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Romare Bearden, Thank You...§For F.U.M.L. (Funking Up My Life), 
        1978. Collage of various papers with ink and graphite on fiberboard38.1 
        x 46.7 cm (15 x 18 3/8). Donald Byrd © Romare Bearden Foundation 
        / Licensed by VAGA, New York, New York …d studies of major 20th century artists including RICHARD Diebenkorn, Helen Frankenthaler, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, John Martin and Georgia O'Keeffe, is largely responsible for the exhibition. Her work began shortly after Bearden's death in 1988, when his widow, Nanette, approached the National Gallery for advice on the preservation of his work. Fine has written a thorough, scholarly essay for the superb, fully illustrated catalogue, in which she states the importance of Bearden's work: One great legacy of Bearden's art is its insight that what we share as a global community is equal, in both interest and importance, to what makes each of us unique. He achieved this by embracing themes and practices from diverse times and places, and by imbuing them with an imaginative character and physical presence that is distinctively his own. In the materiality of his expansive expression, method and message become one.1 Romare Bearden was born in 1911 in Charlotte, North Carolina. The c…
Marisa Merz. 
Installation view 1, Serpentine Gallery, London 
(28 September - 10 November 2013) 
© 2013 Luke Hayes. …ld. In his catalogue essay Animating the Essence, RICHARD Flood reveals that Merz’s recent work has taught him the meaning of silence and of peace,2 and although this exhibition shows Merz’s technical and aesthetic diversity, there is a simplicity at its core: a calm deliberateness to the technique that prioritises the act of looking and questioning. “There are no heroes; this is a hero-less time,”3 claimed Merz in 2009, and this view is in keeping with the Serpentine show’s atmosphere of contemplation, in which the emphasis lies on the objects themselves rather than outdated notions of artistic genius. Yet Merz’s contemporary work does not seem to emerge from our own time, as such: it is bound up with the negation of heroism, rather than a proposition for the future. Villar Rojas’s installation at the Serpentine Sackler therefore provides the perfect chronological extension to Merz’s conception of the non-heroic in art by prioritising the site and the viewer, while st…
Sofia Borges. Yellow Chalk, 2017. Pigmented inkjet print, 90 9/16 × 59 1/16 in (230 × 150 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Fund for the Twenty-First Century. © 2018 Sofia Borges. …em for book covers – and admired his portraits. RICHARD Avedon, who famously said that a likeness transformed by a photograph is not a fact but an opinion, imparted a candid intimacy to portraiture that tore through the pages like the first day of spring. But those proofs? No one kept them. (Vogue’s photo archive was established only decades later.) Even the carefully positioned and lit photographs by the likes of bona fide artists such as Edward Steichen and Man Ray struck me as experiments – time-off investigations into how to revive their painting and sculpture. Their brilliance was never questioned. Just their value. As understood then, the genius of a great photograph was to recalibrate the tired eye. But fine art? Art was feeling! Art was tactile! Painting was Art; sculpture was Art; click-and-print works on paper remained clever exercises in seeing. Not so fast-forward through William Eggleston’s saturated dye-transfer takes on American suburbia that introduced colour p…
Jill Constantine, head of the Arts Council Collection, at the Making It: Sculpture in Britain 1977-1986 exhibition, Longside Gallery, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, March 2015. …ions of the work of Garth Evans (2013, curated by RICHARD Deacon) and Uncommon Ground: Land Art in Britain 1966-79 (2014), which between them covered the period from 1959-1982, where sculptural practice was very much ephemeral, conceptual, or based on performance, this current exhibition looks at the early 80s, a time when sculptural practice in the UK went back into the workshops to experiment with a completely new approach of assembling. With half the exhibits drawn from the Arts Council Collection’s own rich holdings, and with women artists featuring prominently, this exhibition celebrates the treasury of British sculpture from the years leading up to the death of Henry Moore (himself not included, but with a parallel exhibition of his work, Back to a Land, on show in the Yorkshire Sculpture Park’s Underground Gallery and open air). A number of artists rose to prominence during this period, but there has been a lack of publications and survey exhibitions – until now. The exh…
Paul Huxley in his west London studio, 14 December 2015. Photograph: Martin Kennedy. …n London, and his forthcoming exhibition at David RICHARD Gallery, Santa Fé, New Mexico, will be his first stateside solo show in nearly 40 years. Paul Huxley: Recent Paintings After Venice Biennale David RICHARD Gallery, Santa Fé, New Mexico 12 January – 20 February 2016 Interview by ANNA McNAY Filmed by MARTIN KENNEDY  …
