logo studio international
Search
 
Results
Total: 376 results found.
Sir William Lyons, Malcolm Sayer, William M. Heynes. E-Type Roadster, 1961. Jaguar Ltd, Coventry, England. Steel body, 48 x 66 x 176 in (121.9 x 167.6 x 447 cm). Gift of Jaguar Cars. Photograph: Jill Spalding. …er of the era’s idols, all notably American – RICHARD Serra, Eva Hesse, Andy Warhol, Cy Twombly, Jasper Johns and Ed Ruscha – and all of whom straddled the decade) with Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg and Johns crowned to bookend the show. Given that little besides the dateline connects Louis Kahn’s unrealised cardboard study for an assembly building in Bangladesh with Claes Oldenburg’s soft sculptured ice-cream cone and Niki de Saint Phalle’s mixed media on wood,  grouping by year seems to function primarily as an organising mechanism, marking curatorial choice as more precisely the point. The fact that curators were recruited from all six departments (many quite young, with fresh energy and ideas) negates the horse-into-camel disdain for decision by committee, and makes a strong case going forward for the merits of interdisciplinary show-making. As with the ticket pulled from a hat, the artworks making the cut determined the winners, or in this case the dialogue. Given…
‘Death valley’ from ‘Destricted’. Director: Sam Taylor-Wood …arney, Marco Brambilla, Larry Clark, Gaspar Noé, RICHARD Prince and Sam Taylor-Wood The creators of 'Destricted' describe the production as a set of 'explicit films'. The seven short films that make up 'Destricted' are, in fact, about sex, but the term 'explicit' should be understood in a specific sense: each short was conceived and directed by a controversial name in the contemporary visual arts scene and is an artistic interpretation of pornography, not merely showing sexual acts but showing sex in a particular way and presenting sexual relations as performances. Of the seven 'directors', whose previous works bear some relation to the filmed branch of the visual arts, only two of them can be called 'filmmakers' in the traditional sense of the word: the American Larry Clark (b. 1943), who is best known for 'Kids' and 'Ken Park', and the French-Argentine Gaspar Noé (b. 1963), who created the polemic French film 'Irreversible'. Throughout their careers, both artists have dealt with …
Sidney Nolan. <em>Temptation of St Anthony,</em> 1952. Oil and enamel on hardboard, 121.8 x 91.3 cm. Collection National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. © The Trustees of the Sidney Nolan Trust …s there, returning to Melbourne in February 1944. RICHARD Haese concurs with McCaughey on the importance of the Wimmera experience on Nolan's art and on Australian art. Nolan had been committed to art for four years, an art that was more diverse, puzzling and capricious - and sophisticated in its intellectual concerns - than any of his contemporaries. The two years of the Wimmera period were to prove crucial to Nolan and his art. In these years we see for the first time Nolan reaching his full powers as an artist and confronting the full challenge of the realities of landscape and the innovations of modernism. The result was a period of development more dense and concentrated than at any other time in his career; the consequences were far reaching for Nolan and for the history of Australian painting.6 Nolan brought to his experience of the Wimmera landscape the lessons of late nineteenth-century European art and early twentieth-century art. His own interpret…
… in 1953. However, as Dyson made clear in the RICHARD Dimbleby lecture he gave on BBC1 in December 2004, he resigned not because of the Spry exhibition, but because he believed that the Design Museum was failing in its remit (established when it was founded by Sir Terence Conran in 1989) to focus primarily on the manufactured object. He described an interview - conducted with English florists on the BBC's radio programme, Today - about his resignation. After the florists had made proclamations about the life-enhancing properties of lilacs, the interviewer asked them whether or not they thought that flower design is as important - or even the same - as designing an aeroplane. They replied in the affirmative and Dyson states that this convinced him that his decision to resign had been correct. …
David Hockney. The Room Tarzana, 1967. Acrylic on canvas, 243.8 x 243.8 cm. © David Hockney. …tream, David Hockney, Lucian Freud, Leon Kossoff, RICHARD Hamilton and Euan Uglow – in such loose-fitting terms does little justice to the subtler, more intricate dialogues operating among these artists and their work since the 1940s. In this exhibition Haunch of Venison attempts to excavate these specific connections, whether historical, aesthetic or technical, using the conceptual apparatus provided by one of the artists themselves: Francis Bacon’s description of painting as a means of capturing form and sensation as it emerges and disappears. For Bacon, and for the show’s curator Catherine Lampert, each of these ten artists uses paint to address the essential question: “How can this thing be made so that you catch the mystery of appearance within the mystery of the making?’ The question of how painting, and representation in general, can make objects, ideas or impressions come into being can hardly be considered specific to these artists’ time. Yet by the 1…
