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Christopher Williams: Normative Models

In this exhibition, which includes seven photographs and several blank walls, the US photographer investigates systems of meaning and classification

Christopher Williams. Best.Nr.: 68011, Best.Nr.: 28856, Best.Nr.: 28856 (detail). Brushed aluminium – dishwasher safe sauce pan and stew pot. Studio Rhein Verlag, Düsseldorf. 26 January 2017. Courtesy the artist, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne and David Zwirner, New York / London / Hong Kong. © the artist.
Tamara Henderson at Cass Sculpture Foundation. Photograph: Barney Hindle.
The artist discusses the transmigration of the soul, the transformative properties of clay, and using art as a way of mourning.
Thierry Oussou. Trompe d’éléphant, 2018. Mixed media on paper, 150 x 152 cm (59 1/8 x 59 7/8 in).
The Benin-born artist Thierry Oussou reflects on his artistic practice, the need for repatriation of cultural objects, and art and culture in Africa more generally.
Tai Xiangzhou talking to Studio International at the opening of Intersection: International Art and Culture, Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, Beijing, 27 May 2018. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
Tai Xiangzhou is committed to a traditional lexicon, his ink paintings magnificent, deeply indebted to classic Chinese ink paintings while they simultaneously demonstrate the influence of baroque and mannerist paintings and contemporary practices.
Frieda Nake talking to Studio International at the opening of Intersection: International Art and Culture, Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, Beijing, 27 May 2018. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
Frieder Nake’s work 12/7/65 No. 2, 1965 is a pioneering example of computer art in which the image is wholly machine-generated. It has “zero meaning”, he likes to say, even if somewhat ironically.
Cui Xiuwen (1967–2018). Photograph: Miguel Benavides.
Chinese artist Cui Xiuwen died in Beijing, where she was based, on 1 August, at the age of 51, after a protracted illness. She was born in Harbin, Heilongjiang province in 1967.
Cui Xiuwen at the opening of her exhibition Light, at the Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University in Beijing. Photograph: Miguel Benavides.
Cui Xiuwen, one of the most important avant-garde artists from China, passed away yesterday, leaving behind a unique collection of artworks devoted to life. She was selfless and worked hard for the benefit of humanity  .
Jacob Hashimoto. Never Comes Tomorrow, 2015-18, Liggett Hall, Governors Island. Photograph: Timothy Schenck.
The artist talks about The Eclipse, an installation comprising thousands of paper kites, and Never Comes Tomorrow, which references cosmology and history and is covered in hundreds of political stickers.
Leonor Antunes. Alterated knot 3, 2018. Nylon rope, hemp rope, brass tube, wax. Photograph: Nick Ash. Copyright: Leonor Antunes. Courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery.
The sculptor talks about learning traditional crafts, the Smithsons’ Solar Pavilion, creating an exhibition for Mexico, and how her work resembles choreography.
Mark Wallinger talking to Studio International at the Jerwood Gallery in Hastings, 2018. Photograph: Tom Hastings.
The Human Figure in Space returns this Turner Prize-winning British artist to his longstanding interest in the photographer Eadweard Muybridge. Here, Wallinger reflects on spectatorship and the mirrored world.
David Chipperfield.
Fresh from his transformation of the Royal Academy of Arts, David Chipperfield talks about architecture as a form of diagnostics, assisting the life and culture of its inhabitants, and about staying out of the way of the art.
Gustav Klimt. Reclining Nude with Drapery, Back View, 1917–1918. Graphite, 14 5/8 x 22 3/8 in (37.1 x 56.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982.
Stirring and challenging, this frontal look at ecstasy revels in desire as it pits the age-old tradition of nude models against our #MeToo moment.
Patricia Guzman talking to Studio International at the opening of Intersection: International Art and Culture, Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, Beijing, 27 May 2018. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
Patricia Guzman’s expertly executed realism makes her paintings appear photographic, as she documents faces that attract her sympathy, often closeup.
Thomas Bayrle: Playtime, 2018. Exhibition view, New Museum, New York. Photograph: Maris Hutchinson/EPW Studio.
This major retrospective of the work of Thomas Bayrle brings together works from the past 50 years and throws an unsettling light on the nature of society.
Alex Prager. The Big Valley: Desiree, 2008. © Alex Prager Studio and Lehmann Maupin, New York and
Hong Kong. Courtesy Alex Prager Studio, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong.
Prager revels in cliche and it is clear from the large Technicolor photographs and the handful of films shown here that subtlety holds no interest for her. I am left wondering what it is that she intends to add to the conversation.
Bro Pei talking to Studio International at the opening of Intersection: International Art and Culture, Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, Beijing, 27 May 2018. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
Bao Pei uses ink and paper in the tradition of Chinese ink painting, but makes her work abstract, and uses knives instead of brushes because she believes the delivery of the ink, the markings, are more forceful that way, conveying greater emotional depth and range.
Tacita Dean Portrait © Jim McHugh.
Centred around the theme of “performance”, this show cleverly connects the art, film and theatre worlds, which cross over not only in Edinburgh’s summer festival lineups, but also in Dean’s work to date.
Ardan Özmenoğlu. Beauty Balloon, 2015. Mixed technique on post-it notes, 95 x 94 cm.  Photograph courtesy Emmanuel Fremin Gallery.
The Turkish artist known for her distinctive works with Post-it notes talks about how she turns them into 3D paintings, her love of repetition, political humour, and her latest project, to turn a soap factory into an art space.
Curator Henry Skerritt and Director Margo Smith.
With more than 1,900 works, the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection at the University of Virginia is the largest collection of Indigenous art in the US. Here, Margo Smith, the director, and Henry Skerritt, the curator, talk about the museum and its work.
Desmond Paul Henry. Untitled. Mechanical pen and ink drawing, Britain, 1964. Given by Elaine O’Hanrahan. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.
This beautifully curated display includes work from the pioneers of digital art of the 1950s and 60s through to the younger generations practising today.
Portrait of Alicia Kopf by Laia Guitierrez, 2015.
Catalan artist Alicia Kopf has won acclaim for her novel Brother in Ice, which sits at the pinnacle of a cycle of artistic projects about the Arctic and the Antarctic. Here, she talks about her own epic story.
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