Peggy Moffitt in topless swimsuit by Rudi Gernreich, 1964 (American, born Austria, 1922–1985). Photograph by William Claxton (American, 1927–2008). Courtesy of Demont Photo Management. …Lillian Bassman, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Cecil Beaton, RICHARD Avedon and John Rawlings. The drama of many of these photographs, particularly RICHARD Avedon's shot of Dovima with a group of elephants (Harper's Bazaar, September 1955) at the Cirque d'Hiver in Paris, suggested to women who would never wear haute couture that fashion was, indeed, a grand show. Clothing could set the stage, but the woman who wore it held the key.3 Koda and Yohannan state in the catalogue, for example, that Sunny Harnett 'projected a highly evolved notion of sophistication', while Dovima often projected 'an otherworldly exoticism–half Japanese geisha, half Flemish Madonna'. They add that 'as with every great model, Dovima was also able to convey a range of effects without diluting her own distinctive identity'. A distinctive identity links Dovima and her peers in the fifties with models in the succeeding decades of seemingly disparate characters and fashions: the sixties' British Youthquake rebellion; sevent…
Two viewers taking a lunch break in Alain Ducasse restaurant in Qatar’s Islamic Museum. …she founded and runs, funds bold commissions like RICHARD Serra’s riff on a minaret positioned to dialogue across the water with a sixties Sheraton Hotel shaped like a mastaba, and launched a public arts programme that enables projects of a scale the artists’ recession-prone economies can’t support, like the recent sprawling “Ego-Murakami” and Louise Bourgeois retrospectives held in a specially built exhibition space. Though it is unclear whether her blue-chip acquisitions are to benefit the family or the state, Sheikha Massaya well understands from her student days in Manhattan that an art scene can feed on global recognition only to a point before it will begin to feed on itself. In step with its commitment to educate and broaden the local community, the QMA underwrites outreach programmes at the interactive Katara Cultural Center, a winding, reconditioned school which functions as an exhibition-cum teaching-cum artists' residency space extending to children’s classes, o…
Isokon long chair advertisement … by RICHARD CARR There is a beautiful film called 'England: Home and Beauty' that is a testament to the glamour of the 1920s and 1930s. In it, young elegant women wearing long, sleek evening dresses arrive home late at night, alighting from their Bentleys and Lagondas and entering their flat-roofed homes built in white concrete, steel and glass - many of which are not unlike the transatlantic liners which completed the crossing from Southampton to New York in under ten days. Like the Queen Mary or the Normandie (which was a floating exhibition of French Art Deco), the houses in the film express a new attitude to design which followed the end of the First World War. It began in Russia during the Revolution (lasting there only until Stalin snuffed it out in the second half …
Musée du quai Branly, Paris, Frankrig
AJN; Ateliers Jean Nouvel. Interior view. Photo: Philippe Ruault 
© Philippe Ruault … Paris (1977) by Renzo Piano and RICHARD Rogers, a democratic 'university of the street',6 whose colourful service pipes signify the new typology of a flexible cultural centre; to the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (1997), where the logo of shimmering titanium-clad sails has revitalised derelict docklands in the Basque country of Spain into a cosmopolitan leisure destination. Bilbao epitomises the tendency to build deconstructivist spectacles, which attract criticism for overpowering the art they contain. Indeed, architect Philip Johnson said, 'When a building is as good as that one, f**k the art'. Yet simultaneously a trend towards minimalism can be traced in the neutral box of Peter Zumthor's Kunsthaus Bregenz (1997). The polarisation of designs is observed by Thierry Greub in the catalogue. To reach a golden mean, he believes that architects should return to the museum's origins, '... the dialogue between building and art, architecture and users (museum sta…
Marcel Breuer. Tubular steel armchair. Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin. Photograph: Fotostudio Bartsch …presence at the Lawn Road Flats in Hampstead (see RICHARD Carr's article on this website).9 Britain's embrace of modernism in the 1930s was so poor that most of the Bauhaus members went on to America. A small number stayed, such as the master goldsmith from the Weimar Bauhaus, Naum Slutsky, who taught at Birmingham into the 1960s. British art schools, like those in America, were nonetheless infused with the spirit of the Bauhaus, through actual teaching methods and also through the optimistic sense that art students and their teachers enter in the creative journey at the beginning of their careers. The Bauhus started much that we take for granted. A revolution in the art schools of this country began in the immediate post-war period with the reconstituted Royal College of Art (RCA). The new principal, Robin Darwin, was a painter. As at the Bauhaus, the professors were themselves practising architects, artists and designers; stars in their own spheres. RCA students were specifically …
