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Anj Smith at Hauser & Wirth London, 18 Spetember 2015. Photograph: Martin Kennedy. …ch vanitas painters to so-called outsider artists RICHARD Dadd and Adolf Wölfli. While acknowledging the importance of recognising where she is coming from and taking responsibility for her references, Smith is also at pains to make work that is of our time. The intricate detail, painted with single-hair brushes – stubble on a figure’s cheek, a moth hidden in the stonework, translucent veins beneath the skin – is like a reward system, whereby the viewer benefits from each further minute spent studying the work and experiences a different painting, depending on the perspective from which it is approached. Smith’s work can only be fully appreciated in the flesh and this is a valiant display well worth spending some time with. Anj Smith: Phosphor on the Palms Hauser & Wirth, South Gallery, London 22 September – 21 November 2015 Interview by ANNA McNAY Filmed by MARTIN KENNEDY…
A young man in curlers at home on West 20th Street, N.Y.C. 1966. Copyright © 1972 The Estate of Diane Arbus, LLC … concept of 'the decisive moment' in photography. RICHARD Avedon continued with a tradition of portraiture that brought out the interior life of both politicians and wanderers; Nan Goldin photographed sexual relationships in The Ballad of Sexual Dependency; and, today, Ryan McGinley creates images of New York City youth culture. In its presentation of photographer and photographs, 'Revelations' has reopened and reassessed many of the difficulties surrounding Diane Arbus while celebrating and recognising an impressive and massive collection of work.   Doro Globus   References 1. This statement appeared on the margin of a letter from Diane Arbus to her friend, Marvin Israel. Sussman E, Arbus D. A Chronology. In: Diane Arbus: Revelations. London: Jonathan Cape, 2003: 145. 2. Kramer H. From Fashion to Freaks. The New York Times. 5 November, 1972. 3. Sontag S. On Photography. London: Penguin Books, 1977: 36. 4. Greer G. Wrestling with Diane Arbus. The Guardian, 8 October, 20…
Kate Whiteford. Tree Optic and Punctuation Series, (After Capability Brown), 2016. Installation view. …ert Smithson [1938-1973], the British land artist RICHARD Long [b1945], and the Scottish poet, writer, artist and gardener, Ian Hamilton Finlay [1925-2006]. How did you come to depart from a studio-based practice and move in to the wider world? KW: The experience of going to locate works in situ in Italy as a student and later working with archaeologists at sites in Scotland and Europe influenced my thinking, and gradually my working practice moved beyond the studio. Also, when I left the Glasgow School of Art, I was part of an artists’ group that proposed monumental artworks for the city. With hindsight, I realise that the scale of these ambitious projects were somehow connected with the loss of heavy industry and shipbuilding. The scale of that thinking impressed me and stayed with me. At the Venice Biennale in 1990, I had no hesitation in casting a land drawing in situ in the Giardini, filling a space double the size of most pavilions. JMcK: Your watercolour works in this ex…
Marina Abramović. Art must be beautiful/Artist must be beautiful, 1975. Black and white video with sound,
13 min 51 sec. © Marina Abramović; Courtesy Lisson Gallery. …;s As It Presents Itself, with the voice of actor RICHARD Briers in a one-way conversation (asking us, the audience) what performance is and what it is not. The clay animation figures represent the comedian Spike Milligan, curator Matthew Higgs, the artist’s mother, Mrs Frances Gander, and the Lumière brothers (dressed in brown tweed suits, they could be mistaken for the performance duo Gilbert and George). The experience of watching As It Presents Itself reminded me of the habit of reading street signs out loud. Drawn in to the performance, I felt compelled to answer the series of questions posed by the voiceover, if for nothing else than to quiet the voice. Santiago Sierra, in his work The Trap, Matucana 100, Santiago de Chile, December 2007 (2007), places an audience at the centre of his performance, thus literally bringing into play Carlos’s concept that the other’s role as witness / responder is actually in itself a crucial and “performing” com…
Studio International, Vol 177, No 909, March 1969. …ify the behaviour of the machine has been used by RICHARD Hogle and several others. The point is that Tsai knows his sophisticated techniques so well that the ingenuity has been put behind him and become a taken-for-granted skill or medium—like handwriting for others. As can be seen from the biographical note which follows this article, a great deal of specialized experience and research has gone into these creations; yet they look effortless and spontaneous, as if the artist's co-ordination of his technical resources were indissoluble from the coordination of his own instincts and intelligence. This power to co-ordinate and organize is, of course, one traditionally associated with the artist. Where it is lacking the result seems not 'art' but a contrivance—willed by the mind, with no concurrence of the nerves and instinct. Faced by such objects, we find ourselves commenting on the technical skill that has gone into them. Faced by a Tsai, one recovers a primitive and naive wonder …
