create confusion, even discrediting the genre. Reise had, in fact, been asked by Studio International to review the exhibition, 'Minimal Art' mounted at the Gemeentemuseum, The Hague in 1969 by Curator Enno Develing. Reise set out to correct the basic misconceptions, which had proliferated by then over the term. Develing, for his part, made a spirited attempt with the work of ten invited artists, each of whom submitted five works for the show. Sol LeWitt was one of these ten. Reise found his work seemed less material even than Flavin's: Not because his materials are less solid than light, but because his conceptual content dominates its sensuous expression in matter. Lewitt actively de-emphasises the three dimensional tactile properties of his materials.1 Reise pointed out: From early in his career he has neutralised…
Cildo Meireles. The clocks in the background are part of Fontes (1992/2008) installation. …artists (among them British artists Keith Arnatt, RICHARD Long and Gilbert & George). 2. 'Southern Cross' (1969-70) is a small cube measuring less than 1 centimetre. Made of oak and pinewood, sacred trees to the indigenous tribes, the piece was displayed at Tate Modern on the floor of an empty gallery room. The work deals with the problematic simplification which the indigenous people suffered at the hands of the colonizers. The first part of 'Insertions into Ideological Circuits: Project Coca-Cola and Banknote'(1970-76) consisted of sticking political messages (e.g., 'Yankees go home') as transfers on Coca-Cola bottles and returning them to the Coca-Cola warehouse. The messages would only be apparent when filled with liquid again. The same system was applied to the banknotes, but in this case, the notes went into circulation immediately as nobody would keep the money or destroy it. 3. 'Babel' (2001) is a 5 metre-high tower of nearly 700 radios, each one synchronized to a different…
National Museum of the American Indian (Exterior) … zealously, the Founding Director of NMAI, W. RICHARD West, Jr., appointed in 1990, who is a Southern Cheyenne and member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma. The five story, 250,000 sq. ft., $219 million NMAI was originally designed by renowned Native American architect Douglas Cardinal, whose work includes the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Hull. Cardinal was selected as chief design architect in 1993, but was fired in 1998. The dispute between Cardinal and the Smithsonian was settled out of court in 1999, but Cardinal was out. A superb Cardinal designed structure could not be finished on time without him, and the museum was scheduled to open in 2002 but took two more years to finally become a reality. One person missing at the opening ceremonies, and from all the literature abou…
Joseph Beuys (German, 1921-86). <em>Filzanzug (Felt Suit)</em>, 1970. Multiple of felt, composition: 69 7/8 x 28 1/8 x 5 5/16 in (177.5 x 71.5 x 13.5 cm). Publisher: Galerie René Block, Berlin. Fabricator: unknown. Edition: 100. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Associates Fund, 1993. © 2006 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn. …'Bathroom Mirror' and 'Cafe Sign', both 1968, and RICHARD Hamilton's (b.1922) collage-like 'Interior' (1964); Swiss artist Dieter Roth's (1930-98) surreal 'Hut (Hat)' (1968); and German artist Blinky Palermo's (1943-77) child-like '4 Prototypen' ('4 Prototypes') from 1970. In 'Language', journals, art books, screen prints, lithographs, record jackets, linoleum cuts, postcards and other works incorporating letters, numbers, symbols and poetry are displayed. Conceptual artists naturally gravitated towards these modes of expression. Art books amplified the space within which an artist could pursue a theme, allowing it to unfold in space over time. For example, Belgian artist Marcel Broodthaers (1924-76) was a poet and bookseller before he began making art in 1964. His books give a visual life to poetic texts; his own (Pense-Bête, 1964) and one by Stéphane Mallarmé (Un Coup de Dés Jamais n'Abolira le Hasard, 1969), for example. Wye and Weitman point…
Kettle's Yard, Cambridge. New entrance. Fobert Architects © Hufton+Crow. …e a 10kN load, says Fobert, “so it could take a RICHARD Serra now”. These floors have a crude, honest materiality in tune with Martin’s favourite brick, while Fobert’s trademark material – mild steel – appears in a dramatic, zigzagging staircase that sculpts out the circulation space between the new wing’s upper floors; its edges and joins are left tactile and raw. [image6] There are interesting angles, in tune with the nooks and crannies of the old Kettle’s Yard. A comfy window seat extends from the steel stair frame at the stair’s top, with a large window looking into the adjacent churchyard, where Nathan Coley’s new artwork broadcasts: The Same for Everyone. Another new view has been opened on the opposite side of the stair, linking this complex to the spires of nearby churches and college chapels. [image19] There is a sympathetic use of wood (lovely hand-turned handrails throughout), and tasteful shop fittings that echo the simple domestic shelving and dinin…
… as always there were negative voices), in Sydney RICHARD Grayson's (The World May Be Fantastic) was equally successful. Born in England, Grayson had run the Experimental Art Foundation in Adelaide for many years, and became the first practising artist to curate a Sydney Biennale, with assistance in the formative stages from an advisory panel consisting of Ralph Rugoff based in California, American-born, London-based Susan Hiller and Janos Sugar from Budapest. The exhibition's title helps convey its premise: Fictions Fakes Fabrications Models Miniatures Hypotheses Conspiracy theories. It did not propose that people look seriously at what was happening politically in this country, nor did it present the audience with the views of those who had been ill-treated here. But this was never its intention, and it was conceived well before the 'fictitious' refugee children overboard saga that helped return the Howard government to power, as well as September 11. What, however, the two quite dif…


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