Richard England. Al-Khazneh - The Treasury. … by RICHARD ENGLAND RICHARD England recently visited Petra. Here he eulogizes on the unique harmonious relationship between its rock carved architecture and its dramatic natural setting. “A poem-world betwixt earth and heaven” Edward Lear Some 250 kilometres from Amman and a three hour drive through the arid flat desert between Jordan’s capital and Wadi Musa (the legendary Biblical location of the spring created by Moses), before reaching the wild and alien Wadi Rum, described by T. E. Lawrence as “vast, echoing and god-like”, one encounters a dramatic change in the topography of the landscape. The barren horizontality of parched vastness suddenly mutates into an undulating, pulsating, mountainous explosion.  Landscape transmutes to moonscape and the terrain levitates into dramatic eruptions. Hidden within these motile outcrops lie the remains of Petra, the golden city of the Nabataeans, one of history’s most magical manifestations of the fusion of the hand of man …
<p>Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates. <em>Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown in the Las Vegas desert with the strip in the background</em>, 1966.  © Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates. … Richter, David Hockney, Michelangelo Pistoletto, RICHARD Hamilton and Malcolm Morley revealed this tendency towards a significant diversity. What emerged was the importance of photography as a referencing for even compositional systems. In Land Art, sculpture has developed a new territory, once prospected by Robert Smithson. By this century, RICHARD Long, Ian Hamilton Finlay, also Andy Goldsworthy had established new forms of recognising the essence of human perception in the landscape and in its materiality. Here too, modernity offers and accommodates within its theoretical field further space where architecture, sculpture and landscape correlate together. Such developments are beyond the scope of this exhibition, and outwith the time frame. But it is perhaps relevant and certainly noteworthy that Charles Jencks, a leading advocate for and definer of postmodernist architecture, has himself become somewhat independent of Postmodernism in its literal sense as he extends his talent in…
Will Alsop, Sharp Center. <em>Exterior</em>. …o, Canada Will Alsop Opened 25 September 2003 by RICHARD CARR The news that four British architectural practices - Will Alsop, Norman Foster, Grimshaw and Aedas - have made it to the final four teams selected to produce 'signature' designs for Toronto's £1.4 billion Spadina subway extension underlines the high regard given to British architects in Canada. As Toronto Transit Commission chairman Adam Giambrone has said, his demand for exceptional design was directly influenced by European projects in cities like London, Madrid and Stockholm: 'Choosing the best architects working today will signal not only to the world, but to the people of Toronto, that this city cares about excellent public spaces and facilities.' In Alsop's case, his selection may well have been influenced by his design (by Alsop Lyall & Stormer) of the North Greenwich station on London's new Jubilee Line, but it is hard not to believe that equally influential was Alsop's design of the Sharp Center for Design t…
The view to the hall gives some idea of Jacobsen's 3m grid as applied 
        to the landscaping of the college … playing fields. RICHARD Carr RICHARD Carr graduated from St Catz in 1959, after which he watched Jacobsen's buildings going up with great interest. …
Wang Du. Psychiatrie et Cardiologie, 2016. Installation view, EXPO Chicago, 2017. … individualistic tone: Gagosian showed Ed Ruscha, RICHARD Prince and Chris Burden. Galerie Daniel Templon showed Julian Schnabel and Gregory Crewdson, while David Zwirner dedicated half of its large booth to William Eggleston. [image6] Across the wider fair, paint was thick, strokes were bold, contrast was high, influences were urban, photography influential and the line between figuration and abstraction seemed more blurred than ever. A younger generation of new US artists could be seen dipping into the past 50 years of American art, with the humorous and slightly dark attitude of the aforementioned established contemporary artists, while adding a whole new set of contemporary influences from the internet, society and the city. [image13] [image15] A majority of US-based galleries took part in Expo Chicago and consequently ended up stealing the show. Washington DC-based gallery Connersmith presented US artist Wilmer Wilson IV’s plywood boards collaged with urban flyers and old l…
