logo studio international
Search
 
Results
Total: 368 results found.
Joseph Beuys on The Moor of Rannoch, the place which inspired him to create his moor “action” on 13 August 1970. …ZIE 10 Dialogues presents the innovative work of RICHARD DEMARCO from the late 1960s to the present day, in bringing European artists to Scotland and his promotion of Scottish artists in Europe. The exhibition takes place in the year of RICHARD DEMARCO’s 80th birthday and the 40th anniversary of Strategy: Get Arts, “the exhibition of artists from Düsseldorf that more than any other in the post-war period challenged the Scottish art-world and public with new currents in contemporary art”.1 Founded in 1966, the DEMARCO Gallery soon developed an international stance and a commitment to emerging developments in sculpture, installation, film and video, site-specific work, performance and theatre. Close collaborations with Joseph Beuys and other Düsseldorf artists, fuelled interest and dialogue with the avant gardes of Poland, Romania and (then) Yugoslavia. 10 Dialogues reveals the pivotal position that sculptural and (more broadly) object-based work, and the documentation of perfo…
The Water Hen, Cricot 2 Theatre, Edinburgh Festival, 1972. Photograph: © Richard Demarco. …olish artist and theatre director Tadeusz Kantor, RICHARD DEMARCO, who first brought him to Britain and has ensured his legacy continues, talks about his work The Water Hen: Kantor, DEMARCO and the Edinburgh Festival Royal Scottish Academy, Edinburgh 25 July – 5 September 2015 Tadeusz Kantor: Inbetween Structures Summerhall, Edinburgh 5 August – 4 September 2015 by JANET McKENZIE from conversations with RICHARD DEMARCO and Arthur Watson August 2015. Exhibitions at the Royal Scottish Academy and Summerhall, at this year’s Edinburgh Festival, mark the centenary of the birth of Polish artist and theatre director Tadeusz Kantor. RICHARD DEMARCO first brought Kantor to Edinburgh almost half a century ago and, with him, the remarkable performance The Water Hen. The new digitalised video of that event enables audiences in 2015 to observe the inspired performance, and while the organisers are keen to point out that nothing can do justice to the event itself, it is a deeply moving exp…
Krzysztof Noworyta, Richard Demarco, Flora Crichton (Mother of Catherine Maxwell Stuart and Preceeding Laird of Traquair). …ing and proper premises but, whatever the reason, RICHARD DEMARCO's activities during the most vibrant period of the Edinburgh Festival appear to be somewhat diminished. Perhaps when one comes to surveying DEMARCO's enormous record of achievement over the past 50 years or so, expectations are raised significantly so that by comparison with the heady days of Tadeusz Kantor's Cricot Theatre, masterclasses with Joseph Beuys and Buckminster Fuller, the Edinburgh Arts expeditions, the magnificence of the Polish 'Atelier 72' and literally hundreds of other exhibitions, happenings, events, performances, anything that is organised now seems somehow less and of diminished ambition. Yet DEMARCO refuses to give up. Like many passionate actors, he will probably die on his feet 'on the boards' doing what he loves: organising, interjecting, acting as a catalyst and an inspiration. And so this year we are offered a selection of photographs and other artworks a…
George Donald . Untitled. Work on paper. 5 …nd Conflict is a natural extension of the work of RICHARD DEMARCO in Edinburgh; he has spent his life dedicated to art with a social dimension and to Scotland's place in Europe. The exhibition was a response to the atrocity of 11 September, and in relation to Scotland's participation in the Commonwealth Games earlier this year in Manchester. It was conceived as a cultural dimension to the Games. Allan Alstead in his capacity as Chef de Mission of the Scottish Team approached DEMARCO for a cultural input; he suggested that there should be an artistic response to September 11. Alstead is also the Chairman of Aid International and Mercy Corps Scotland. In his introduction to Beyond Conflict, he writes, 'In Aid International and for the work of Mercy Corps around the world the task we have set ourselves is 'to alleviate suffering, poverty and oppression by helping people all over the world build secure, productive and just communities … My vision was that from the exhibition and the tra…