Jacob van Ruisdael. <em>View of Egmond aan Zee with a Blasted Elm</em>, 1648. Oil on panel, 65.09 x 49.85 cm. Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, NH Museum Purchase Currier Funds. 1950. Photo Jeff Nintzel. …creasingly, and especially since the land artists RICHARD Serra and the late Robert Smithson, as well as the English land artist RICHARD Long, we have come to view 'landskip' in a wholly different way. The Picturesque, indeed, was, itself, something to be abhorred by these artists, and they took evasive action against ever being so represented. Now, the aesthetic of the Sublime has exhibited a renewed currency, more readily transferable into land art and installation art. We could say that it all began with the 'landskips' of Jacob van Ruisdael. Michael Spens …
Frida Escobedo’s Serpentine Pavilion 2018. Photograph: Iwan Baan. …n Nouvel abutted by skyscrapers from Renzo Piano, RICHARD Rogers, Norman Foster and Rafael Viñoly. [image5] But as resistance to the tenets and aesthetics of modernism recede, there are other, subtler qualities of contemporary architectural practice that still have need of a platform. In fact, the more crammed with status skyscrapers London gets, the more we need pavilions in the vein of last year’s simple, light-touch, tree-like structure by the Burkina Faso and Berlin-based architect Francis Kéré and this year’s gentle sequence of perforated screens by Mexican born and based architect Frida Escobedo (b1979). [image9] Escobedo has gone for the cheapest of materials – concrete roof tiles, easily sourced and replicated. British made, these pleasingly rough-edged, dark grey, crenellated forms are stacked on thin steel bars, creating something very like the traditional like the traditional, lattice-like, patterned blocks you find everywhere in Mexico called Celosías. [image…
Georg Baselitz. Mann am Baum abwärts (Man on a Tree Downwards), 1968/69. Charcoal on paper. Presented to the British Museum by Count Christian Duerckheim. Reproduced by permission of the artist. © Georg Baselitz. …wings that wouldn’t look out of place alongside RICHARD Hamilton. Palermo, whose pseudonym comes from an American boxing manager and gangster, was close friends with Polke and Richter when they were studying in Düsseldorf. His work, the most abstract of them all, and more aligned with developments in the USA, comprises simple screen prints of basic shapes and forms, stretched canvases and painted wood. Sadly, Palermo died young, from a heroin overdose, at the age of 33. Finally, the Richter section of the exhibition contains a great many sketches in pencil, ballpoint pen and felt tip, alongside his first ever watercolours, made in a hotel room in Davos, Switzerland, on 2 January 1978. Some are studies for full works, others exercises in abstract mark-making, and some are just notes and ideas. A sheet from Atlas (1962-89) comprises 25 colour photographs and, to accompany this, there are enchanting displays of magazine cuttings depicting clouds, lakes and mountains – as inspiring …
Co-curator Sam Cornish explains the thought process behind Kaleidoscope: Colour and Sequence in 1960s British Art. Photograph: Martin Kennedy. …ss Jaray, Phillip King, Bridget Riley, Tim Scott, RICHARD Smith and William Turnbull. Kaleidoscope: Colour and Sequence in 1960s British Art travels to: • Djanogly Gallery, Nottingham Lakeside Arts, The University of Nottingham, 15 July – 24 September. • Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre, University of Warwick, 5 October – 9 December 2017 • Walker Art Gallery, National Museums Liverpool, 24 February – 3 June 2018. Interview by ALEXANDER GLOVER Filmed by MARTIN KENNEDY…
Louisa Fairclough. A Rose, 2017. 1 x 16mm film looped (colour, silent, 9 min) projected onto a suspended acrylic screen, 1 x performance for a field recording pressed onto dubplate vinyl (20 min). Installation view: A Song cycle for the Ruins of a Psychiatric Unit, Danielle Arnaud Gallery, 2017. Photograph: Oskar Proctor. Courtesy the artist and Danielle Arnaud. …an abstracted musical score, Fairclough, composer RICHARD Glover and musician George McKenzie arranged and recorded a series of glissandi (slides in pitch) on the site of a derelict psychiatric hospital. Singer Samuel Middleton chanted the words “fear, life, death, hope” one after the other, with each word assigned a different starting pitch. As he sang, his voice was taped on a reel-to-reel recorder, while speakers played the recording back into the room, building sound, layer on layer. Fairclough produced four tape loops, which were subsequently transposed on to 16mm film. In the gallery, the four films are played simultaneously on four projectors and their speakers. Because the film was exposed with no image (blank, except for the sound) the projector emits little light and the room is shrouded in darkness. As the eyes adjust, visitors see reels of film racing from the projectors on the floor to what appear to be shiny meat hooks hanging from the ceiling, criss-crossing the room…