Frieze New York 2015. Photograph: Miguel Benavides. … of such as Ken Price and Sam Francis; a sweep of RICHARD Tuttle’s new work at Pace showed the old master acing new tricks; and a survey of John McCracken’s flamed resins at Zwirner lit their surroundings like new pennies. Refreshingly curbed was the still-trending spectacle-art that spreads out from the walls to literally stop you in your tracks. Exceptions were a couple of the still-ubiquitous pieced mirror-works aimed at the selfie generation; a few overly clever installations such as those by Josef Strau at Greene Naftali grouping the sort of disparate objects culled from thrift stores; and, at Galeria Jaqueline Martins, Martha Araújo’s – hopefully – satirical take (it won the $15,000/£9,700 Champagne Pommery prize for most innovative stand) on our interactive art moment, which loaned visitors a suit patched with Velcro and set them loose on an alarmingly steep Velcro-clad ramp. The actual showstoppers – two from the projects programme – were more intricate. Two im…
<p>Apathy’s a Drag table display, 2012. …patrons including Cornelia Parker, Iain Sinclair, RICHARD Wentworth and RICHARD Wilson. Later this month (27 June) Dilston Grove sees the opening of Swandown, a collaborative work by the artist and film maker Andrew Kötting19 and the writer, Psychogeographer (and sometimes Urban Shaman) Ian Sinclair20 “ Celebrat[ing] the Waterbound Pilgrimage, ... ever alert to the traces of submerged histories; songs, civil protest, and the wilderness, through both the real and the imagined.” Kötting and Sinclair pedalled a swan-shaped pedalo from the seaside in Hastings to Hackney in East London, via the inland waterways.” 21 Related events include PERAMBULATIONS AND CONFABULATIONS, the writer and Mythographer Marina Warner in conversation with Ian Sinclair. Move over Serpentine – CGP are stepping up to the line. References 1. SE15: Peckham hootspa 2. http:www.serpentinegallery.org/ 3. http:www.londontown.com/LondonInformation/Sights_and_Attractions/ Cafe_Gallery_Projects/959c/ 4. CGP …
Image courtesy of Royal Academy of Arts …tretat paintings are key works in Monet's career. RICHARD Thomson writes: The Manneporte is a truly striking composition. Its great sculptural form gives it the impact of the sublime. In the cramped confines of the cliff-rimmed bay, working in carefully timed sessions to avoid being stranded by the tide in a treacherous spot, Monet chose to bring the great portal into close focus, so that its huge arch fills the centre of the canvas, with views far out to the sea on either side…If he successfully evoked the sculptural sublime of the Manneporte, this was not to the detriment of naturalism and the actuality of looking. His sense of local colour was acute, nowhere more than in the sea's pearly green just below the horizon. He respected natural features, such as the flat strata set in the geological layering of the rock and chalk, or the streaks of deep brown soil spilling down from above. And he caught the moment, with silvery spray breaking on the rocks, paradoxically pa…
Albrecht Dürer. The Bathhouse, c1496-97. Woodcut on laid paper with an Imperial Orb watermark. Block and sheet: 39 x 28.1 cm. …ce, Untitled #206 (1989), depicting the artist as RICHARD III, would have clashed too violently with Wearing’s work and has accordingly been hung in another room. Similarly, The Space Age (1984) by Marlene Dumas (b1953), with its bruised appearance and receding pale blue nose, would have competed too vehemently with the oversized, fleshy Juncture (1994) by Jenny Saville (b1970). One entire wall is given over to polaroids by Andy Warhol (1928-87), displayed rather like photographs in a family home. In them, however, just like Sherman and Wearing, Warhol takes on different personae, portraying himself in whatever guise he feels fit. Similarly playing with this idea of what to hide and what to reveal of himself, Self-Portraits (1994) and Mirror Image (1974) by RICHARD Hamilton (1922-2011) show the artist at work, through a sheet of glass, on to which he smears his paint, partially obscuring his image. Gerhard Richter (b1932) goes one step further with his Untitled (Self-Portrait) (197…
Christopher Wool. Absent Without Leave (DAAD, 1993), 1993. 188 black-and-white photocopies, 21.6 x 27.9 cm each. © Christopher Wool. … Act (1988), which was done in collaboration with RICHARD Prince. “The show is over the audience get up to leave their seats …” begins the Untitled (1990-91), quoting a line from Greil Marcus’s Lipstick Traces. Wool asserts that his word paintings are active: they must “do what they say”.3 Imperative proclamations demanded by this sort of injunction are rare, however, and appear only in his later word paintings, such as: “If you can’t take a joke, you can get the fuck out of my house” (If You, 1992/2005). In most cases, Wool’s words do not tell their audience what to do in such a categorical manner, but rather create a vaguely defined psychological atmosphere by setting up a certain tone, which must be detectable by the speakers of the language, albeit at an unconscious level. This cultural subtext is most noticeable in his single-word paintings or in phrases coined from popular media, although it governs all his work, including his signature reproduced canvases, m…