Joseph Beuys 40th anniversary journey …land 8 May 2010 By DAVID GIBSON No journey with RICHARD DEMARCO would be complete without reference to Joseph Beuys, an artist whose influence on him remains as vital today as his first encounter with Beuys in 1968 at Documenta 4, Kassel, when they did not speak. DEMARCO wrote in Studio International, March 2005, about his subsequent 1970 encounter with Joseph Beuys at the artist’s studio in Dusseldorf; When I eventually met Beuys, he was fully engaged with half a dozen friends who occupied his small studio … I wondered what I could offer that would make him concentrate his attention upon Scotland … I decided not to ask him to make a new and special artwork, but to concentrate instead upon the physical reality of Scotland, the stuff and substance of its landscape and its cultural heritage …Three months later, Joseph Beuys arrived in Edinburgh … I decided to take Beuys on “The Road to the Isles” – the road celebrated in song and legend, to the world of Tir N…
Richard Demarco, Edinburgh Festival, 2013.RICHARD DEMARCO has organised exhibitions and theatre events for the Edinburgh festival since 1963. He talks about his memories of the very first festival in 1947, bringing Joseph Beuys to Scotland, his own work as an artist and the DEMARCO Archive by JANET McKENZIE Janet McKenzie: It is more than 60 years since the first Edinburgh international festival was established in 1947 in a postwar effort to “provide a platform for the flowering of the human spirit”. Can you recall for Studio International the mood and significance of the first festival? RICHARD DEMARCO: Sadly, I can remember all too well the mood and significance of the first Edinburgh festival. Sadly, because it had the virtue of being small and the Festival fringe represented no more than eight productions: it now bears no resemblance to the gigantic nature of the festival, official and fringe programmes representing more than 3,000 events. I was 17 and still a schoolboy at Edinburgh’s Holy Cross Academy. It was …
… by RICHARD DEMARCO Wednesday 13 February Depart Edinburgh Airport BA 1435 at 7.40 am arriving Heathrow 09.15 am. Depart Heathrow 10.35 am - arrive Warsaw 2 pm. Flights on time; met at airport by Jerzy Kiciak of Museum Sztuki, Lodz, who drove me to Lodz in unseasonably warm weather under a bright sky to meeting at the Museum with Miroslaw Borusiewicz, the Director, at 4.30 pm. Meeting continued over dinner until 10.30 pm. Our conversations and discussions were wide-ranging and reassured me that a collaboration between the Museum Sztuki and the DEMARCO Foundation is necessary and possible for this year’s Edinburgh Festival if it is inspired by the exhibition which the Museum has presented honouring the life and work of Ryszard Stanislawski during the twenty-five year period of his directorship, from 1965 to 1990. The Cold War created almost insurmountable difficulties and restrictions during this period. Ryszard Stanislawski, however, managed to make sure the Museum Sztuki’s colle…
… National Gallery of Modern Art (until last year) RICHARD Calvacoressi, also notable for finally securing (with the help of Eduardo Paolozzi) the Surrealist collection of Mrs Gabriel Keiller, itself now valued at as much as £110 million. He was assisted by Keith Hartley, his deputy, also distinguished for the exemplary exhibitions he curated there, such as last year's RICHARD Long retrospective. Hartley is still in post. The story of the project must wait until fuller and better particulars, firstly for the inventory of all the artists and their works, and secondly for the plan for circulating and rotating the works to the various venues becomes more fully worked. However, by any standards, this is a brilliant project, which also exudes the sheer proficiency of Anthony d'Offay the art dealer and his wife Anne. The simple yet formulaic operational plan developed with the active assistance of the American tax lawyer, Dan Burt, in part London-based, involved a part-gif…
Burma Road. Richard Demarco with Paul Neagu. …it remains a compelling force. Then in the l970s, RICHARD DEMARCO brought the European 'shaman' figure, Joseph Beuys, to Scotland, and the deeper memory seam of this past was again opened up and quarried. (The travelling documentation of the land artist Hamish Fulton here should also be remembered.) RICHARD DEMARCO looms over the Highland recovery of the contemporary arts as a result, as catalysed by his numerous summer schools of that time treading his 'Road to Meikle Seggie' itinerantly through these northern lands in the l970s, a venture so impeded by the institutions of the time, it must be said. And here in the RSA the visitor can find a whole wall of his intricate miniature sketches assembled in memory of Beuys. On a smaller scale, the 'Road to Meikle Seggie' itself is planned out on a wall in his inimitable script, an artwork all of its own. Thankfully, through the support of the Arts and Humanities Council, and Dundee University, DEMARCO's own archive, from which …