Martin John Callanan. A Planetary Order (Terrestrial Cloud Globe), 2009. 3D digital print. © Martin John Callanan 2018. Courtesy Parafin, London. … Faithfull, Rebecca Partridge, Katie Paterson and RICHARD T Walker. [image7] Whereas the museum space within an institution perhaps offers a greater degree of curatorial freedom, the commercial gallery setting means that this outing is tightly focused. This show has been entirely curated by Partridge, who says the selection of artists has been finely tuned as the trilogy has unfolded – the previous exhibitions had other artists, too. This chapter features Partridge’s beautifully painted sky studies, alongside a 3D digital print of a globe by Callanan, landscape prints by Walker, and text pieces, a light-filled installation and a candle by Paterson. Finally, there is an excellent pairing of films by Faithfull and Walker. [image2] The multidisciplinarity of pieces by this quintet is important to the curator, who says this concept focuses on meta-narratives. The sense of flux in artworks that oscillate between being emotional and romantic, on the one hand, and objective and reason…
John Constable. A windmill near Brighton, 1824. Oil on canvas. Lent by Tate: Bequeathed by George Salting, 1910. …d to Mrs Constable at this very address. In 2013, RICHARD Constable, the great-great-grandson of the artist, unveiled a blue plaque on the house. Sadly, having died in 2015, he is no longer around to enjoy this enlightening, thoroughly researched and scholarly significant exhibition co-curated by Harrap, showcasing more than 60 sketches, drawings and paintings made by Constable during those years, many in the “painting room” he created at Sober’s Gardens – now Harrap’s own studio – at the time doubling up as a bedroom for the cook, Mrs Inskip. The exhibition is structured around three walks that Constable would regularly make: westwards towards Shoreham Bay, northwards towards Devil’s Dyke, and eastwards to the Chain Pier. Largely eschewing the town centre, he would systematically follow these routes, stopping to make sequential sketches along the way. A single sketch would take him approximately two hours (as we are informed by notes on the b…
Brook Andrew, SPIN, installation view, Tolarno Gallery, Melbourne, 6 April - 20 May 2017. …s year. Reference 1. Susan Hiller interviewed by RICHARD Grayson for Talking Art at Tate Modern, London, 14 June  2008. • Brook Andrew: The Right to Offend is Sacred is at the National Gallery of Victoria, Australia, until 4 June 2017; Spin is at Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne, until 20 May 2017.…
Martin KIPPENBERGER, 'Self Portrait', 1988. Oil on canvas, 200 x 240 
        cm. Copyright Saatchi Gallery … LeWitt, Frank Stella, Dan Flavin, Anselm Kiefer, RICHARD Serra, Philip Guston and Sigmar Polke. The impressive list continues, making Saatchi not only a discerning collector but an individual responsible for elevating the profile of contemporary art and encouraging other collectors to choose 'contemporary art rather than racehorses, vintage cars, jewellery or yachts.'8 If we believe that Charles Saatchi is announcing that painting is alive after a critical hiatus, we might be irritated by the apparently dominant role of money over integrity. But Saatchi is not making such a claim. In fact, he is critical of curators and commentators in the art world in determining trends in art. In a recent interview he stated: The familiar grind of seventies conceptualist retreads, the dry as dust photo and text panels, the production line of banal and impenetrable installations, the hushed and darkened rooms with their interchangeable flickering videos are the hallmarks of a decade of numbing righ…
Andy Goldsworthy. <em>Clay Room</em>, 2007. Clay dug from grounds of Yorkshire Sculpture Park, dried, sieved and mixed with human hair. Reconstituted and applied to gallery walls. Many participants. Photo: Jonty Wilde. …atural process of catastrophe and redemption'. Of RICHARD Long's 'A Line Made by Walking' (l967), a simple brush with nature rather than an airbrushing in of appropriate natural elements, Andy Goldsworthy says he was impressed from student days. But he was in no way non-plussed, and his work has taken a different direction. Soon Goldsworthy was co-opting gallery space, the artist as the collaborator where the process was natural. In l998 came a major move forward by Goldsworthy, when he completed the 'Storm King Wall' in the Hudson Valley. He had fortuitously found an old dry stone wall, well overgrown by nature and partly hidden, and he decided to make this his sculpture, all 2,278 feet of dry stone line. It was also rebuilt by wall makers brought over from the north of England. The completed wall line emerges from a surrounding swathe of woodland and then snakes dramatically down the hill, into a pond, finally resurfacing, climbing the opposite bank and so straightening out. The Yor…