Save Our Planet, Save Our Cities poster featuring Richard Buckminster Fuller's Dome Over Manhattan scheme of the early 1960s, 1971. Unknown designer © V&A Images … this particular kitchen was where Vice-president RICHARD Nixon and First Secretary of the USSR Nikita Krushchev met face-to-face for their notorious 'kitchen debate' in which they thrashed out the competing claims of communism and capitalism in providing the best quality of life for the greatest number of people. But it was also when, for perhaps ten years, Russia made an effort to match America in the field of domestic products and architecture during the thaw (as it was called) that followed Krushchev's denunciation of Stalin's policies in 1956. In the Victoria & Albert Museum's exhibition 'Cold War Modern: Design 1945-1970' photographs of this historic meeting, the American exhibition and images of Russian product and architectural designs that reflected attention to the needs of ordinary people during the thaw come in the third section. 'Cold War Modern' begins with 'Anxiety & Hope in the Aftermath of War' and 'The Conscription of the…
Sarah Lucas: I SCREAM DADDIO at the British Pavilion, Giardini di Castello, Venice, 2015. …represent Britain at the Venice Biennale. Curator RICHARD Riley talks to Studio International about why, with a new shift in her work, this is just the right moment This year’s British Pavilion at the Venice Biennale cannot be missed, sending its bright yellow, sunny rays beaming across the Giardini. As curator RICHARD Riley notes, you really can’t help but smile when you see it. Inside, new works by Sarah Lucas (b1962), built in response to the scale of the pavilion – some domestic, with domestic objects integrated into the sculptures; others larger than ever before – contain all the well-known Lucas tropes: phalluses, the nud, pages from tabloid newspapers, the toilet and cigarette butts – which, she explains, “are for titillation mostly. That is, gentle stimulation of a sexual kind.” [image2] Describing the pavilion as “a bit like a dessert” with the yellow like custard and the white of the plaster casts like meringue, Lucas offers up lashings of bawdiness and…
Gagosian. Jeff Koons, Baroque Egg with Bow (Turquoise/Magenta), 1994 – 2006. High-chromium stainless steel with transparent colour coating, 212.1 x 196.9 x 152.4 cm. One of four versions each uniquely coloured. … $10m. Just as startling, the celebrity architect RICHARD Meier, billed as having designed the perpetually idiosyncratic Gmurzynska booth (“They always get something wrong; the colour of the carpet, the hanging, the lighting,” was one overheard comment), was parked there by the Kabinett exhibiting a selection of collages he has made over 50 years while sitting on aeroplanes (that the theme is vaginas suggests flights of inordinate fancy). The mood was up across the board as investors descended on bankable art, in some cases aggressively. The top galleries were prepared for restocking, forking out $1,000 an hour to rent spaces across the way for works that are visited in situ then brought in to replace purchases – a Gagosian director said they bring down enough product to stock their walls three times over. Only a survey of the smaller booths told a different story, one that discloses the mood of the moment; while the top galleries were selling out at eye-popping prices, and the…
Anneè Olofsson. Still from <em>Evil Eye,</em> 2004. DVD, 10 minutes. Courtesy the artist and Mia Sundberg Galleri, Stockholm …ling animates the photographs of Sophie Calle and RICHARD Billingham, and Anneè Olofsson multimedia presentations. The subject of a recent one-person show at the Brooklyn Museum, Jesper Just spotlights manipulates sexual identity, gender roles and stereotypes.4 He subverts prevailing ideas of 'male' by inserting completely unexpected narrative twists in his stories and employs the common language of popular music to forge connections between artist, action and viewer. For example, in 'No Man Is an Island II' from 2004, a color DVCAM with sound, strangers in a traditionally male environment – a dark bar room – join to perform Roy Orbison's 'Crying'. Drowning sorrows in a bar is, of course, an acceptable form of male release; expressing and bonding in Jest's construction is far more effective. The surprise of his lighter touch initiates catharsis. Opposition is essential to Petah Coyne's works. In them, she confronts them all: male and female…
Vanessa Bell. Self–Portrait, c1915. Oil on canvas laid on panel, 63.8 x 45.9 cm. Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Fund. © The Estate of Vanessa Bell, courtesy of Henrietta Garnett. …r love. The curator of the 1999 Tate exhibition, RICHARD Shone, notes, that, later in life, Bell “tends to idealise her sitters, even sentimentalise them”,4 and it is clear that the works on display here stem from her best period. In fact, as Milroy observes: “Her period of procreativity [1908-18] is also her most intense period of creativity” – a fact that explodes the oft-upheld myth of motherhood and art being mutually exclusive. As well as introducing her to the work of the post-impressionists, Fry, with whom she had a three-year affair from 1911, had a significant personal influence on Bell’s work. He is said to have told her: “You have genius in your life as well as in your art, and both are rare things”.5 Of the effect of the 1910 exhibition, she later wrote: “It is impossible, I think, that any other single exhibition can ever have had so much effect as did that on the rising generation” and “Here was a possibl…


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