Will Maclean and Arthur Watson. <em>A Northern Viewpoint</em> (work in progress). Part of the series Cairn Gorm: Reading a Landscape on Cairn Gorm Mountain, Speyside, 2004-2008 …ional methods. Commenting on Watson's unique art, RICHARD DEMARCO has observed, '[It] derive[s] inspiration from the very stuff and substance of Scotland's landscape in relation to the unique characteristics of climate and the way in which the elemental forces of fire, earth, and water have conjoined'.4 When Watson's work was shown in Chicago (his American debut) the organiser, John David Mooney, made the observation that he was rather like the artist-monks who worked in Scotland from the fourth to the eighth centuries, but whose work reached a very wide audience. He cites the Book of Kells and the Lindisfarne Gospels as two examples of such important works historically.5 Trained as a printmaker, and playing a pivotal role as the Director of the Peacock Printmakers in Aberdeen, Watson's skill and productivity have involved him at the forefront of a number of important collaborative projects in Scotland in the past 25 years. He has served on numerous boards and panels, and has been invo…
…rch 2009 Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice by RICHARD DEMARCO Carlo Cardazzo, is now being honoured, marking the 100th anniversary of his birth. It is a name that should be known throughout the world to every student and teacher of modern art. Sadly, this is not the case. Although, it is inseparable in my mind from the names of great world-renowned 20th century artists such as Lucio Fontana, Jackson Pollock, Asger Jorn, Anthony Caro, and Giorgio Morandi. Carlo Cardazzo was not just a gallery director, he was the friend and patron of these artists. There were innumerable artists who depended on him, on his acute awareness of the significance of modernism in the visual arts related to literature. The name Carlo Cardazzo is therefore also associated with his publishing of the work of key figures under the aegis of Edizioni Cavallino. He was the publisher of works by writers such as James Joyce, Jean Cocteau, Alfred Jarry, de Lautreamont, in the form of books, graphics, multiples, and…
Tadeusz Kantor, <em>Pomnik Krzesla na Rynku w Krakowie (Monumental Chair in Kraków Square)</em>, 1970. Photomontage …he work of Kantor in 1989 by the inimitable Ricky DEMARCO, who led one of his many expeditions to the country. A meeting with Kantor was on our itinerary, and it was a bitter disappointment when the meeting did not take place, as it was undoubtedly the highlight of the journey. What has stuck in mind throughout those intervening years was the story of the 15th-century German artist, Wit Stwosz, who had travelled from Nürnberg to Kraków to escape paying a debt, but who was captured and punished by having a nail driven through his cheek. Stwosz designed and made the magnificent triptych altarpiece in St Mary's Basilica in Kraków's main square. Kantor employed the latent and layered symbolism of the Stwosz story in his theatre-work 'Let the Artist Die'. In Stwosz's suffering, Kantor saw the suffering of artists (and his own), and the story was an apt and enduring metaphor. The organisers of the symposium should have borne this story in mind when programmin…
RICHARD DEMARCO’s Edinburgh Edinburgh belongs to a special kind of city deserving of the UNESCO designation as a world heritage site. These are cities of the imagination; cities which exist on the edge, where our memories and daydreams, our histories and mythologies are interwoven. To prove this fact, I ask you to exercise your own imaginations and to tell me what you see in your mind’s eye in terms of cityscapes, buildings and famous citizens when I list the names of the following cities: Rome, Venice, Florence, Paris, Athens, Cracow, Vitebsk, Copenhagen, Prague, Barcelona, St. Petersburg, Dublin and London. Your answers could include the Sistine Chapel, The Coliseum, Piazza San Marco, The Rialto Bridge, Ponte Vecchio, The Gates of Ghiberti, The Louvre, Notre Dame d…
Studio International Yearbook 2011, cover. Image: Grayson Perry at Manchester Art Gallery. Courtesy Manchester Art Gallery. Photograph: Mark Waugh. …re twin towers makes this fully clear (page 272). RICHARD DEMARCO’s 80th anniversary discourse, 10 Dialogues: RICHARD DEMARCO, Scotland And The European Avant Garde, nimbly jumps the pitfalls (page 14). Bill Viola’s masterly video work The Quintet of the Unseen (page 70) itself penetrates incisively Renaissance subjectivity to dissemble the icon, deploying as such that sharply focused light that Caravaggio would himself apply with equal subtlety. In architecture highlights, Peter Zumthor’s perfumed wild garden was a sanctuary enclosed as the year’s coolest Summer Pavilion at the Serpentine Gallery (page 134). This stood out as a sublime combination of minimal architecture and wild nature existing under controlled conditions: it provided visitors with a welcome exclusion from the polluted outer world. Kengo Kuma’s V&A-driven Arts Centre for Dundee City (page 24) on the Firth of Tay estuary’s northern edge, on the other hand, has the semblance of a climatically eroded ic…