Kaye Donachie. Our tears for smiles, 2018. Oil on linen. © Kaye Donachie. Courtesy Maureen Paley, London. …by Cornelius Nuie of Sackville-West’s ancestors RICHARD and Edward Sackville, used in the book to depict Orlando as a boy. At the far end of the gallery is a painting by an unknown artist from the early 19th century, found by Woolf and Sackville-West in an antique shop in nearby Lewes and used to illustrate Orlando’s lover, Marmaduke Bonthrop Shelmerdine, Esquire. [image3] Alongside these historical gems, contemporary artworks are dotted about, in an attempt to show Orlando’s relevance today. Among them are Our Tears for Smiles and The Eclipse That Settled (both 2018), two gorgeous oil-on-linen portraits of ghostly women by Kaye Donachie; some garishly coloured embroideries by Matt Smith, based on 18th-century patterns, in which the faces of the subjects have been left blank; and a small selection of photographer Zanele Muholi’s black-and-white portraits of trans, non-binary and lesbian South Africans from the series Faces and Phases. (A larger selection from the series has b…
Renzo Piano, The Shard: A View from St Thomas Street, 2018. © RPBW. …de his name and that of his then business partner RICHARD Rogers, he was experimenting with prefabrication and modular construction, along with his older brother and father (Piano came from a family of builders, Fratelli Piano). It is pleasing to read here that the high priest of modular experimentation, and one of Piano’s heroes, Jean Prouvé, ended up giving him that big break – he was one of the jurors for the Pompidou competition. [image3] Piano’s particular experimental yet crafted aesthetic came to attention early on. Having qualified at the Milan Polytechnic, he worked for Louis Kahn in Philadelphia, and then for the Polish engineer Zygmunt Stanislaw Makowski in London. His early ideas and schemes were exhibited at London’s Architectural Association in 1969, causing the editor of Architectural Design to single him out - in an article exhibited here – comparing him to Mies van der Rohe and Pier Luigi Nervi for the extremes to which he was willing to push his architect…
Anthony Van Dyck. <em>Portrait of Mary Hill, Lady Killigrew</em>,  1638.
    Oil on canvas …ly substantiated the image of John Lennon, as did RICHARD Hamilton commemorate his Marilyn. There was also a social apparatus conveyed by Van Dyck. He bequeathed the ‘Class Act’ look in England, so notably evident in society even through until the l950s. This ‘cavalier’ pretension pervaded upper and upper-middle class self - imagery even through until the l950s in England. It divided the ‘officer’ classes, bestowing unwarranted superiority on the outmoded cavalry officers. And that assumption even extended into mid-l950s industrial boardrooms, pocket-handkerchiefs flying, until it finally expired. Van Dyck had the English psyche measured, cut and dried long before. This perhaps was his least welcome bequest. Today its origins sit languidly in Tate Britain. Reference 1. Shah Abbas: The Re-Making of Iran, British Museum through 14 June, 2009. …
Studio International, Vol 168, No. 858, October, 1964. …wdry environs. Anthony Caro, Helen Frankenthaler, RICHARD Stankiewicz, Kenneth Noland, Willem de Kooning, Eduardo Paolozzi, Robert Goodnough, Jorge de la Vega— these serious and compelling artists in a wilderness of unseriousness and banality are inevitably rendered ineffectual. On a different level, an international experiment in its fourth year at Fairleigh Dickenson College in New Jersey, flourishes. Founded by Tosun Bayrak, a Turkish painter permanently settled in the United States, the international seminar brings together artists of widely varying origins and backgrounds in an informal situation. They are given studios, materials, room and board and all the free time they need for a six-week period. All that is expected from these painters and sculptors are paintings and sculptures. But en route a great deal more happens. Scarcely an artist has appeared at the seminar who doesn't admit that his concourse with other artists in such close proximity has altered his work. More es…