Yayoi Kusama with net painting and skyline in New York, c1961. …ama held Driving Image Show, an exhibition at the RICHARD Castellane Gallery in New York. It featured a dense assemblage of her newest form: white, phallic, fabric protuberances clustered on to furniture – chairs, ladders, ironing boards – and known as Accumulation sculptures. On the floor, for the viewer to tread on with a crunch, was dried macaroni. In the poster for this show, repeated images of Kusama’s disembodied face hang over the scene, merging into the space. She has always described her main inspirations as her own visions and psychology, and has written of a hallucination – triggered by the energy expended on making them – in which her body merged into one of her Infinity Nets. The idea of self-obliteration imbues her self-presentation within her own work – brushing her hair performatively in a video interview in her studio, holding up a home-made dress to hide her body; lying back, dressed in yellow, in a field of sunflowers; or spread-eagled naked against one o…
Goldsmiths Centre For Contemporary Art, entrance view. Image courtesy of Assemble. …re extraordinary - like galleries carved out of a RICHARD Serra sculpture. The cast-iron interior of the main one has been cleaned, oiled, preserved and strengthened to resist wind-load. It can, of course, be painted any colour, but for now it is black and raw, the perfect setting for Mika Rottenberg’s Frying Pans (2018) which intermittently hiss and steam, their vapours captured by shafts of light from a long, clerestory window. The top level of this space has been lined with timber, darkened to a similar gritty texture as the metal panels by using Assemble’s home-brewed acetate tincture of wire wool dissolved in vinegar. Another cast-iron tank around the corner has had its lid sliced off to create a small rooftop sculpture terrace; it is also lined with timbers painted in this sticky, briny-looking residue. The other two galleries contrast nicely: top-lit, white-cube-style galleries. [image14] Adam Willis of Assemble says their scheme “offers a series of very diverse and dist…
Dangerous Women: The Perils of Muses and Femmes Fatales …inine seduction. Recounting Scheherazade's story, RICHARD Burton in The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night describes her enchantment of the king of Persia with her creative and intellectual talents, thereby saving her life. While creative pursuits for women have been tolerated (and sometimes encouraged) by men, most often men have cautioned women against developing their intellect. Of course, this is one of the most frustrating sexual hypocrisies; men champion intellect and reason as a guard against passion but warn women that a strong mind will dilute feminine charms.4 In 'Emancipation and Transgression in Love', Adler and Lécosse address a further frustration. Traditionally, many women have identified femininity as primary weapon in the war of the sexes, leaving less-effective passive aggression to the shrew. Courageously, certain women, real and imaginary, have left the battlefield, refusing to define themselves in male terms. Some of them appear in this se…
Laszlo Fejes. <em>Wedding, Budapest,</em> 1965. Silver gelatin print, 155 x 238 mm. Hungarian Museum of Photography. Copyright Hungarian Museum of Photography. … bear witness. References 1. Cornell Capa & RICHARD Whelan(ed.s) Children of War, Children of Peace. Photographs by Robert Capa. Bulfinch Press, 1991: xii. 2. Rudolf Balogh, 1914, quoted in the catalogue to the exhibition, Eyewitness: Hungarian Photography in the Twentieth Century. Brassaï, Capa, Kertész, Moholy-Nagy, Munkácsi, Thames & Hudson Ltd, 2011: 42. 3. John Steinbeck “Robert Capa: A Memorial Portfolio” in Popular Photography, September 1954. 4. Quoted in John Banville, “Eternity in a Moment”, in RA Magazine Summer 2011, issue number 111. 5. André Kertész, quoted on exhibition wall text. 6. André Kertész. Edited by Harold Riley. The Manchester Collection, 1984: 75.…
Jerzy Ryszard (Jurry) Zielinski. Bez Buntu (Without Rebellion), 1970. Private collection, courtesy Luxembourg & Dayan. © the Estate of the artist. …R Jasper Johns (b1930), Claes Oldenburg (b1929), RICHARD Hamilton (1922-2011), Robert Rauschenberg (1925-2008), Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997) and Andy Warhol (1928-1987). Sound familiar? These are artists whose work you will categorically not see in the latest homage to pop art at the Tate Modern. For years now, art history books have dedicated page after page to them whenever the topic of pop art crops up. The critical discourse on the movement has often fallen too easily into a Gombrich-esque linear discussion. Another erroneous perception of the movement – largely due to it being attributed to the US and Britain – is that its main focus was consumerism. Pop art had, in fact, provided artists from all over the world with a vehicle to hold up a mirror to the troubles they were facing in their own countries in a clear and powerful way. For most countries at the time, consumerism just wasn’t up there on the list of pressing issues. Instead, issues such as censorship, social imbala…