Benjamin Katz. Daniel Buren setting up his work <em>Without Title (red/white)</em> at the 'Westkunst' ('Art of the West') exhibition in Cologne, 1981 © VG Bildkunst, Bonn …r the aegis of the 1970 Edinburgh Festival by the RICHARD DEMARCO Gallery in collaboration with the Dusseldorf Kunsthalle with extraordinary photographs by Monika Baungartl relating to the site-specific art works made for the exhibition by Klaus Rinke, Stefan Wewerka, Ferdinand Kriwet, Gunther Uecker, Joseph Beuys and Henning Christiansen. This section is closely related to the sections considering the importance of Joseph Beuys as Professor of Sculpture at the Dusseldorf Kunstakademie from 1961 to 1972. These in turn relate to the 'actions' Beuys made from 1965 to 1974 in the Galerie Schmela and at the Moenchengladbach Museum. These actions are in direct relation to the Beuys 'action' at Edinburgh College of Art made in collaboration with Henning Christiansen, entitled 'Celtic Kinloch Rannoch: The Scottish Symphony', which was photographed by Ute Klophaus. This was the first 'action' Beuys made in Britain and through it he declared his personal commitment to the cultural…
Laura Youngson Coll. © Hydar Dewachi. …ds to the personal tragedy of losing her partner, RICHARD, to non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 2015. A mixture of fact and fiction, her depictions of tumours and chemotherapy drugs, mutated cells and antigens are at once alluring and repellent, beautiful and abject. Having fought lymphoma myself as a teenager, I was intrigued to meet with Youngson Coll to find out more about her work and her and RICHARD’s story. Anna McNay: To get an idea of your work now, we should start at the beginning and look at how you ended up working with vellum and having this studio space in a bookbinders. You studied sculpture at the Royal College of Art. What was it that led you down this route? Laura Youngson Coll: Well, I trained as a sculptor, and I did my degree in Dundee, and my MA at the Royal College. With my sculpture, I would always start by thinking of an idea, and then I’d find the materials to realise that idea. I used a lot of plant materials as well as more traditional sculpting materials – a b…
Joseph Beuys and Venetian craftsmen installing Tramstop 1976. Photo credit 
        Caroline Tisdall. Copyright DACS 2004 …more importantly, as the manifestations of love. RICHARD DEMARCO
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi …irector of the National Galleries of Scotland and RICHARD Calvocoressi, Director of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, and other distinguished followers of the artist and his work attended. There is a collage Eduardo made in the 1960s that shows an American image of a starlet ogling a muscle-bound beefcake, surrounded by candy bars, and a television set that shows the single image of a butterfly on the screen. This is quintessential Paolozzi. With just two ideas, he says it all about the transience of capitalism and material culture; more relevant now even than it was 40 years ago. This is called 'Image Fades but Memory Lingers On'. If images do fade, then Eduardo's fade very much slower than those of other artists, because fading images to keep alive certain causes and ideas was central to his art. Eduardo's imagination could be triggered by a grainy photo in a newspaper or a neglected object in a display case in the corner of a little-visited museum. Either would set h…
Will Maclean RSA - King of the Summer Isles … Charles Jencks. Back in the city, RICHARD Murphy's 'Sean Connery Film House' project is wholly urban in Festival Square, but lacks the wit and sparkle of Will Alsop's similarly rotund Fourth Grace building close to the Liverpool Waterfront, a project that has sadly now been cancelled. On the sculptural front, there is further determined evidence of a breakout, as Eduardo Paolozzi himself did from this same city. Gareth Fisher's figure, 'More Armature than Head', has a humanoid pathos; it turns traditional categories literally on their head, as in his 'G+G Head', also shown. Doug Cocker's array, 'Eight Horizons', subtly paraphrases, in finely crafted wood elements, what can be taken as readings of Scottish coastal landscape form. Jake Harvey's 'Pulse' is a typical work from him, of controlled ye…
