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Alexander Tovborg. Mennesket og jeanne d’arc (kampen) hvem er dit sværd II [The human and Joan of Arc (the struggle) who is your sword II], 2018. Acrylic, pastel crayon, felt and holy water on wooden panel, 300 x 600 x 6 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Galleri Nicolai Wallner. Photo: Anders Sune Berg.
The Danish artist mixes his paint with holy water. Here, he talks religion, irony and bringing mystery back into art
Esther Pearl Watson. Due to Transportation, 2019. Acrylic, collage and glitter on canvas, 91.4 x 91.4 cm. © Esther Pearl Watson, courtesy Maureen Paley, London.
The Los Angeles-based painter presents an offbeat world that reflects on a distinctly American kind of idealism.
The Picture of Health, Jo Spence in collaboration with Rosy Martin, Maggie Murray and Terry Dennet, 1982. Copyright The Jo Spence Memorial Archive, Ryerson University, Courtesy MACBA Collection.
This bold exhibition brings together two challenging female artists insistent on exploring identity and the medicalised body.
Rachel  Howard. Photo: Carla Borel.
The artist talks about her interest in madness and the edge of things and the five large-scale paintings in her show l’Appel du Vide, which opens this month at Blain Southern in New York.
Sammy Baloji, Salzburg International Summer Academy of Fine Arts. Photo: Mira Turba.
The Brussels-based Congolese artist talks about the past and present of colonialism and mineral extraction in the context of his recent exhibition at Salzburg’s Stadtgalerie Museumspavillon, Salzburg Summer Academy.
Sohrab Hura, The Coast, 2019. Image copyright Sohrab Hura.
The photographer talks about his new book, Coast, and his aim of sucking viewers in with a narrative and then taking them to a point of incoherence so that they look at things anew.
Bartolomé Bermejo. Desplà Pietà, 1490. Oil on poplar panel, 175 × 189 cm. Barcelona Cathedral. © Catedral de Barcelona (Photo: Guillem F-H).
A display of paintings by Spanish Renaissance painter Bartolomé Bermejo forms a picture of religious upheaval and artistic excellence.
Documentation of the making of Assisted Self-Portrait of Kristel Asjoe, from Assembly (2013-2014) by Anthony Luvera.
Luvera is the editor of Photography for Whom?, a new journal focusing on community photography projects. Here, he talks about lesser-known works from a movement that began in the 1970s, as well as contemporary practices.
France-Lise McGurn. Photo: Tate Photography.
McGurn talks about motherhood, sleeplessness and strangeness in Glasgow, Berlin and Ibiza, and how they have fed into the work for her new exhibition at Tate Britain.
Milton Avery. Two Poets, 1963. Oil on canvas, 127 x 152.4 cm (50 x 60 in). Courtesy Victoria Miro, Venice.
Focusing on works done in the final four years of Avery’s career, these portraits depict the people and motifs closest to him.
Issy Wood, All The Rage, installation view, Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art, 2019. Photo: Mark Blower.
Wood’s tragicomic paintings explore the apathetic alienation symptomatic of a networked, throwaway society, in which our understanding of ‘self’ is determined through the consumption of goods and images.
AlanJames Burns, Creswell Crags Cave, Worksop, 2019. Photo: Martin Kennedy.
Burns guides us around the cave where his latest installation is taking place and explains that, historically, caves have played a vital role in the simultaneous evolution of consciousness and creativity.
Fiona Tan: Disorient, installation view, Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow, 2019. Photo: Ruth Clarke.
Tan’s two-screen video installation is an unsettling look at the legacy of colonialism and a stark reminder that the west’s sense of superiority still persists.
David Batchelor, 2019. Photo: Lucy Dawkins. Courtesy of the Artist and Ingleby, Edinburgh.
Batchelor’s playful exploration of colour through sculpture, installation and painting pays tribute to the original Bauhaus movement while cleverly subverting it.
David Wojnarowicz with Tom Warren, Self-Portrait of David Wojnarowicz, 1983–84. Acrylic and collaged paper on gelatin silver print, 152.4 × 101.6 cm. Collection of Brooke Garber Neidich and Daniel Neidich. Photograph courtesy Museo Reina Sofia.
A comprehensive survey of the impassioned American artist and writer proves his relevance then and now, without stinting from the lows – as well as the highs – of his prodigious output.
Fra Angelico. Annunciation and Expulsion of Adam and Eve from Eden, c1425–26. Tempera and gold on panel, 190.3 x 191.5 cm. Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado.
An exquisite exhibition at the Prado reveals the most joyous and serene of Italian artists as a pivotal figure in the development of the Renaissance.
Bertille Bak. Faire le mur, 2008. Video 4:3 stereo, 17 mins, set photography. Production Le Fresnoy – Studio national des arts contemporains. Courtesy Bretelle Bak / Le Fresnoy
At the Merz Foundation in Turin, on the occasion of its third art prize, Bertille Bak reflects on a Romany community living on the periphery in Paris.
Heike-Karin Föll, my brain, 2010–19. Installation view (detail), Speed. KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin, 2019. Photo: Frank Sperling.
In her first institutional solo show, the German artist plays on the fast fickleness of commodification, trend and fashion.
Ima-Abasi Okon, Infinite Slippage: nonRepugnant Insolvencies T!-a!-r!-r!-y!-i!-n!-g! as Hand Claps of M’s Hard’Loved’Flesh [I’M irreducibly-undone because] —Quantum Leanage-Complex-Dub, 2019. Installation view, Chisenhale Gallery, 2019. Commissioned and produced by Chisenhale Gallery, London. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Andy Keate.
Old air-conditioning units, poor-quality ceiling tiles coated with ultrasound gel and gold – the utilitarian and the precious come together in Okon’s fascinating installations.
Leo Warner, director of 59 Productions.
Warner, design director of multimedia visual artists and impresarios 59 Productions talks about collaborative creativity, working across global as well as technical boundaries, sources of inspiration and how technology should always be subservient to the story.
Patrick Staff: The Prince of Homburg, installation view, Dundee Contemporary Arts, 2019. Photo: Ruth Clark.
Through video installation, sculpture and printmaking, Staff uses a play from 1810 as a vehicle to explore queerness and sexual identity in today’s world.
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