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This publication focuses on explaining the relationship between writing and drawing; the ideas raised at the symposium are expanded and clarified, with the inclusion of artists’ and academics’ contributions from sources as diverse as Oxford professor emeritus Martin Kemp – who has written on the Leicester Codex by Leonardo da Vinci and Professor Asa Briggs (a leading British historian and a key code-breaker at Bletchley Park during the second world war) – who discusses, “Drawing as Code”.

The Drawn Word is the product of a research project funded by an Arts and Humanities Research Council networking grant that explored the relationship between writing, drawing and literacy. As such it is a collaborative publication between Studio International, the University of the Arts London (UAL) and the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University (RMIT).

Editors: Professor Stephen Farthing RA and Dr Janet McKenzie
Publisher: Studio International and the Studio Trust, New York and London, 2014.
Content: 128 pages, full colour.
Language: English.
ISBN: 9780983259954 (Softcover).
Dimensions: 280 x 115 x 11 mm (11.0 x 8.7 x 7/16 in).
Price: UK £20, US $30, A $40.

Anishinaabe expressionist artist George Morrison (1919-2000) was born on the Grand Portage Indian Reservation in Minnesota, but his quest as an artist took him far, both literally – he  studied in France, Italy and Spain and at the Art Students League of New York, painted on Cape Code and taught at the Rhode Island School of Design – and figuratively – he became friends with Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning and other prominent action painters and abstract expressionists. While his aesthetic drew on their modernist vision, he embraced nature as his religion, inspired by the rocks, trees, woods and wide horizon surrounding his birthplace as well as his people’s legends. Modern Spirit: The Art of George Morrison, a touring retrospective of his exquisite paintings, elemental totemic sculpture, and drawings and prints, highlights the romantic, spiritual dimensions of his art.

National Museum of the American Indian, New York City, 24 October 2013 – 23 February 2014 and travelling to six museums during 2015. 

 

It is with great sadness that we announce the death of Cindi Di Marzo, aged 52. Cindi contributed beautifully written, insightful reviews and interviews to Studio International for many years. She was a much loved colleague and friend, and her enthusiasm and consummate professionalism were an inspiration to all. She will be dearly missed by all at Studio.
She once told me: "Enjoy life, life is short." Cindi, your life was indeed too short. Our thoughts and prayers are with her family at this sad time.
Cindi Di Marzo left us on Saturday April 25, 2015.
Miguel Benavides
Editor

Following its premiere outside his native China at Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art last year, multimedia artist Xu Bing’s vast sculpture Phoenix (2008-2010), consisting of male and female bird figures built with cast-offs gleaned from urban construction sites in China, is coming to New York, where the birds will take flight from the nave of a towering Gothic Revival church on the city’s Upper West Side. Weighing 12 tonnes each, the two birds represent the dignity of migrant workers, the artefacts of their daily lives, and the growing divide between the material and the spiritual in his country.

Cathedral of St John the Divine, New York, 1 March 2014 – January 2015



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