Jeremy Deller. We Sit Starving Amidst our Gold, 2013, Installation view. Photograph: Cristiano Corte. © British Council. Jeremy Deller's British Council commission is at la Biennale di Venezia until 24th November and will tour national venues in 2014. … entitled Scotland in Europe: Europe in Scotland. RICHARD DEMARCO had given a presentation of his own plans at a private view there from 28 May, and has celebrated his own forthcoming Italo-Scottish programme at the studios of Polish artist Sonia Rolak, on the island of the Giudecca. The Giardini core is dominated by the British, French and German pavilions, which were located following that early 20th-century allocation of pavilion sites, followed by the US and Japan. Smaller nations admitted in the immediate postwar ”idealistic” era observe the pecking order: only France and Germany exhibit their frustration today by amusingly but usefully swapping their pavilions. Can Germany be serious in showing a lesser work by Ai Weiwei, an array of suspended wooden stools simulating a hanging garden? Except that the artist is everywhere, including another private gallery in Venice. (www.deutscher-pavillon.org/2013/en). This is commodification perhaps, but with some evident political motiva…
…e island of San Lazzaro degli Armeni. RICHARD DEMARCO
Gerhard Richter Paintings from private collections …Richter had first been noticed in 1965.1 We asked RICHARD DEMARCO on this latest occasion, (who had himself first invited Richter to Edinburgh during the 1970 Festival, to review the exhibition: see above). This early recognition was followed in Studio International by a full article by Heiner Stachelhaus (September 1972).2 Both instances posed critics with something of a dilemma, but they caught the challenge to painting already posed by Richter. Except for Anthony d’Offay in 1988, and the ICA in 1989, it was not until the Tate Gallery show in the 1990s, and again reflecting the stimulus of Anthony d’Offay, that Richter began to be seriously noticed here. But really it was DEMARCO’s involvement of Richter in his “Strategy Get Arts” Festival 1970 group show that started things. As Robert Storr wrote in 2002, “No one has set forth the terms of Richter’s dilemma more cogently than the artist himself. In interviews, letters and private ruminations, the leitmotifs of Rich…
Gerhard Richter.<em> Abstraktes Bild (Abstract Painting), </em>1992. Oil on canvas, 200 x 160 cm, signed and dated on reverse. Museum Frieder Burda, Baden-Baden © Gerhard Richter. Photo: Museum Frieder Burda, Baden-Baden …ty with the Scottish Enlightenment. RICHARD DEMARCO
Cover of <em>Studio International</em> May, 1971. …an outstanding recent retrospective exhibition on RICHARD Long. There is a curious irony here: never has Long's work been so superbly exhibited anywhere, as in the NGMA's present building - this neo-classical Schinkelesque mid-l9th Century former school building. At the time this building was put at the disposal of the Trustees of the National Gallery, in the mid-l970s, the Property Services Agency (UK) was put in charge of the conversion. One of the first things which this Government body proposed was the ripping out of the superb, mildly patinated granite floor paving slabs on the central corridor on the grounds that these were of uneven surface. Fortunately, this imbecility, of an enslaved bureaucracy, was stopped by the Trustees and the conservation authorities. So what was almost lost we now see today: a well-used but beautifully polished set of flagstones, utterly harmonious with the work of RICHARD Long, which can never accordingly have looked better in-situ in a major galler…
Unconcealed

The International Network of Conceptual Artists 1967–77: Dealers, Exhibitions and Public Collections …alers, Exhibitions and Public Collections Sophie RICHARD, Lynda Morris (ed.) London: Ridinghouse, 2009. ISBN 978 1 905464 17 3 Review by SAM ROSE In January 1967 Sol LeWitt, then an artist just starting to make his presence felt in Europe, wrote to the dealer Konrad Fischer to discuss sales: “What happened about Multiple? Hans Mayer wanted to make a large (150 cm) one. This is a mistake. If someone buys this, then they will not buy a large piece.”1 It’s striking how easily Jeff Koons and Larry Gagosian could have solved this problem for LeWitt: make a large multiple in a tiny edition, place one or two with major collectors or museums, then rely on the conferred status to create a “multiple” more prestigious and fetishised than any one-off work. Yet Sophie RICHARD’s book also reveals that such strategies were already in development. Not only is the text littered with acknowledgements by dealers of the need to get works into public collections – offering lower prices to…


studio international logo
Copyright © 1893–2018 Studio International Foundation.

The title Studio International is the property of the
Studio International Foundation and, together with
the content, are bound by copyright. All rights reserved.
studio international cover 1894
Home About Studio
Archive Yearbooks
Interviews Contributors
Video Cybernetic Serendipity
CyberArt Contact us
twitter facebook RSS feed instagram

Studio International is published by:
the Studio International Foundation, PO Box 1545,
New York, NY 10021-0043, USA