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Magic Realism: Art In Weimar Germany 1919-33

Tate Modern’s exhibition on magic realism brings together the works of troubled minds from turbulent times

Hans Grundig. Girl with Pink Hat, 1925 (detail). The George Economou Collection. © DACS, 2018.
Simon English. Photograph: Jenny Lewis.
The London-based artist Simon English talks about chance, addiction and the wilful act of drawing.
Christopher Williams. Best.Nr.: 68011, Best.Nr.: 28856, Best.Nr.: 28856. Brushed aluminium – dishwasher safe sauce pan and stew pot. Studio Rhein Verlag, Düsseldorf. 26 January 2017. Inkjet print, 73.7 x 92.2 cm paper. Courtesy the artist, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne and David Zwirner, New York / London / Hong Kong. © the artist.
In this exhibition, which includes seven photographs and several blank walls, the US photographer investigates systems of meaning and classification.
Ana Mendieta. Sweating Blood, 1973. Super 8 film, colour, silent. Photograph: The Estate of Ana Mendieta Collection, LLC. Courtesy of Galerie Lelong & Co.
Mud, blood, fire and water: a touring exhibition of the Cuban American artist affirms her continuing relevance while revealing her formidable skill as a film-maker.
E.V. Day talking to Studio International at the opening of Intersection: International Art and Culture, Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, Beijing, 27 May 2018. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
In a riveting, large-scale work called Moss Ball: A Meditation on the Overview Effect (2018), E.V. Day makes some unlikely, and therefore all the more intriguing, connections.
Mark Fox talking to Studio International at the opening of Intersection: International Art and Culture, Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, Beijing, 27 May 2018. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
Mark Fox, who was brought up as a Catholic, has issues with certain of the religion’s doctrines and belief systems, in what he calls a “love/hate response”.
Tania Kovats (right, photograph © Robin Mills) and Kimathi Donkor (photograph © Kimathi Donkor).
After the pop-up symposium Lines of Thought at Trinity Buoy Wharf, the new partner for what was formerly the Jerwood Drawing Prize, practitioners and educators Tania Kovats and Kimathi Donkor talked about drawing in education and practice today.
Patricia Guzman. Meditations, 2018. Oil on canvas, 100 x 150 cm.
In celebration of its 25th anniversary, the Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University has invited 14 artists from around the world to submit work that emphasises the universality of the language of art.
Cybernetic Serendipity: the computer and the arts. Edited by Jasia Reichardt. Published by Studio International (special issue), 1968. © Studio International Foundation.
To mark the 50th anniversary of this pioneering publication and exhibition, Cybernetic Serendipity: The Computer and the Arts has been reprinted and is available to purchase.
Edward Bawden. [Aesop’s Fables] Gnat and Lion, 1970. Colour linocut on paper. Trustees of the Cecil Higgins Art Gallery (The Higgins Bedford), © Estate of Edward Bawden.
The Dulwich Picture Gallery examines the vibrant world of Edward Bawden with a typically joyous exhibition.
VTN Architects. Photograph: Veronica Simpson.
The 16th Architecture Biennale focuses on freespace – in which buildings are engaging, inclusive and accessible to all and use the Earth’s resources wisely. And the curators, Shelley McNamara and Yvonne Farrell, have mostly succeeded in their aim to offer a ‘box of treasures’.
Rajyashri Goody.
Goody, herself of Dalit heritage, talks about discrimination in India against the Dalits and how, in her first solo exhibition, she is using photographs of her family and turning Dalit literature into recipes, to highlight the significant and complex relationship with food among a people historically denied it.
Tamara Henderson at Cass Sculpture Foundation. Photograph: Barney Hindle.
The artist discusses the transmigration of the soul, the transformative properties of clay, and using art as a way of mourning.
Thierry Oussou. Trompe d’éléphant, 2018. Mixed media on paper, 150 x 152 cm (59 1/8 x 59 7/8 in).
The Benin-born artist Thierry Oussou reflects on his artistic practice, the need for repatriation of cultural objects, and art and culture in Africa more generally.
Tai Xiangzhou talking to Studio International at the opening of Intersection: International Art and Culture, Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, Beijing, 27 May 2018. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
Tai Xiangzhou is committed to a traditional lexicon, his ink paintings magnificent, deeply indebted to classic Chinese ink paintings while they simultaneously demonstrate the influence of baroque and mannerist paintings and contemporary practices.
Frieda Nake talking to Studio International at the opening of Intersection: International Art and Culture, Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, Beijing, 27 May 2018. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
Frieder Nake’s work 12/7/65 No. 2, 1965 is a pioneering example of computer art in which the image is wholly machine-generated. It has “zero meaning”, he likes to say, even if somewhat ironically.
Cui Xiuwen (1967–2018). Photograph: Miguel Benavides.
Chinese artist Cui Xiuwen died in Beijing, where she was based, on 1 August, at the age of 51, after a protracted illness. She was born in Harbin, Heilongjiang province in 1967.
Cui Xiuwen at the opening of her exhibition Light, at the Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University in Beijing. Photograph: Miguel Benavides.
Cui Xiuwen, one of the most important avant-garde artists from China, passed away yesterday, leaving behind a unique collection of artworks devoted to life. She was selfless and worked hard for the benefit of humanity  .
Jacob Hashimoto. Never Comes Tomorrow, 2015-18, Liggett Hall, Governors Island. Photograph: Timothy Schenck.
The artist talks about The Eclipse, an installation comprising thousands of paper kites, and Never Comes Tomorrow, which references cosmology and history and is covered in hundreds of political stickers.
Leonor Antunes. Alterated knot 3, 2018. Nylon rope, hemp rope, brass tube, wax. Photograph: Nick Ash. Copyright: Leonor Antunes. Courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery.
The sculptor talks about learning traditional crafts, the Smithsons’ Solar Pavilion, creating an exhibition for Mexico, and how her work resembles choreography.
Mark Wallinger talking to Studio International at the Jerwood Gallery in Hastings, 2018. Photograph: Tom Hastings.
The Human Figure in Space returns this Turner Prize-winning British artist to his longstanding interest in the photographer Eadweard Muybridge. Here, Wallinger reflects on spectatorship and the mirrored world.
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