Imitator of Jean-Siméon CHARDIN, 1699–1779.<strong> </strong><em>Still Life with Bottle, Glass and Loaf, </em>19th century. Oil on canvas, 38.1 x 45.1 cm. Presented by Lord Savile, 1888. © The National Gallery, London. … How do pictorial representations work? What enables us to read a depiction as a representation of an object, a situation or an event? Until the early 20th century, such questions would have seemed, to most people, pointless and hardly worth asking. If pressed for an answer, they might have explained that representations work because they resemble the things they depict. However, with the passage of the century this increasingly appeared to be an unsatisfactory or false answer. Scepticism about the “resemblance theory” of depiction became widespread amongst philosophers, and something of a polemical battleground. Resemblance theorists tried to shore up what looked like a crumbling theoretical position, while sceptics presented seemingly unanswerable challenges to what they regarded as little more than a folk myth. Probably the most articulate and persuasive of the sceptics was the American philosopher Nelson Goodman. His book Languages of Art, first published in 1976, is, arguab…
…e Thirty Years struggle that was vindicated. Sir RICHARD MacCormac has provided an Introduction which succinctly places the entire venture in a design context. Dr Brian Lang provides a longer essay which reviews the longer technological implications of the Library. As the Chief Executive who edged the Library along a subtle path to full realisation, his essay is from the heart and yet adds an appropriate touch of realism to the event. He could be seen at the recent book launch, standing back and yet heaving, metaphorically, an immense sigh of relief. Michael Spens…
Ryan Martin. Optimistic Voices II, 2014. Oil on canvas, 50 x 40 in. Mark Wolfe Contemporary, VOLTA NY. …er was leeched by channelling such been-theres as RICHARD Prince and Tracey Emin. Marrying shine and concept, Thomas Schulte’s gorgeous show of Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle’s Cloud Prototypes. Trending down was art pooled on the floor and dangled from the ceiling (though possibly for fear of accidents and ensuing litigation, since downtown, at the what’s-next satellite fair, Independent, pooled art sucked up the floor space). Minimalism took a back seat to de trop; whole or pieced objects thrown together for cumulative effect lost power in translation from workbench to sculpture and, fronted by Monica Cook’s eviscerated pig at Postmasters Gallery, were the usual 50-shades of kitsch. Much talked about was the dramatic increase in “product”  (the term only marginally less palatable than “stuff” that has come to denote art), which is forcing dealers to accept low-ball offers on work by artists who peaked last season and risk being muscled out by the hot kids coming up. …
Richard Wilson, 20:50, 1987. Installation view at Space Shifters. © copyright the artist, courtesy Hayward Gallery 2018. Photo: Mark Blower. … to the gallery’s brutalist architecture, while RICHARD Wilson’s landmark installation 20:50 (1987) is reprised, filling one of the galleries with impossibly reflective jet-black oil, a gently ascending viewing ramp slicing through the hip-high ooze. [image5] Yayoi Kusama’s Narcissus Garden (1966-2018) fills another gallery with a mirage of polished steel orbs, effervescent in the gallery spotlights, and Anish Kapoor contributes two mind-bending sculptures. These big names and set-piece installations are supplemented with a trove of hallucinatory surprises. [image3] Space Shifters leans heavily on the influence of the light and space movement, a style that emerged from southern California in the late 60s. An offshoot of the decade’s flourishing minimalist art styles, the movement saw artists take up complex technical methods and new materials, such as polyester resin and Plexiglas, borrowed from the engineering and aerospace industries that flourished in and around Los Ange…
…so is not writing about someone he did not know. RICHARD Carr …
Jacques Henri Lartigue, Album 1930, Renée Biarritz, August. Gelatin 
        silver print. Photograph JH Lartigue © Ministère de la Culture-France/A.A.J.H.L. …m of Art in 1963. Then, his friend RICHARD Avedon, helped him put together a book "The Family Album" in 1970 - which placed his name in the first rank of photographic artists. Ironically, the man who had been making incredible images since the age of six, only became a "professional" photographer in his 70s, when commissions from magazines, advertisers and fashion designers began to flood in - culminating in the official photograph of the then President of France, Valerie Giscard d'Estaing. Robert Johnston …


studio international logo
Copyright © 1893–2019 Studio International Foundation.

The title Studio International is the property of the
Studio International Foundation and, together with
the content, are bound by copyright. All rights reserved.
studio international cover 1894
Home About Studio
Archive Yearbooks
Interviews Contributors
Video Cybernetic Serendipity
CyberArt Contact us
twitter facebook RSS feed instagram

Studio International is published by:
the Studio International Foundation, PO Box 1545,
New York, NY 10021-0043, USA