James Stuart and Nicholas Revett. <em>Antiquities of Athens</em>, volume 1. London: John Haberkorn, 1762. Open to title page. Courtesy of the Library, The Bard Graduate Centre for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design and Culture, New York …ition continues until 24 June 2007. RICHARD Carr …
Jessica Stockholder. Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, NY. …rank Stella, Gordon Matta-Clark, Kurt Schwitters, RICHARD Serra, Donald Judd, Emily Carr, Robert Davidson, Susan Point, Rebecca Morris … I also love Cheryl Donegan and Tauba Auerbach’s work. NK: In one of the early texts about you, the art critic Barry Schwabsky remarked that your work “dissolves aggression”. He compared it to Happenings, which, as Susan Sontag described, played with aggression as a tool, setting up the audience as its object.2 I like this observation because I find that it may ring true. How do you interpret it? JS: My work is aggressive in relation to the categories of understanding that we are all equipped with, but at the same time inviting, as it proposes that pleasure and sensuality are important. And it is aggressive in various concrete ways – when it cuts through walls or falls out of a frame, when it’s in your way. The work is gentler in pictures and more challenging in person, because images don’t capture the difficulty of making sense as one …
Léo Caillard, from the series Hipsters in Stone, 2013. Photograph courtesy Sebastien Adrien Gallery – Paris. …ainted, reciting the biographies of these women. RICHARD Tuschman (b1956), an artist from the US, shifts the witty semantics of artists such as Golz and Caillard to a more meditative tone. Several works have been selected from Tuschman’s series Hopper Meditations (2012-13) for this exhibition at MOCAK. The series is a response to the work of the American painter Edward Hopper, and also reflects the Wall Street Crash of 1929 and the devastating social and political situation that followed. “Placing one or two figures in humble, intimate settings, he created quiet scenes that are psychologically compelling with open-ended narratives,” Tuschman has said of Hopper. The images for Hopper Meditations are composed using photomontage – the background is made up of miniature models constructed by the artist. They capture domestic scenes of solitary individuals or couples in pensive poses: reading in an armchair, working at a desk, staring out of the window, draped across the bed. They …
Tim Rollins and KOS. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Asleep on the Raft (after Mark Twain), 2013-14. Indigo watercolour, matte acrylic, book pages on canvas. Photograph: Christopher Burke. Courtesy of the artist, SCAD and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York and Hong Kong. …her King and for Paulo Freire and Cornel West and RICHARD Rorty, WEB Dubois and Julia Kristeva, Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, and especially Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. But I’m also New England to the bone, raised on Emerson, Thoreau and transcendentalism, on William James and American pragmatism and varieties of religious experiences. LW: And Angel, Rick, were you critical of Tim at the time? AA: There aren’t more honest critics than kids, especially from the South Bronx. Tim demanded excellence and mutual respect, and we responded to that. RS: Tim wasn’t patronising. I met him at a summer programme at a Lehman College workshop. He gave us drawing pads and said do whatever you want. TR: We interviewed all these kids for the workshop. It’s called creaming, to take all the goody-goodies, who won’t upset the programme. And there was Rick and his friend George Garces drawing caricatures of the others. I saw them drawing and I looked at the caricatures and they wer…
Studio International, Vol 180, No 928, December 1970, pages 229-230. …ness of the script and of the character played by RICHARD Harris, this film will surely keep a classical status. As a French critic wrote, ‘...ce que surtout Antonioni met en question, c'est l'habitabilité même du monde.' (Maurice Pons, Les Temps Moderns, December 1964). ECOGAME The Computer 70 exhibition at Olympia in October was not the first trade exhibition to have included an art contribution as the centrepiece. The idea seems a good one, and could become a traditional medium of pat­ronage. Such occasions involve the exchange of large sums of money, so that the costs of financing the art contribution (whatever it may be) can be absorbed. The bulk of such exhibitions can be very tedious, and they provide an opportunity to interest intelligent people who may for various reasons profess little care for artistic matters. Commissioning by the organizers of a trade exhibition has some advantages over commissioning by an individual firm, which is usually done through its public …
Leon Levinstein. <em>Untitled</em>, New York City, 1960s–70s. Gelatin silver print, 34.9 x 27.4 cm. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Gary Davis, 2007. …He was associated, at the time, with Diane Arbus, RICHARD Avendon and Robert Frank – and was very much an important figure in that group, despite relatively limited commercial success and outside exposure. He photographed the regular people on the street, but few outside of the art world would have recognised him, and he remained until his death rather more of a photographers’ photographer. That the Met now invites rather a lot of attention to Levinstein's worthy collection of work is a cause for celebration. Levinstein's work marks a time before photography became such a commercial endeavor, and captures a city before it swayed that way also. We are shown a candor that is rare in modern photography, and we leave the exhibition with these images and brief encounters lingering – almost surprised that such a chance encounter with a bunch of strangers can indeed be so comforting. …
Studio International, Vol 181, No 930, February 1971. …George, Daniel Buren, Ger van Elk, Keith Sonnier, RICHARD Serra, Lawrence Weiner. These will be shown continuously without breaks, editing etc. after the interview with Schum. [An article on Gerry Schum's work was included in the January issue of Studio International.] Programme 5: Concept Victor Burgin has prepared a script for this programme. It is not yet known what form the programme will take.  …
Judith Wechsler. Aby Warburg: Metamorphosis and Memory, 2016 (film still). 60 min. …harles. ARC: You’ve also collaborated with RICHARD Leacock, one of the godfathers of direct cinema, along with DA Pennebaker, Robert Drew and Albert Maysles. Did that kind of observational cinema affect your film-making? JW: Ricky Leacock was an innovative, perceptive and generous film-maker. We were colleagues at MIT and had become friends. I asked if he would work with me on a modest film I was making on three American painters living in Paris: Biala, Zuka and Shirley Jaffe. And then again, a few years later, for a film about another painter who was a mutual friend, Flora Natapoff, filming in London and Umbria. Ricky was a brilliant cameraman, capturing more than first meets the eye. He had a way of disappearing behind the camera so the subject forgot about his presence. Ricky believed you should make films without encumbrances – just do it. From him, I learned to make films with minimal means. That’s what I’ve done in my last three films and my current film…
Nance Ackerman. <em>Mina Tuckatuck Weetaltuk</em>, 1992. Courtesy McCord Museum, Montreal. …al with New York on Inuit and Cree treaty lands. (RICHARD Tardif ‘Epic Journey of the Odeyak Celebrates 20 Years’ in Nation News May 2010.) Another image, taken in Kanehsatake Quebec in 1994, shows Wathahine (Mary) Nicholas, Mohawk language educator. (Wathahine is Mohawk for On a Long Journey). The accompanying text reads: “Following the Oka crisis of 1990, an armed stand off involving Mohawk warriors, The Quebec police and Canadian army, Wathahine decided to start a Mohawk language school … to help bring the youth of her community back to their language and culture.” In our contemporary and culturally mixed world we have all experienced urban environments, where restless, disenfranchised and culturally dislocated youth would benefit immensely from the work of such a woman.  As Kanahstatsi (Nancy) (Kanehsatake, Quebec 1995) Mohawk educator tells us, “If women were running this here, it would be different. Clan mothers …
George Barbier: The Birth of Art Deco …ture, 16th-century European arts and fashions and RICHARD Wagner's operas. For Barbier, historical and exotic sources were framed by a love of 18th-century European opulence. In the 1960s, well after Barbier's career ended with his death in 1932 at the age of 50, the term “Art Deco” came into circulation with the Deco revival. Collector interest at the time surged, with Barbier's name becoming inextricably linked to his charmingly decorated fashion plates. Frequently, Barbier's own clothing and jewellery designs adorned the slender female figures in these illustrations. He placed them in luxurious settings that demonstrate his interior design skills and acute perception of elite society ideals. With voracious collector appetites growing from the 1960s to today, plates from books and magazines have been sold piecemeal without regard to the integrity of the whole. Barbier's fashionable images may have been reproduced many times over in novelty items (calendars, postcards, etc), but …
Obelisk by John Makepeace. …p;  25 September–20 November 2011 by RICHARD CARR The exhibition, John Makepeace: Enriching the Language of Furniture, at the Collins Gallery in Glasgow, presents a unique insight into a the work of a man who has been designing and making furniture since the days when he studied under a Dorsetshire cabinetmaker, Keith Cooper, in the late 1950s. Later on, Makepeace built his own reputation by establishing a creative community at Farnborough Barn near Banbury, Oxfordshire – a period also notable for the contribution made by his former wife, the designer/weaver, Ann Sutton – before moving to Parnham, an Elizabethan mansion in Dorset. Here, he established his own residential school for Craftsmanship in Wood in 1977, with ten students as his first enrolment. As Jeremy Myerson has said, it was here that Makepeace “pioneered research into woodland design, manufacture and management” by extending his activities into the neighbouring Hooke Park. This enabled him to examin…
Lee Lozano. No title, c1962. Oil on board, 7 x 8.3 cm. © The Estate of Lee Lozano. Courtesy the Estate and Hauser & Wirth. …zano swiftly joined the SoHo scene centred around RICHARD Bellamy’s short-lived Green Gallery and practitioners such as Donald Judd, Sol LeWitt and Carl Andre. The paintings in c 1962 constitute the first stage of her mature career; midway through the decade in which she switched to minimalism. Her Waves, a series of paintings modelled on electromagnetic waves, were painstakingly created in sessions that could last several exhausting days – a different type of extremism to that displayed in her genitalia-filled miniatures. By 1968, Lozano had started to become disillusioned with the art industry, and switched to conceptual work that critiqued or disregarded it. One piece saw her throw the previous 10 issues of Artforum in the air, while another involved her listening to a radio during a panel discussion. She also pushed her health to the limits: one enactment saw her spend a month ingesting a tab of LSD each day. Her final opuses, written as ideas in her notebook, were Decide to B…
Jules Feiffer. <em>A True Leader</em>, 1982. Ink on paper. 11 1/2 x 14 ½ in. Courtesy Adam Baumgold Gallery, NY. … with his relentless attack on political follies. RICHARD Nixon and, later, Ronald Reagan were favourite targets. These presidents provided ample material for Feiffer's barbed wit. 'Dick-N-Pat-Outlaw Football' (1970), 'Now We Come to the Media' (1973) and 'Would You Buy a Used Country From This Man?' (1973) could serve as iconic images of an era. These images, like the Reagan-inspired 'The United Disney of America' (1984), are both funny and sad for they are caricatures of caricatures, one perceptive commentator's expression of a truth. When he turned his mind - and pen - to romantic relationships, Feiffer portrayed the complex and confusing rollercoaster ride of expectation and desire with a few broad strokes: self-absorption ('Me. Me. Me. Me ...' ,1972), insecurity ('I Have No Friends', 1972), and the unfathomable laws of attraction ('You Really Turn Me On', 1972). Feiffer excels with family dynamics, particularly with his astute awareness of children's in…
Marino Auriti. Il Enciclopedico Palazzo del Mondo (The Encyclopaedic Palace of the World). At 11 feet high, the model’s 1:200 scale would translate to half a mile high. Photograph: Dorothy Feaver. …ntries this year reveals many notes on inclusion. RICHARD Mosse tried to surmount the limitations of photojournalism by spending a year on the inside of the Democratic Republic of Congo, embedded within armed rebel groups. He shot the resulting film The Enclave with incredibly scarce infrared 16mm film, normally used by the military for night vision, and which in daylight turns all greens red. Multiple screens are dispersed throughout the darkened interior of the Irish Pavilion, offering no single viewpoint. One might show a bumpy track dropping into cavernous – cerise – valleys; children hold scythes; dead bodies lie in grass pink as candyfloss; a mint green river snakes ahead; figures run down paths into a camp for the internally displaced. The soundtrack by Ben Frost is the unifying factor, incorporating the boom of gunshots, cries and insect chirrups within a weft of ambient noise. Portugal – usually a pavilion that’s off the beaten track – is this time docked right on t…
James Turrell. Aten Reign, 2013. Daylight and LED light, dimensions variable. © James Turrell. Installation view. Photograph: David Heald © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York. …w you only five). “We’ll have to fix that,” RICHARD Armstrong told me ruefully. Well, yes, but how?) No matter,because the main event is all. Lie or stand at its centre and you will be enveloped by Turrell light. The experience of its bleeding all around you through every gradation of a waking day is less one of immersion than suffusion. Inversion pertains, too. Just as you watch the fairytale pink of rising dawn impregnate your white shirt, you feel it seep into your pores. Just as you surrender your “self” to the silver grey of dusk, you feel sucked into its vortex. Is the experience diluted by the crowds? Well, of course. But there is no option but to brave them. Should you not able to experience Roden Crater (thus far by invitation only) this show may be your last chance to see a powerful work by Turrell. Such an effort will not be repeated any time soon by a museum, nor may the force be with Turrell two decades on. Fortunate enough to have entered the piece in its grey …


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